By Topic

Information Visualisation (IV), 2010 14th International Conference

Date 26-29 July 2010

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 106
  • [Front cover]

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): C1
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (699 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • [Title page i]

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): i
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (14 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • [Title page iii]

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): iii
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (83 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • [Copyright notice]

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): iv
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (109 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): v - xii
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (151 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Preface

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): xiii
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (100 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Organizing & Liaison Committee

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): xv - xviii
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (94 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Program Committee

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): xix - xx
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (97 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • list-reviewer

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): xxi - xxii
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (57 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Automatic Application of the Data-State Model in Data-Flow Contexts

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 5 - 10
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (448 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The data-state and data-flow models of information visualization are known to be expressively equivalent. Each model is most effective for different combinations of analysis processes and data characteristics. Visualization frameworks tend to either (1) work within a single model or (2) permit either model in separate sub-frameworks. In either case, converting between the two models falls entirely to the programmer. The theoretical basis for automatic translation between the two models was established by Chi. However, that process is insufficiently specified to be directly implemented. This paper characterizes the practical advantages of the data-state model. This is used to identify when such a transformation is beneficial. It then expands on Chi's theoretical framework to provide the tools for translating visualization program fragments from the data-flow to the data-state model. A partial implementation of the expanded theory is described for the Stencil visualization environment. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A Visualization Technique for Access Patterns and Link Structures of Web Sites

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 11 - 16
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (637 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    There have been two types of Web visualization techniques: visualization of Web sites themselves based on such as link structures or lexical contents, and visualization of browsers' behaviors. We think that integration of such two visualization techniques is very useful for Web site management, and therefore we are currently studying on visualization of access pattern and link structure on a single screen. This paper presents a Web visualization technique using our own multiple-category-embedded graph visualization technique. The presented technique constructs link structures using crawler software, and access patterns from access log files. It then integrates them and visualizes by our graph visualization technique. We expect that users can visually understand the relationship between access patterns and link structures, and utilize the knowledge for design and management of Web sites. This paper shows our case study and discusses typical access patterns we observed by the technique. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A 3D Visualization Technique for Large Scale Time-Varying Data

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 17 - 22
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (776 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We represent time-varying data as polyline charts very often. At the same time, we often need to observe hundreds or even thousands of time-varying values in one chart. However, it is often difficult to understand such large-scale time-varying if all the values are drawn in a single polyline chart. This paper presents a polyline-based 3D time-varying data visualization technique. The technique places a set of polylines in the 3D space, where the X-axis denotes time, the Y-axis denotes values, and the polylines are arranged along the Z-axis. It provides two views: the first viewpoint has a view direction along Y-axis, and the second viewpoint has a view direction along Z-axis. The technique displays the overview of the data from the first viewpoint, and the detail of the specific parts of the data from the second viewpoint. It also detects frequent or outlier patterns by applying SAX (Symbolic Aggregate approXimation), and indicates them so that users can discover such characteristic patterns. This paper shows several interesting visualization examples to demonstrate the effectiveness of the presented technique. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Drawing Clustered Bipartite Graphs in Multi-circular Style

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 23 - 28
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1365 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Bipartite graphs are often used to illustrate relationships between two sets of data, such as web pages and visitors. At the same time, information is often organized hierarchically, for example, web pages are divided into directories by their contents. The hierarchical structures are useful for analyzing information. Graphs with both a bipartite structure and a hierarchical structure are called “clustered bipartite graphs.” A new clustered bipartite graphs visualization technique was developed for representing both bipartite and hierarchical structures simultaneously. In this technique, nodes in one set of the bipartite graph, which are leaves of a tree, are arranged in hierarchical multi-circular style. Then, nodes in the other set of the bipartite graph are arranged by the force-directed method. The technique enables step-by-step exploration for large-scale bipartite graphs. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Network Visualization of Human and Machine-Based Educational Standard Assignment

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 29 - 34
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (577 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Rapid growth in the availability of digital libraries of K-12 curriculum, coupled with an increased emphasis on standard-based teaching has led to the development of automated standard assignment tools. To assess the performance of one of those tools and to gain insight into the differences between how human catalogers and automated tools conduct these standard assignments, we explore the use of network modeling and visualization techniques for comparing and contrasting the two. The results show significant differences between the human-based and machine-based network maps. Unlike the machine-based maps, the human-based assignment maps elegantly reflect the rationales and principles of the assignments; i.e., clusters of standards separate along lines of content and pedagogical principles. In addition, humans seem significantly more apt at assigning so-called `methodological' standards. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • The Network Lens: Interactive Exploration of Multivariate Networks Using Visual Filtering

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 35 - 42
    Cited by:  Papers (2)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (616 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Networks are widely used in modeling relational data often comprised of thousands of nodes and edges. This kind of data alone implies a challenge for its visualization as it is hard to avoid clutter of network elements if using traditional node-link diagrams. Moreover, real-life network data sets usually represent objects with a large number of additional attributes that need to be visualized, such as in software engineering, social network analysis, or biochemistry. In this paper, we present a novel approach, called Network Lens, to visualize such attributes in context of the underlying network. Our implementation of the Network Lens is an interactive tool that extends the idea of so-called magic lenses in such a way that users can interactively build and combine various lenses by specifying different attributes and selecting suitable visual representations. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Preserving Coherent Illumination in Style Transfer Functions for Volume Rendering

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 43 - 47
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3060 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Volume rendering has been widely used in different fields where several rendering algorithms have been developed, such as shear-warp, ray casting or splatting. But independently of the rendering method, transfer functions are usually used for mapping values and other properties of the volume into colors. As an improvement of transfer functions, style transfer functions are being used, where sphere maps extracted from artwork are used instead of plain colors. In this paper, we propose an interactive designer that would allow the user to create styles in an easy way, and shade them with just a color or a texture. In addition, it guarantees a coherent illumination, making it possible to easily use style transfer functions to achieve realistic rendering. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Extracting Events from Spatial Time Series

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 48 - 53
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (938 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    An important task in exploration of data about phenomena and processes that develop over time is detection of significant changes that happened to the studied phenomenon. Our research is focused on supporting detection of significant changes, called events, in multiple time series of numeric values. We developed a suite of visual analytics techniques that combines interactive visualizations on time-aware displays and maps with statistical event detection methods implemented in R. We demonstrate the utility of our approach using two large data sets. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • An Interactive Visualization Framework for Time-Series of Web Graphs in a 3D Environment

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 54 - 60
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2769 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We propose an interactive framework for the 3D visualization of the time-series of Web graphs. The purpose of our framework is to enable users to examine the evolution of Web graphs by comparing multiple graphs that have different timings and topics. To achieve this, we provide TimeSlices that are 2D planes to visualize Web graphs in a 3D environment. Users can interactively add new TimeSlices along the timeline, and they can manipulate them to animate Web graphs. Visualized Web graphs on TimeSlices are snapshots of different timings. Moreover, we provide mechanisms to generate and manipulate overlay views and parallel views in the 3D environment to enable Web graphs to be compared. Users can seamlessly change these viewing modes. Our system can also visualize two Web graphs created from different keywords to display the evolutional correlation between them. This system enables us to observe structural and temporal changes in multiple Web graphs such as shifts in influential blogs or power shifts in the diffusion of blogs between topics. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Combining Visual Analytics and Content Based Data Retrieval Technology for Efficient Data Analysis

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 61 - 67
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (27720 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    One of the most useful techniques to help visual data analysis systems is interactive filtering (brushing). However, visualization techniques often suffer from overlap of graphical items and multiple attributes complexity, making visual selection inefficient. In these situations, the benefits of data visualization are not fully observable because the graphical items do not pop up as comprehensive patterns. In this work we propose the use of content-based data retrieval technology combined with visual analytics. The idea is to use the similarity query functionalities provided by metric space systems in order to select regions of the data domain according to user-guidance and interests. After that, the data found in such regions feed multiple visualization workspaces so that the user can inspect the correspondent datasets. Our experiments showed that the methodology can break the visual analysis process into smaller problems (views) and that the views hold the expectations of the analyst according to his/her similarity query selection, improving data perception and analytical possibilities. Our contribution introduces a principle that can be used in all sorts of visualization techniques and systems, this principle can be extended with different kinds of integration visualization-metric-space, and with different metrics, expanding the possibilities of visual data analysis in aspects such as semantics and scalability. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • GVIS: An Integrating Infrastructure for Adaptively Mashing up User Data from Different Sources

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 68 - 72
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (436 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this article we present an infrastructure for creating mash up visual representations of the user profile that combines data from different sources. We explored this approach in the context of Life Long Learning, where different platforms or services are often used to support the learning process. The system is highly configurable and adaptive: data sources, data aggregations, and visualizations can be configured on the fly by the administrative user without changing any part of the software, and have an adaptive behavior based on linear combination of conditions about user or system characteristics. The visual profiles produced can assume different graphical formats and can be bound to different data, automatically adapting to personal preferences, knowledge, and contexts. We applied our infrastructure to a set of federated Learning Management Systems, retrieving information from different sources and creating some indicators of the learning activity. The software we developed provides learners with adaptive indicators of the learning state, and allows instructors to monitor the progress of their learners. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Kinetic Inter-acting: A System for Visual Analysis of Interaction Dynamics

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 73 - 78
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1746 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Interactions are central to our endeavours. Whether in a face-to-face session with a doctor or via one of Web 2.0 applications, the way interactions unfold has an impact on the final outcome of the session. This paper addresses the problem of the development of a visual language and analysis system, enabling visual reasoning about the quality of interactions. The paper presents a system of encoding the way interactions unfold. It presents the foundations of KIA (Kinetic Inter-Acting) visual language and the visual analysis system with this language. The language is then evaluated through comparison with expert judgments when applied to cases in health care. KIA (the language and the analysis system) enables both humans and machines to utilise information about how interactions unfold in order to improve interactions and the processes that depend on them. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Highlighting in Information Visualization: A Survey

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 79 - 85
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (773 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Highlighting was the basic viewing control mechanism in computer graphics and visualization to guide users' attention in reading diagrams, images, graphs and digital texts. As the rapid growth of theory and practice in information visualization, highlighting has extended its role that acts as not only a viewing control, but also an interaction control and a graphic recommendation mechanism in knowledge visualization and visual analytics. In this work, we attempt to give a formal summarization and classification of the existing highlighting methods and techniques that can be applied in Information Visualization, Visual Analytics and Knowledge Visualization. We propose a new three-layer model of highlighting. We discuss the responsibilities of each layer in the different stage of the visual information processing. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Polytree Numbering for Citation Networks Visualisation

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 86 - 91
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1909 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Citation networks form directed acyclic graphs. Visualisation of the reference relationships within the network requires fast determination of ancestor-descendant relationships among the nodes within the digraph. Polytrees (singly connected digraphs) constitute an important class of acyclic digraphs and can be viewed as generalised directed trees where multiple parent nodes are permitted. In this paper, we propose a new ancestral numbering scheme for polytrees that allows fast determination of ancestor-descendant relationships among the nodes without traversal. The scheme is used to index and visualise reference relationships within citation networks. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • OWL Ontology Visualization: Graphical Representations of Properties on the Instance Level

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 92 - 97
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (788 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    For several ontology applications, a combination of classes with their instances, their properties on the class level and on the instance level are from interest. However, the focus of most visualization approaches is on the hierarchical and non-hierarchical relationships on the class level. This paper presents an approach to visualizing datatype properties and object properties on the instance level. For this purpose, three different layouts were developed for the ontology visualization tool Knoocks. Furthermore, the paper discusses results of an evaluation that was motivated to identify which one of these layout versions was preferred by the users. The evaluation should also reveal if the concept of the representation of the properties was understandable for them. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Double Tree: An Advanced KWIC Visualization for Expert Users

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 98 - 103
    Cited by:  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1069 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this paper we present Double Tree, a new visualization of Key Word In Context (KWIC) displays targeted to support linguistic analysis. Inspired by Wattenberg's and Viégas' [1] Word Tree visualization, Double Tree extends the idea of representing KWIC results as trees. We address several issues with Word Trees with respect to the specific demands of linguists and discuss the design decisions and implementation details that we chose for Double Tree. In particular we present our approach for displaying a two-sided tree. We describe details of the layout, including how frequency and linguistic information is incorporated, and what user interaction is supported. We conclude with some consideration on possible next steps for Double Tree. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.