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Mixed and Augmented Reality - Arts, Media, and Humanities (ISMAR-AMH), 2010 IEEE International Symposium On

Date 13-16 Oct. 2010

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  • [Title page]

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): i
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  • [Copyright notice]

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): ii
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  • Contents

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): iii - iv
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  • Supporting organizations

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): v
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  • From the symposium general chairs

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): vi
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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  • From the Arts, media, & humanities program chairs

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): vii
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  • IEEE Visualization and Graphics Technical Committee (VGTC)

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): viii
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  • Task force on Human Centered Computing (TFHCC)

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): ix
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  • Conference committee

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): x
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  • International Program Committee and Reviewers

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): xi - xiii
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  • Augmenting reality for medicine, training, presence and telepresence

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): xiv
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  • Augmented dreams

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): xv
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  • [Blank page]

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 1
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  • Papers

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 1
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  • [Blank page]

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 2
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  • ParticipArt: Exploring participation in interactive art installations

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 3 - 10
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1101 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    ParticipART is an initiative aimed at exploring participation in interactive works using ubiquitous computing and mixed reality. It supports and analyses work of artists and creative practitioners incorporating or reflecting on participatory processes to support new roles and forms of engagement for art participants. We aim at proposing a space for discussion that can enliven and enrich the dialogue between human-computer interaction and the creative practices. We present several works that have been exhibited and experienced. The works are used to reflect on the different participative strategies and the role of interaction technologies: enabling authorship, affording connectivity, interacting with artificial beings, reinterpreting the visitor world, and engaging in performative acts. View full abstract»

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  • Scenario: Co-evolution, shared autonomy and mixed reality

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 11 - 18
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2807 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper describes the Australian Research Council funded project Scenario, conducted at the iCinema Research Centre, University of New South Wales. Realized through interdisciplinary research, involving the domains of machine learning, interactive narrative and new media art, Scenario creates a mixed reality (MR) environment, surrounding the user within a 360-degree stereoscopic space, in which she can interact with digital characters that have a level of autonomy. Through its discussion of the aesthetics and technological architecture of Scenario the paper enters into an explanation of what is termed `co-evolutionary' narrative, a function of the interactive relationship formed between a human user and an autonomous digital character. Understanding interaction as co-evolution the Scenario project enlists the philosophy of Gilles Deleuze and Manual DeLanda in order to propose interaction as a dynamic two-way process. The paper begins to unpack this theoretical framework for understanding interaction. View full abstract»

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  • Thinking inside the box: Making meaning in a Handheld AR experience

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 19 - 26
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3376 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Augmented Reality (AR) applications and experiences delivered on mobile devices are an emerging class of technologies that are gathering momentum in the areas of gaming, tourism, education and marketing. In this paper we analyze [inbox], an immersive Handheld Augmented Reality (HAR) experience that takes place inside a shipping container, and contains many elements of each of these genres of HAR experiences. We discuss the holistic design approach we used in creating this experience. As well as highlight specific methods that leverage the capabilities of HAR to communicate specific concepts and information, while simultaneously allowing for multiple user interpretations. Finally we suggest a course of research that is likely to yield consistent design methodologies appropriate across all genres of HAR experiences. View full abstract»

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  • “Wonder Turner” and “The Amazing Cinemagician” augmented reality and mixed reality art installations

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 27 - 32
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (8181 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper discusses the approach, evolution and exhibition of the augmented reality art installation Wonder Turner and mixed reality work The Amazing Cinemagician at the Ontario Science Centre Idea Gallery from May 29 through September 6, 2010 in Toronto, Canada, by artist and researcher Helen Papagiannis. Both interactive artworks are featured in the exhibition entitled, The Amazing Cinemagician: New Media Meets Victorian Magic by Helen Papagiannis in association with the Augmented Reality Lab at York University. View full abstract»

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  • OutRun: Exploring seamful design in the development of an augmented reality art project

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 33 - 38
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (924 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper outlines the development process of an augmented reality video game prototype that combines a classic arcade driving game with a real world vehicle. In this project the user, or driver, maneuvers the car-shaped arcade cabinet through actual physical space using a screen as a navigational guide which renders the real world in the style of an 8-bit video game. This case study is presented as a seamful augmented reality (AR) system: a project that exploits inevitable technical limitations of AR. We propose that the concept of seamfulness has important design implications for both AR and electronic media art projects and illustrate this through a description of the OutRun system development process. View full abstract»

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  • The Westwood Experience: Connecting story to locations via Mixed Reality

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 39 - 46
    Cited by:  Papers (9)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2274 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The Westwood Experience is a location-based narrative using Mixed Reality effects to connect participants to unique and evocative real locations, bridging the gap between the real and story worlds. This paper describes the experience and a detailed evaluation of it. The experience itself centers around a narrative told by the “mayor” of Westwood. He tells a love story from his youth when he first came to Westwood, and intermixes the story with historical information. Most of this story is told on a mobile computer, using Mixed Reality and video for illustration. We evaluate the experience both quantitatively and qualitatively to find lessons learned about the experience itself and general guidelines for this type of experience. The analysis and guidelines from our evaluation are grouped into three categories: narration in mobile environments, social dynamics, and Mixed Reality effects. View full abstract»

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  • An integrated design flow in user interface and interaction for enhancing mobile AR gaming experiences

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 47 - 52
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1149 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Interaction is a prominent feature that distinguishes computer (video) games from other kinds of entertainment. Given that Augmented Reality (AR) presentations enable the creation of user interactions that expand traditional HCI from 2D to 3D spaces, this offer an ideal opportunity for game developers to design more playful and interesting mobile AR games that embed various interaction forms. This paper introduces a mobile AR cooking game that is based on the integration of adopted AR interaction and user interface principles in its design flow. These embedded interactions are designed with considerations and spatial mappings to real cooking mechanisms in order to provide a unique gaming experience and increased engagement for a better overall AR interaction on the multimodal mobile device. View full abstract»

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  • Flavor visualization: Taste guidance in co-cooking system for coexistence

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 53 - 60
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (690 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Currently we are developing a co-cooking system that helps users to make similar tasting dishes, even though users may all be in remote locations and potentially cooking at different times. Because it is difficult to explain verbally or through written media about cooking taste in the co-cooking interface system, we've researched a flavor visualization module that guides unique tastes with graphical information in the co-cooking interface system. To achieve this, firstly, we conducted literature studies to clarify the flavor and visualization. We executed user studies to extract linguistic vocabularies of flavor expressions and sensibility vocabularies from each of the expression elements of visualization and flavor. We then built connections between sensibility vocabularies from the expression elements in visualization and flavor through literature studies and user interviews. Based on this relationship grouping work, we could make a relationship table of flavor and visualization expressions that broadly contains the relationships between flavor expressions and visual expressions. We could then realize a real-time working prototype based on the relationship mapping table that we studied. This flavor visualization can tackle the task of augmenting, through cross modal interactions, feelings of tastes by visual means. In further research, we are thinking flavor visualization will express individual cooking signatures, as derived from a personal history of taste and physical cooking habits. Also, it can visualize cooking tastes that express an individual's unique taste signatures for a more precise and emotionally involved remote co-cooking experience. Through this, we are expecting possibilities for fostering intimacy and family communication using the memory triggers that come from tastes. We hope this will make us emotionally feel coexistent in separated locations, and even different times, by facilitating conversation and other sensory communication with family - - and friends. View full abstract»

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  • AMH posters

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 61 - 62
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  • Reality through the invisible interface

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 63 - 64
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (207 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Developments in retinal projection and contact lens display promise an eventual seamless experience of augmented and virtual realities. But as with the inception of all immersive technologies, this raises the fearful spectre of an illusionism so credible as to realise the quintessential post-modern dilemma: total uncertainty between reality and fiction. This paper explores the emerging possibilities that future AR interfaces might offer and considers the resulting implications for actual reality. Tracing a brief history of the imposturous imagery and outlining anxieties that immersive content and technologies have raised, I contend that reality has always been uncertain. Furthermore I assert that human perceptions of reality develop and adapt alongside the technologies that mimic it. View full abstract»

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