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System Sciences (HICSS), 2011 44th Hawaii International Conference on

Date 4-7 Jan. 2011

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Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 500
  • Preface

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 1
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  • [Title page]

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 1 - 2
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  • [Copyright notice]

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 1
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  • Citation information

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 1
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  • Conference Administration

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 1 - 10
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  • Reviewers

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 1 - 8
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  • Proceedings

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 1
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  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 1 - 47
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  • A Cross-Cultural Collaborative Learning Project: Learning about Cultures and Research Methods

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 1 - 9
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (293 KB)  

    English-speaking students in courses on cross-cultural communication often comment on how little actual contact they have had with people from other cultures. Similarly, students in English for Academic Purposes for nonnative speakers courses relate how hard it is to connect with native English speakers. De-spite obvious mutual benefit, there is seldom a close relationship between instructors of regular program courses and English for academic purposes (EAP) instructors. This paper describes a collaborative project which bridges these gaps within a university setting. The challenges and benefits of this collaborative project for all participants are presented, as are suggestions for establishing more institutionalized contacts across disciplines. View full abstract»

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  • A Study of Structured Lecture Podcasting to Facilitate Active Learning

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 1 - 10
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    This paper presents an overview of a study of educational podcasting in higher education. This research aims to remedy pedagogical deficiencies in lecture podcasting by structuring content with chapter features designed to facilitate active learning behaviors. Also as mobile media players are quickly becoming ubiquitous, so is media multitasking. However, media multitasking, the processing of multiple information streams, presents challenges for human cognition. This study further investigated relationships in the usage of the chapter features through multitasking preferences and aspects of psychological flow. The study revealed that students used the chapter features as a supporting resource in their lecture study strategies for selection and review behaviors and also to support both their multitasking and flow behavioral preferences. The theory driven method and instrument developed to conduct this research can facilitate future studies. View full abstract»

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  • Ammunition Multimedia Encyclopedia (AME): A Case Study

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 1 - 10
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1479 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Many organizations are using Distance Learning (DL) technology to expedite training. The military in particular is implementing DL because technology is transforming warfighting which means training loads are increasing. The demographics of the military are changing, with the Digital (D) Generation being the majority of new recruits. DL has been successful with the D Generation because they are very technology savvy and very comfortable using computers. This paper presents a theory-based description of how a comprehensive web-based application known as the Ammunition Multimedia Encyclopedia (AME) was developed that provides a wide range of information for ammunition handling and transportation. View full abstract»

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  • Collaborative Learning through Wireless Grids

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 1 - 10
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (366 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this paper, we describe wireless grids, an emerging technology that enables ad hoc sharing of resources (such as screen, services and microphone) on edge devices (such as mobile Internet devices, laptops and mobile phones). As wireless devices have become common, and "smart," wireless grids have become practical. To highlight the capabilities of wireless grids to support collaborative learning, projects at the K-12 and undergraduate levels illustrate that wireless grid theory is transitioning into practice. We hypothesize that wireless grids can transform how students learn, the content of courses, learning-related practices, classroom dynamics and relationships among students and faculty. The authors conclude that applications of this technology will bring about fundamental changes in the ways that students, schools and universities create and disseminate ideas, knowledge, and understanding. The mobile phone is no longer banned in the classroom; it becomes a tool for instruction and learning. View full abstract»

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  • Designing Technological Support for Meaning Making in Museum Learning: An Activity-Theoretical Framework

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 1 - 10
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (352 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The paper proposes a conceptual framework, informed by activity theory, for designing technological support for meaning making in museum learning. The model describes a complex interaction between two activity contexts, the one associated with learners' own interests, goals and expectations, and the one associated with the design, functionality, and history of a museum artifact. The model is intended to be used as an analytical tool supporting a systematic exploration of specific interaction design solutions for enhancing learners' experience in museum settings. View full abstract»

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  • Investigating the Trend of Non-Task Social Interactions in Online Collaborative Learning Environments

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 1 - 8
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (237 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    While there have been many studies on instructional and on-task side of computer supported collaborative learning (CSCL), social and non-task side of the CSCL has received less attention. This paper observes and studies the pattern of non-task social messaging over a period of time in online Seminar rooms -designed for learning activities- as well as Coffee shops- designed for informal conversations. The objective is to firstly uncover the pattern of social interactions in the online collaborative learning environment and, secondly to understand how the level of social interactions changes over time and what factors facilitate and lead such changes. Transcript Analysis Tool (TAT) has been used to code discussions of three online classes during a 10-week postgraduate summer course in an Australian university. Findings have indicated existence of a substantial amount of non-task interactions among students. Furthermore, the results have shown a larger amount of non-task interactions occurred at the beginning and end of the semester as well as during some special occasions. Students' willingness to share personal and work-related experiences with other classmates is amongst top factors leading such trend in social interactions in the environment. View full abstract»

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  • Mapping Learning Aids and Introducing Learning Styles as a Moderator

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 1 - 10
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    There is evidence that different learning styles require diverse modes of communication. Based on 377 completed standardized questionnaires this study contributes to this field of research. To test the relation between learning aids and learning styles double coded data is analyzed by applying a multiple correspondence analysis. Further, impacts of extrinsic motivation, self-efficacy, subject-value, and the usefulness of an e-learning system on actual success (grades) are examined. Furthermore, differences between learning styles are revealed by applying a structural equation model. Results show that for a marketing-students population various sources need to be provided to cater diverse learning styles. It is also shown that the examined aspects impact on students' actual performance differently depending on their learning styles. Implications and future study suggestions are provided. View full abstract»

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  • Matching the Affordances of Wikis to Collaborative Learning: A Case Study of IT Project Students

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 1 - 10
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (766 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The use of Web 2.0 technologies is increasingly common in many aspects of life: social, work, and study. The study reported here looks into how one type of Web 2.0 tool, the wiki, was being used to support groups of IT students involved in a collaborative authentic-task in their undergraduate studies to develop a software solution required by their "clients". The study indicates the existence of a mismatch between what supports are needed by the students, with how they use the wiki tool to support their needs. The mismatch is not the result of a lack of technical skills or aversion to technology, but rather the lack of ability to perceive the affordance of the tool in meaningful ways to facilitate the collaborative activity at hand. View full abstract»

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  • Using Interactive Graphical Tools to Overcome the "Collage Effect" in Collaborative Learning Environments

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 1 - 10
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (820 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The "collage effect" occurs when participants in a collaborative learning environment post non-collaborative contributions to a shared workspace, as opposed to contributions that are co- constructive. The resulting artifacts become a collage of individual contributions that do not fully engage the partici-pants in the collaborative learning process. Most online, asynchronous collaborative tools only allow participants to participate with textual interactions, which discourage co-construction in ways discussed in the paper. Graphical tools could provide better affordances for co-construction. HTML provides little support to represent inter-active graphical elements in online environments. However, with SVG and AJAX, we can create inter-active graphical tools in an online environment. Using SVG and AJAX, we implemented concept maps in an online learning environment called MapCourse. We used MapCourse in several different asynchro-nous online assignments in two different courses. Our analyses suggest that concept maps encourage more co-constructive contributions than wikipages. View full abstract»

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  • Virtual Team Role Play Using Second Life for Teaching Business Process Concepts

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 1 - 8
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (543 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper describes the use of a virtual world environment to facilitate a role play assignment for buying and selling Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) software solutions in a distributed environment. The exercise involved the use of Second Life to facilitate the virtual presentation and meeting among the vendors and the purchaser of the software. Students playing vendors and purchase roles were organized into teams who meet, collaborate, and negotiate business transactions in the virtual environment. The aim of the experiment was to introduce students to properties of ERP-systems which are the most common software systems used by businesses, and at the same time introduce tools for virtual team collaboration in an international setting between students in Norway and Australia. This paper reports the experiences from the students' and teachers' perspectives and we give recommendations regarding the use of Second Life in role-playing exercises. View full abstract»

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  • A Field Investigation of the Nostalgia Effect

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 1 - 8
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (281 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Satisfaction is a key indicator of system success, and so has been the subject of much IS research. The nostalgia effect, whereby individuals feel satisfied or dissatisfied when thinking about past goal attainment or failure, has been observed to influence analysts' decisions with respect to ongoing systems development. The Yield Shift Theory (YST) of Satisfaction offers an explanation for the nostalgia effect as a function of changes in an individual's active goal set. This paper reports on an exploratory field investigation of nostalgia effect among 105 working IS/IT professionals in India reflecting on past collaboration experiences. The study revealed a measurable nostalgia effect, and revealed a strong association between satisfaction responses and the antecedents proposed by Yield Shift Theory. View full abstract»

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  • A Team Mental Model Perspective of Pre-Quantitative Risk

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 1 - 10
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (482 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This study was conducted to better understand how teams conceptualize risk before it can be quantified, and the processes by which a team forms a shared mental model of this pre-quantitative risk. Using an extreme case, this study analyzes seven months of team meeting transcripts, covering the entire lifetime of the team. Through an analysis of team discussions, a rich and varied structural model of risk emerges that goes significantly beyond classical representations of risk as the product of a negative consequence and a probability. In addition to those two fundamental components, the team conceptualization includes the ability to influence outcomes and probabilities, networks of goals, interaction effects, and qualitative judgments about the acceptability of risk, all affected by associated uncertainties. In moving from individual to team mental models, team members employ a number of strategies to gain group recognition of risks and to resolve or accept differences. View full abstract»

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  • Cognitive Load in Collaboration - Brainstorming

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 1 - 9
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (247 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Designing collaboration support is a complex social technical task. One of the key production factors in collaboration is cognitive effort. Understanding the cognitive load involved in collaborative tasks is therefore important to support the design of collaboration support. In this paper we derive a framework of cognitive activities involved in brainstorming, a very common and well-studied collaborative task. The framework is based on an overview of brainstorming techniques, and literature on brainstorming. Based on the framework, several techniques to reduce cognitive load from education literature are revised, and we discuss their implications for the design of brainstorming tools. The paper ends with a reflection on the use and implications of the framework. View full abstract»

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  • Developing Collaboration Awareness Support from a Cognitive Perspective

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 1 - 10
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (393 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper discusses collaboration awareness from a cognitive perspective. Several models of the cognitive process are reviewed to distill awareness drivers that, when regarded in the collaboration context, set up a comprehensive view of collaboration awareness. Our major research goal is developing collaboration awareness support taking into consideration the need to provide awareness about the group but also the need to preserve cognitive load. The selected case study involved brainstorming. We developed a brainstorming tool having a collaboration awareness component that automatically balances the parallel production of ideas and the cognitive stimulation of users by reading the others' ideas. This balance is based on a set of heuristics regarding task switching and cognitive load. The experimental results indicate the component increased the production of ideas by 9.6%, while giving users 54.7% more time to type ideas without being interrupted. These results suggest the collaboration awareness component could effectively balance individual and group work. These results contribute to improve awareness support in collaboration technology. View full abstract»

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  • The Role of Group Cognition in Enterprise Architecting

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 1 - 10
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (369 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Enterprise architecture (EA) models the desired relationships between business processes and technology. Enterprise "architecting" is the process of developing and maintaining the EA. The goal of EA is to align business process and IT for the effective execution of business strategy and the efficient implementation of the associated systems. Thus, the architecting process involves many stakeholders (e.g., architects, IT staff, and business staff) with very diverse perspectives, making coordination of architecting work daunting. Despite their critical importance to EA success, coordination and governance in EA have received very little attention in the literature. In this paper we report on a study based on semi-structured interviews of CIO's, chief architects, technical architects, IT staff, business stakeholders and EA consultants. The focus of the study was to better understand the coordination challenges and best practices leading to EA success. Our results show that various forms of group cognition play a critical role in the effective coordination of architecting. View full abstract»

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  • Antecedents of ISD Offshoring Outcomes: Exploring Differences between India and China

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 1 - 10
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (343 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Prior research in IS offshoring has highlighted issues in software development projects arising from differences in culture, from status differences and resource inequalities, as well as from asset-related characteristics. Based on Practice Theory and Transaction Cost Economics, we integrate these three perspectives into a single research model explaining the relation between the outcome of offshore ISD projects and cultural, social, and asset-related characteristics of the projects. We substantiate our model with a multiple-case study in two settings in which German companies have offshored ISD projects to India and China. Thereby, we also address a severe drawback of contemporary intercultural IS offshoring research: the neglect of China as the most rapidly growing IS offshoring location at present. View full abstract»

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  • On Bilateral Effort Contribution to IT Outsourcing

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 1 - 8
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (272 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The success of an IT outsourcing project depends crucially on the close collaboration between both the outsourcing organization and the service provider. In this paper, we present a model to study the effort contribution from the two parties during the IT outsourcing process. The model incorporates two important and commonly observed features: 1) the true quality of the delivered project is unobservable, and 2) the outsourcing organization tends to downplay the quality of the project upon its delivery. The model is solved as a four-stage dynamic bilateral effort contribution game, and the results shed more lights on the interactions and dynamics between various parties during the IT outsourcing process. View full abstract»

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