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Microwave and Millimeter-Wave Monolithic Circuits Symposium, 1991. Digest of Papers, IEEE 1991

Date 10-11 June 1991

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Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 28
  • Microwave and millimeter-wave monolithic circuit technology, its history and future

    Publication Year: 1991 , Page(s): 1 - 2
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (103 KB)  

    The history of the Microwave and Millimeter-Wave Monolithic Circuits (MMWMC) Symposium is reviewed, with particular emphasis on how it has reflected significant technological progress over the past decade. Works reported at past MMWMC symposia are utilized to highlight the technology advances. Emphasis at previous symposia has been on demonstrated circuit data from research performance results through early integrated component production.<> View full abstract»

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  • FM-CW radar on a single GaAs/AlGaAs HBT MMIC chip

    Publication Year: 1991 , Page(s): 3 - 6
    Cited by:  Papers (5)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (188 KB)  

    A novel low-power FM-CW radar on a single chip has been implemented using GaAs/AlGaAs HBT (heterojunction bipolar transistor) technology. An innovative electronic circulator allows operation with a single antenna at C-band. In addition, the chip contains a voltage-controlled oscillator, transmitter amplifier, and receiver mixer with proper filtering. The chip measures 1*2*0.25 mm and operates from a single +5 V supply. In order to minimize cost, a process featuring a relaxed 3 mu m emitter size was used, achieving an f/sub t/ of 24 GHz. Via holes were not used. Potential applications for the chip include range and velocity discriminating fuzes, sensors, and altimeter functions.<> View full abstract»

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  • Single-chip FM-CW radar low-cost production test

    Publication Year: 1991 , Page(s): 7 - 10
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (232 KB)  

    In order to realize the low product cost potential of a single-chip FM-CW radar MMIC (monolithic microwave integrated circuit), an innovative production testing concept is developed in which the complete transmit/receive transfer function is verified in under one minute using the self-generated microwave signal in a simulated radar range environment. The test acceptance criteria are related to fundamental radar module specifications. The test environment, test acceptance criteria, and data storage are controlled by a personal computer. A text example is given.<> View full abstract»

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  • A Ka-band MMIC array feed transmitter for deep space applications

    Publication Year: 1991 , Page(s): 11 - 14
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (357 KB)  

    A Ka-band solid-state transmitter capable of power greater than 5 W is being developed. The transmitter consists of an array of 21 elements each driven by a single stage MMIC (monolithic microwave integrated circuit) power amplifier, a MMIC three-stage preamplifier, and a MMIC four bit phase shifter. The design of the array, measurements of the antenna pattern of the full array, and an electronically beam steered subarray are reported.<> View full abstract»

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  • A high power K/Ka-band monolithic T/R switch

    Publication Year: 1991 , Page(s): 15 - 18
    Cited by:  Papers (13)  |  Patents (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (198 KB)  

    A high-power K/Ka-band MESFET switch monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) has been developed for use in transmit/receive (T/R) modules. The switch demonstrates 0.2 dB insertion loss compression with 30 dBm input power, 12 dB higher than previously reported for K/Ka-band MESFET switches. Also, no isolation degradation was apparent with up to 28 dBm input power, a 13 dB improvement over the same previously demonstrated switches. A combination of techniques was used to yield higher power handling while preserving low loss and high isolation. These circuit techniques include the use of stacked MESFETs with large peripheries to improve power handling and transmission line transformers to minimize loss and maintain high isolation.<> View full abstract»

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  • A compact, monolithic radiofrequency demodulator-modulator for 64-QAM digital radio links

    Publication Year: 1991 , Page(s): 19 - 22
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (247 KB)  

    The design, fabrication, and performance of a GaAs monolithic radiofrequency demodulator with phase and amplitude trimming in the quadrature coupler and balanced mixers in the 5.9-8.5 GHz range is described. This circuit includes amplitude and phase trimming circuits, two single balanced mixers, couplers, and a quadrature phase comparator. The design is such that the same chip can be used either as a direct 64 QAM (quadrature amplitude modulation) demodulator or a modulator. The small chip size is 2.7 mm*3.65 mm.<> View full abstract»

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  • A 10-14 GHz quenchable MMIC oscillator

    Publication Year: 1991 , Page(s): 23 - 26
    Cited by:  Papers (2)  |  Patents (5)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (269 KB)  

    A wideband negative-resistance MMIC (monolithic microwave integrated circuit) oscillator chip has been designed and tested for fast switching DRO (dielectric resonator oscillator) and VCO (voltage-controlled oscillator) applications. This MMIC has an on-chip quench circuit which allows for very fast switching of the oscillator without affecting the active device bias. The MMIC, which also has an on-chip resistive heater section located in close proximity to the active device, minimizes frequency drift due to temperature variations. The switching performance was measured with the chip configured as a DRO; its frequency settled within 0.6 MHz of the final frequency in only 0.5 mu s. This MMIC configured as a VCO achieved wideband tuning from 10 to 14 GHz.<> View full abstract»

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  • Micromachined microwave actuator (MIMAC) technology-a new tuning approach for microwave integrated circuits

    Publication Year: 1991 , Page(s): 27 - 30
    Cited by:  Papers (40)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (514 KB)  

    The authors describe a novel approach to the realization of tunable/variable III-V planar microwave integrated circuits, which uses micromachined electrostatically controlled actuator technology. This technology is potentially compatible with conventional MMIC (monolithic microwave integrated circuit) fabrication techniques, and allows precise positioning and re-positioning of metal conductors on an insulating substrate after fabrication is complete. A variety of structures has been fabricated, including electrostatic micro-motors, rotating microwave switches, and variable interdigitated capacitors. A rotating microwave transmission line switch exhibited less than 0.5 dB insertion loss and greater than 35 dB isolation from DC to 45 GHz. A variable interdigitated capacitor exhibited a variation from 35 fF to 100 fF.<> View full abstract»

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  • Military applications of MMICs

    Publication Year: 1991 , Page(s): 31 - 34
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (361 KB)  

    The author reviews the status of the microwave and millimeter wave monolithic integrated circuits (MIMIC) program by describing some of its current and planned insertions into Department of Defense systems. He surveys smart weapons, electronic warfare, radars, and communications. He points out that MIMIC technology has already found its way into numerous military applications. Some fielded systems are currently using chips from MIMIC production lines.<> View full abstract»

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  • Octave S/C-band MMIC T/R modules for multi-function phased arrays

    Publication Year: 1991 , Page(s): 35 - 38
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (370 KB)  

    A complex wideband transmit/receive (T/R) module that has achieved performance levels superior to that of any MMIC (monolithic microwave integrated circuit) module is described. Performance across an octave 3.0 to 6.0 GHz band includes a power output of 21 W at S-band and 19 at C-band, a noise figure of 3.9 to 5.0 dB, 30 to 38 dB of receive gain, 25 to 26 dBm IP/sub 3/, 40 dB of gain control in 256 steps, dual receive channels with independent amplitude and phase control, and an 8-bit phase shifter with less than one degree calibrated RMS (root mean square) phase error. Total GaAs area is 146 mm/sup 2/ with 170 mm of total gate periphery. The module incorporates a compact digital interface, requires only three supply voltages, and utilizes advanced packing techniques, resulting in a size compatible with a grating lobe free grid spacing.<> View full abstract»

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  • Integrated digitally controlled 6-bit phase shifter, 4-bit attenuator, and T/R switch using multifunction self aligned gate process

    Publication Year: 1991 , Page(s): 39 - 42
    Cited by:  Papers (2)  |  Patents (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (289 KB)  

    A monolithic microwave and digital integrated circuit (MMDIC) consisting of a 12-b serial-to-parallel converter, 6-b phase shifter, 4-b attenuator, and a single-pole double-throw (SPDT) switch has been designed and fabricated using the standard multifunction self-aligned gate (MSAG) process, with a full functional yield of over 27%. By combining digital circuitry with these microwave control circuits, the number of control lines is reduced from 16 to 3. The on-chip combination of multiple circuit functions, including both digital and microwave, not only simplifies the bonding connections, but also reduces the subsystem cost, and increases its reliability.<> View full abstract»

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  • A monolithic Ka-band sub-harmonically pumped frequency converter

    Publication Year: 1991 , Page(s): 43 - 46
    Cited by:  Papers (3)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (216 KB)  

    A GaAs monolithic subharmonically pumped (SHP) Ka-band frequency converter has been developed. The complete frequency converter monolithic millimeter-wave integrated circuit (MMIC), having six microwave ports, consists of an SP2T RF switch, LO (local oscillator) buffer amplifier, anti-parallel diode mixer, three-stage IF (intermediate frequency) amplifier, and an SP3T IF switch. To minimize circuit cost, the converter was fabricated with conventional MMIC material and processing. The frequency converter exhibited a conversion gain of 8 dB and a single sideband noise figure of 20 dB. This IC is the first demonstrated monolithic Ka-band SHP frequency converter and has a higher level of integration than previous MMIC SHP mixers.<> View full abstract»

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  • 35 GHz InGaAs HEMT MMIC downconverter

    Publication Year: 1991 , Page(s): 47 - 50
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (226 KB)  

    The design and development of a 35 GHz HEMT (high electron mobility transistor) MMIC (monolithic microwave integrated circuit) downconverter are reported. This completely monolithic chip consists of a balanced two-stage low-noise amplifier (LNA) cascaded with a singly balanced (HEMT compatible) diode mixer. Conversion gain of 5 dB over a 20 to 100 MHz IF (intermediate frequency) output with an RF frequency of 35 GHz and an LO (local oscillator) frequency=RF+IF has been measured. In addition to the downconverter macrocell, the LNA and mixer designs were fabricated as individual microcells. The LNA has demonstrated state-of-the-art performance: the measured noise figure from 34 to 40 GHz is less than 2.8 dB. Associated gain is 14.0+/-0.4 dB over a 30 to 40 GHz bandwidth. Input and output voltage standing wave ratio is better than 1.2:1. The singly balanced mixer exhibited conversion loss of less than 5 dB.<> View full abstract»

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  • MM-wave MIMIC receiver components

    Publication Year: 1991 , Page(s): 51 - 54
    Cited by:  Papers (20)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (273 KB)  

    Monolithic W-band amplifiers and a novel W-band mixer fabricated using a 0.1 mu m pseudomorphic MODFET technology are presented. Single-stage W-band amplifiers delivered 8.5-dB gain; four-stage units showed 23-dB maximum gain or 4.5-dB noise figure, 21.7-dB associated gain. Monolithic W-band mixers have shown 11.8 dB conversion loss.<> View full abstract»

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  • A W-band monolithic pseudomorphic InGaAs HEMT downconverter

    Publication Year: 1991 , Page(s): 55 - 58
    Cited by:  Papers (11)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (232 KB)  

    The design, fabrication, and evaluation of a fully integrated W-band monolithic downconverter based on an InGaAs pseudomorphic high-electron-mobility transistor (PHEMT) are presented. The downconverter consists of a two-stage low-noise amplifier (LNA) and a singly balanced HEMT gate diode mixer. Measured results of the complete downconverter show a conversion gain of 5.3 dB and a noise figure of 6.8 dB at 94 GHz. The whole downconverter is a first pass design and has a high circuit yield. Furthermore, this is the first reported monolithic downconverter in the W-band frequency range, and represents the state-of-the-art in monolithic millimeter-wave technology.<> View full abstract»

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  • Commercial GaAs MMIC applications

    Publication Year: 1991 , Page(s): 59 - 60
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (94 KB)  

    It is pointed out that the future of the GaAs MMIC (monolithic microwave integrated circuit) industry is in the commercial sector. There is a cornucopia of high volume applications, such as DBS (direct broadcast satellite) cellular telephone, PCM (pulse code modulation), fiber optics, and GPS (Global Positioning System) that are targets for cost-effective GaAs MMIC solutions. It is concluded that the key to success is the ability to produce functional circuits in high volume at low cost. To be successful takes a shift in emphasis from low volume, high-selling-price 'jewelry' applications, to the rigors and discipline of high volume manufacture.<> View full abstract»

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  • A 2 GHz enhancement mode GaAs down converter IC for satellite TV tuner

    Publication Year: 1991 , Page(s): 61 - 64
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (212 KB)  

    A fully integrated 2 GHz down-converter IC has been designed and fabricated for satellite TV application using an enhancement mode GaAs foundry process. Its internal oscillator covers a 1.2 GHz bandwidth that makes it possible to receive the extended satellite TV band from 950 MHz to 2 GHz. The LO (local oscillator) power leakage is greatly reduced as compared to a discrete circuit: it is about -40 dBm at the RF input and less than -30 dBm at the IF (intermediate frequency) output. This IC operates under a single 5 V supply voltage and its performance is an outstanding trade-off between noise, linearity, power consumption, and simplicity of implementation. It is encapsulated in a standard low-cost plastic package.<> View full abstract»

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  • X-band MMIC amplifier with pulse-doped GaAs MESFETs

    Publication Year: 1991 , Page(s): 65 - 68
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (260 KB)  

    An X-band monolithic low-noise amplifier (LNA) with 0.5- mu m-gate pulse-doped GaAs MESFETs was successfully demonstrated for a direct broadcast satellite (DBS) converter. This LNA shows excellent VSWR (voltage standing wave ratio) matches of under 1.4 as well as a noise figure of 1.67 dB and a gain of 24 dB at 12 GHz. The yield of chips within microwave specifications is 62.5%.<> View full abstract»

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  • A new planar double-double balanced MMIC mixer structure

    Publication Year: 1991 , Page(s): 69 - 72
    Cited by:  Papers (6)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (243 KB)  

    Coplanar waveguides, slot lines, and coplanar strips are combined to realize a MMIC (monolithic microwave integrated circuit) double-double balanced mixer (DDBM) in which all circuitry is on the top side of the substrate and no via holes are required. The DDBM exhibits RF, LO (local oscillator) and IF (intermediate frequency) bandwidths of 6-20 GHz, 8-18 GHz and 2-7 GHz, respectively, with conversion loss ranging between 6.2 and 9.8 dB, and RF to IF, LO to IF and LO to RF isolations all greater than 20 dB. The mixer was designed analytically using the harmonic balance method to assess key performance parameters.<> View full abstract»

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  • An HBT MMIC wideband VCO

    Publication Year: 1991 , Page(s): 73 - 76
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (189 KB)  

    A wideband MMIC (monolithic microwave integrated circuit) voltage controlled oscillator (VCO) has been developed using AlGaAs-GaAs heterojunction bipolar transistors (HBTs). Test results indicate a very wide tuning range of 7 to 15 GHz, with a minimum output power of 9 dBm. This MMIC also exhibits low power dissipation (5 V and 25 mA) and excellent phase noise (75 dBc/Hz at 100 kHz) for a broadband VCO. In addition to the basic oscillator this MMIC also includes a buffer amplifier to provide better load isolation and power output stability. All the required biasing and matching circuitry except for the resonator is contained within a chip that measures 30*40 mils (0.8 mm+or-1 mm).<> View full abstract»

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  • A class of monolithic HBT multipliers

    Publication Year: 1991 , Page(s): 77 - 80
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (249 KB)  

    Two types of monolithic multipliers have been developed using current AlGaAs HBT (heterojunction bipolar transistor) technology. Both circuits have an intended input frequency range of 10 MHz to 1.0 GHz. Preliminary wafer probe measurements indicate that the even order multiplier achieves 45 dB of fundamental rejection and 22 dB conversion loss at 2.5 GHz (10th harmonic), consuming 175 mW. The odd order multiplier exhibited 21 dB of conversion loss at 10 GHz (10th harmonic) and 35 dB at 21 GHz (21st harmonic), dissipating 315 mW. These circuits offer significant improvement in bandwidth, output power and implementation cost compared to existing diode-based MIC (microwave integrated circuit) or MMIC (monolithic microwave integrated circuit) MESFET frequency multipliers.<> View full abstract»

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  • Monolithic ultra-broadband transimpedance amplifiers using AlGaAs/GaAs HBTs

    Publication Year: 1991 , Page(s): 81 - 84
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    Monolithic ultra-broad band transimpedance amplifiers have been developed using AlGaAs/GaAs HBTs (heterojunction bipolar transistors). The amplifiers have exhibited DC to 13.4-GHz bandwidth, with an 18.1-dB gain and a 49.8-dB Omega transimpedance. The standard deviations in gain and 3-dB roll-off bandwidth over 2-in wafers were as small as 0.42 dB and 0.47 GHz, respectively. These results have been brought about by optimized circuit design considering large signal operation and an affordable HBT fabrication process using a self-aligned method. Excellent 10 Gb/s NRZ (nonreturn to zero) pulse response has confirmed that the amplifiers are adapted to 10 Gb/s optical transmission systems.<> View full abstract»

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  • GaAs HBT wideband and low power consumption amplifiers to 24 GHz

    Publication Year: 1991 , Page(s): 85 - 88
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (328 KB)  

    The authors report on the design and performance of a 2-24-GHz distributed matrix amplifier and a 1-20-GHz two-stage Darlington coupled amplifier based on an advanced HBT (heterojunction bipolar transistor) MBE (molecular beam epitaxy) profile which increased the bandwidth response of the distributed and Darlington amplifiers by providing lower base-emitter and collector-base capacitances. The matrix amplifiers have 9.5-dB nominal gain and a 3-dB bandwidth to 24 G-Hz. It is the highest bandwidth reported for an HBT distributed amplifier. The input and output VSWRs (voltage standing wave ratios) are less than 1.5:1 and 2.0:1, respectively. The total power consumed is less than 60 mW. The chip size measures 2.5*2.5 mm. The two-stage Darlington amplifier has 7-dB gain and 3-dB bandwidth to 20 GHz. The input and output VSWRs are less than 1.5:1 and 2.3:1, respectively. This amplifier consumes 380 mW of power and has a chip size of 1.66*1.05 mm.<> View full abstract»

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  • An X-band high-efficiency ion-implanted MMIC power amplifier

    Publication Year: 1991 , Page(s): 89 - 91
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (254 KB)  

    A state-of-the-art X-band high-efficiency monolithic power amplifier has been demonstrated. An average output power of 3.6 W at an average 41% power-added efficiency over a 40% bandwidth from 7.0 to 10.5 GHz has been achieved. An excellent average power density of 500 mW/mm and peak power density of 550 mW/mm have been measured across this bandwidth.<> View full abstract»

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  • A 4 watt high efficiency 15-18 GHz power MMIC

    Publication Year: 1991 , Page(s): 93 - 96
    Cited by:  Papers (1)  |  Patents (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (222 KB)  

    A two-stage Ku-band monolithic power amplifier is reported. The MMIC (monolithic microwave integrated circuit) incorporates a full interstage matching network and a partial input matching network on the chip. The amplifier delivers 4 W of power, 10 to 13 dB of gain, and more than 20% power added efficiency at 2 dB gain compression. This amplifier can be tuned for a 1 GHz instantaneous bandwidth anywhere in the 15-18 GHz band. A 10-W, 20-dB gain power module using five MMICs demonstrates the usefulness of the MMIC as a building block for higher-power amplifiers.<> View full abstract»

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