Scheduled System Maintenance:
On May 6th, single article purchases and IEEE account management will be unavailable from 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM ET (12:00 - 21:00 UTC). We apologize for the inconvenience.
By Topic

Artificial Intelligence in Educational Software (Digest No. 1998/313), IEE Colloquium on

Date 12 Jun 1998

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 4 of 4
  • IEE Colloquium on Artificial Intelligence in Educational Software (Digest No.1998/313)

    Publication Year: 1998
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (332 KB)  

    The following topics are dealt with: artificial intelligence in educational software; intelligent coaching systems; and real world training via AI View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • What are intelligent coaching systems and why are they (in)evitable?

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 2/1 - 2/5
    Cited by:  Papers (1)  |  Patents (40)
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (316 KB)  

    The paper is about intelligent coaching systems (ICS). ICSs are systems that “look over the shoulder” of a student or user, and interpret his/her performance of a cognitive task. This task may be an educational exercise-e.g. solving a physics problem-training of plant operators or pilots in (simulated) environments, or the use of a computer application. In the latter case the ICS is called an intelligent help system (IHS). ICSs are different from conventional training or help environments because they can interpret the task performance in terms of individual reasoning steps and not only in terms of global performance metrics or prestored categories. Although the role of an ICS can be compared to that of a human coach, e.g., the sports coach of an individual athlete, ICSs represent a new species of educational media for which there is no actual equivalent. Both in education and in industrial training it is practically impossible to cater for the required one-to-one correspondence between trainer and trainee. Having a private coach that keeps track of all your performances and pays full attention to your current steps is a luxury rather than the prototype educational relationship where a master is permanently coaching the apprentice on the job View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • What does the “AI” in AIED buy?

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 3/1 - 3/4
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (368 KB)  

    Educational computing has spawned a number of fairly self contained intellectual communities. One is broadly covered by the phrase computer assisted instruction (CAI, CAL, CBT and its many variants) and the other by artificial intelligence in education (AIED, ITS, ICAI and its many variants). CAI is usually seen to be concerned to produce intelligently designed software to solve essentially educational goals by whatever computational means can be achieved. The methods are eclectic and the emphasis is on what really works from an educational point of view. AIED is traditionally seen as more of a research activity, as being concerned to produce programs of greater generality (though not necessarily of greater educational effectiveness) and as having its roots in cognitive psychology. In what particular ways do ICAI systems differ from CAI systems? The main answer lies in the way that an intelligent system can potentially tailor the interaction to suit the individual learner or group of learners. The paper briefly explores the question of how much educational difference the “AI” in an AIED system makes compared either to conventional classroom teaching or to conventional CAI methods. One criterion of educational effectiveness might be the amount of time it takes students to reach a particular level of achievement. Another might be an improvement in achievement levels, given the same time on task View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Grounded in reality: the infiltration of AI into practical educational systems

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 1/1 - 1/4
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (228 KB)  

    The paper aims to present a `bottom up' approach to showing the relevance of artificial intelligence for systems to support learning. In the past, work in AIED has tended to be driven by researchers who begin with some idea or theory about some cognitive process (such as creative problem solving, qualitative reasoning, learning from analogies, and so on) or perhaps with some particular technique (such as assumption based truth maintenance, fuzzy logic, case based reasoning, etc.) which may have some use in educational systems. We then try to find a knowledge domain (such as geometry problem solving, medical diagnosis, foreign language learning, etc.) in which to explore these theories and techniques. And, finally, if we are lucky, we might try out our system in a realistic context. The author presents four case studies which are representative of the range of computer based learning systems. All were begun with a practical objective; all have evolved to discover the need for AI techniques. None is an `AIED system': AI is not a major or motivating component of the system, it is just one of a battery of techniques or technologies which are brought to bear on the problem. Then the author gives some general comments on where AI fits into the design of practical learning and training systems View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.