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Sensor Networks, Ubiquitous, and Trustworthy Computing (SUTC), 2010 IEEE International Conference on

Date 7-9 June 2010

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  • [Front cover]

    Page(s): C1
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  • [Title page i]

    Page(s): i
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  • [Title page iii]

    Page(s): iii
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  • [Copyright notice]

    Page(s): iv
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  • Table of contents

    Page(s): v - x
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  • Message from the SUTC 2010 Chairs

    Page(s): xi
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  • Message from the Workshop Co-Chairs of UMC 2010

    Page(s): xii
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  • SUTC 2010 Organizing Committee

    Page(s): xiii - xiv
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  • SUTC 2010 Program Committee

    Page(s): xv - xvii
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  • UMC 2010 Organization

    Page(s): xviii
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  • A Wireless Body Sensor Network for Different Health Related Applications

    Page(s): 1
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (140 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We present an application of an open source platform for wireless body sensor network called DexterNet to the problem of monitoring different subjects. The architecture of the system consists of three layers. At the body sensor layer (BSL), the integrated monitoring of a person's activities, geographic location, and air pollution exposures occurs. At the personal network layer (PNL), a wireless mobile device worn by the person summarizes the sensed data, and provides information feedback. The mobile device communicates wirelessly over the Internet with the third global network layer (GNL), in which a web server provides the following four information services: a clinical module that supports the healthcare management of different health problems cases, a personal health module that supports individual prevention of some health symptoms, a community module that supports participatory sensing, and a health research module that supports the collection of anonymous sensor data for research into the risk factors associated with the given health issues. We illustrate the potential for the system to serve as a comprehensive strategy to manage different health cases . View full abstract»

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  • Desirable Advances in Cyber-Physical System Software Engineering

    Page(s): 2 - 4
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    The scale and complexity of advanced cyberphysical systems (CPSs) are steadily growing. Most newgeneration CPSs being developed or to be developed involve networked embedded computing (NEC) devices. The state of the art in software engineering for such network-based CPSs is weak. Major problems faced are the low quality of networkbased CPS software and the low productivity of CPS software engineers. One type of desirable advance in enhancing the state of the art is to establish high-level programming tools boosting the productivity of software engineers. Here additional types of desirable advance are discussed. Specifically, the establishment of methods and tools for quantitatively analyzable fault tolerance design as well as for design of time-constrained security enforcement is proposed. View full abstract»

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  • Secure Semantic Sensor Web and Pervasive Computing

    Page(s): 5 - 10
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (125 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this paper we discuss issues on developing a secure semantic sensor web. SensorML is the starting point for this work. We explore the layers for a semantic sensor web and discuss security issues. We also discuss secure peer-to-peer computing as it relates to sensor web. View full abstract»

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  • TABS: Link Loss Tolerant Data Routing Protocol for Multi-hop Wireless Sensor Networks

    Page(s): 11 - 18
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (361 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Routing techniques of multi-hop wireless sensor networks try to mask low-power radio properties such as link asymmetry, unidirectionality and unreliability using different techniques like blacklisting, link reliability metrics etc. In addition to associated overhead, these approaches limit routing options. In this paper, we design a novel link loss tolerant data routing protocol, called TABS (Try-Ancestors-Before-Spreading), for multi-hop wireless sensor networks. TABS effectively combines the benefits of wireless broadcast advantages with traditional retransmission based routing while evades route explosion. Also, this protocol instantaneously adapts to network dynamics without periodic link quality maintenance. We evaluate the performance of TABS implementation using TinyOS on a 56-node 802.15.4 radio based test-bed. We analyze TABS performance on dense and sparse networks, and static and dynamic network topologies. TABS shows over 98% success rate to deliver packet between all pair of nodes. In addition, we compare the performance of TABS with that of hop-by-hop retransmission based routing, periodic link quality estimation based routing and the routing that exploits wireless broadcast advantages. View full abstract»

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  • Analysis, Comparison, and Optimization of Routing Protocols for Energy Harvesting Wireless Sensor Networks

    Page(s): 19 - 26
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (384 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Energy harvesting has been steadily gaining interest in the wireless sensor network community. Instead of minimizing the energy consumption and maximizing a network’s operational time, the main challenge in energy harvesting sensor networks is to maximize the utility of the application subject to the harvested energy. One major challenge is to maximize the data delivery rates by exploiting the spatial variations of environmental energy. While there exists a multiplicity of energy-aware routing protocols for sensor networks without energy harvesting capabilities, only a small number of routing protocols have been published which explicitly account for energy harvesting. In this paper, we analyze and compare three state-of-the-art routing algorithms. While the original algorithms assume an idealized medium access control (MAC), a lossless wireless channel and global knowledge, we show that these assumptions lead to delusive results. We detail these findings by showing the influence of a low-power MAC protocol, a realistic wireless channel and the protocol overhead. Moreover, we show how to optimize the parameters of the MAC protocol for a given network configuration. By conducting various evaluations, we identify that our modified version of the R-MPRT algorithm outperforms the evaluated algorithms in scenarios where little energy is harvested from the environment. View full abstract»

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  • Generic Information Transport for Wireless Sensor Networks

    Page(s): 27 - 34
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (324 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A primary functionality of wireless sensor networks (WSNs) is transporting the information acquired by the sensors as per the desired application requirements. The diverse applications supported by WSNs also stipulate a diverse range of reliability requirements for the transport of various information types. The continuous variation of application requirements and dynamic operational perturbations complicates the design of a generic solution for information transport in WSNs. In this paper, we present a new framework for generic information transport (GIT), which considers varied application requirements and evolvable network conditions in WSNs. GIT manages the information and utilizes a probabilistic approach to ensure tunable reliability of information transport. The GIT framework is distributed in nature and performs its operations locally. The simulation results validate the tunability of the GIT framework. In some setups GIT achieves up to 4-5 times reduction in number of transmissions compared to existing approaches. View full abstract»

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  • ASample: Adaptive Spatial Sampling in Wireless Sensor Networks

    Page(s): 35 - 42
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (227 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A prominent application of Wireless Sensor Networks is the monitoring of physical phenomena. The value of the monitored attributes naturally depends on the accuracy of the spatial sampling achieved by the deployed sensors. The monitored phenomena often tend to have unknown spatial distributions at pre-deployment stage, which also change over time. This can detrimentally affect the overall achievable accuracy of monitoring. Consequently, reaching an optimal (accuracy driven) static sensor node deployment is generally not possible, resulting in either under- or over-sampling of signals in space. Our goal is to provide for adaptive spatial sampling. The key challenges consist in identifying the regions of over- or under-sampling and in suggesting the appropriate countermeasures. In this paper, we propose a Voronoi based adaptive spatial sampling (ASample) solution. Our approach removes unnecessary samples from regions of over-sampling and generates additional new sampling locations in the under-sampling regions to fulfill specified accuracy requirements. Simulation results show that ASample significantly and efficiently reduces the mean square error of the achieved measurement accuracy. View full abstract»

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  • Data Caching in Ad Hoc Networks Using Game-Theoretic Analysis

    Page(s): 43 - 49
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (240 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Extensive research has been performed to study selfish data caching in ad hoc networks using game-theoretic analysis. However, due to the caching problem's theoretical root in classic facility location problem and k-median problem, most of the research assumes i), the data items are initially outside of the network, and ii), the caching cost is either a constant or not considered. In this paper, we study a general data caching model in which the data item is initially in the network, and both caching and access cost are distance-dependent in multi-hop ad hoc networks. We first show the studied problem is NP-hard. We construct a pure Nash Equilibrium, in which a node will not deviate its caching strategy if others remain theirs. However, a NE may not guarantee social optimal cost -- due to the selfishness of each node, the price of anarchy, which is the relative cost of the lack of cooperation among nodes, could be as large as $O(N)$, where $N$ is number of nodes in the network. Using an external incentive mechanism based upon a payment model, we construct a Nash Equilibrium wherein social optimal is also achieved. View full abstract»

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  • Reordering for Better Compressibility: Efficient Spatial Sampling in Wireless Sensor Networks

    Page(s): 50 - 57
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (604 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Compressed Sensing (CS) is a novel sampling paradigm that tries to take data-compression concepts down to the sampling layer of a sensory system. It states that discrete compressible signals are recoverable from sub-sampled data, when the data vector is acquired by a special linear transform of the original discrete signal vector. Distributed sampling problems especially in Wireless Sensor Networks (WSN) are good candidates to apply CS and increase sensing efficiency without sacrificing accuracy. In this paper, we discuss how to reorder the samples of a discrete spatial signal vector by defining an alternative permutation of the sensor nodes (SN). Accordingly, we propose a method to enhance CS in WSN through improving signal compressibility by finding a sub-optimal permutation of the SNs. Permutation doesn't involve physical relocation of the SNs. It is a reordering function computed at the sink to gain a more compressible view of the spatial signal. We show that sub-optimal reordering stably maintains a more compressible view of the signal until the state of the environment changes so that another up-to-date reordering has to be computed. Our method can increase signal reconstruction accuracy at the same spatial sampling rate, or recover the state of the operational environment with the same quality at lower spatial sampling rate. Sub-sampling takes place during the interval that our reordered version of the spatial signal remains more compressible than the original signal. View full abstract»

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  • Considerations on Security in ZigBee Networks

    Page(s): 58 - 65
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (445 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    ZigBee outlines a new suite of protocols targeted at low-rate, low-power devices and sensor nodes. ZigBee Specification includes a number of security provisions and options. The security model specified in the Smart Energy Profile seems bound to become the reference security model for most of ZigBee applications. In this paper we review this security model and highlight places where its specification presents concerns and possible inefficiencies in security management. Specifically, we show that the specification does not adequately address the forward security requirement so allowing a number of threats at the routing and application layer. Furthermore, we show inefficiencies in managing both the Network Key and devices certificates. Finally, we make some proposals to address these problems. View full abstract»

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  • Pollution Attack Defense for Coding Based Sensor Storage

    Page(s): 66 - 73
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (258 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We present a novel information theoretic approach to make network coding based storage secure against pollution attacks in sensor networks. The approach is based on a new decoding algorithm which makes it possible to find adversarial blocks using one more encoded block than strictly necessary for decoding. Our scheme fits well to the requirements of sensor networks, because it operates with adding very low computational and communication overhead to source and storage nodes, only the collector node needs to perform some additional computation. Our approach does not apply cryptography, hence it works in environments where no pre-shared keys, secure channels or PKI are available, which is often the case in sensor networks. View full abstract»

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  • User-Based Attestation for Trustworthy Visual Sensor Networks

    Page(s): 74 - 81
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (968 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Camera networks are used for a variety of applications including surveillance, traffic monitoring or elderly care. The shift from analog towards fully digitized systems has considerably increased their capabilities. With large-scale deployments of smart cameras and visual sensor networks, public awareness of privacy issues is increasing. Researchers are addressing these concerns by introducing privacy preserving technologies like content scrambling and encryption. Today's systems however do not provide mechanisms that allow monitored people to verify that a camera system is behaving as advertised by its operators. In this work, we propose to use Trusted Computing to enhance the security of camera systems and, by enabling user-based attestation, give users a simple and intuitive way to check the trustworthiness of cameras. View full abstract»

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  • Hardware Implementation of Symbol Synchronization for Underwater FSK

    Page(s): 82 - 88
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (388 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Symbol synchronization is a critical component in the design of an underwater acoustic modem. Without accurate symbol synchronization, higher bit error rates incur thus reducing the reliability and quality of service of the wireless network. This paper provides a practical description of the design choices and hardware implementation details required to build a compact and efficient symbol synchronizer suitable for a short-range, low-power underwater FSK acoustic modem. Experimental results show the design meets the timing requirements of the underwater modem and provides accurate synchronization while consuming only 0.240W power in a Spartan3 xc3s2000 FPGA. View full abstract»

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  • Overhearing Gain Analysis in Low-Traffic CDMA Wireless Sensor Networks

    Page(s): 89 - 94
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (338 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    There have been trends in using spread spectrum channel accessing techniques in wireless sensor networks to mitigate the effect of potential collisions in concurrent transmissions and to increase the throughput as well as countering jamming-like noises. Overhearing of the data has been previously analyzed in cellular CDMA networks as this technique was first introduced for mobile communications with multiple transmitting users sending their data to a single base station which controls their transmission power. But sensor (and ad hoc) networks are usually devoid of any coordinating devices and the transmission is usually done toward different local destinations using distributed power controlling methods. This paper provides a systematic analysis of overhearing performance in low-traffic sensor networks especially when the sensing point is located somewhere at the middle of the network which is not necessarily near the sink. The distributed code assignment which is a key issue in infrastructureless CDMA networks has been taken into account in the development of a theoretical model. The result of this analysis shows that the higher the number of used codes, the higher is the gain of overhearing. Thus using this parameter, the network designer has statistical control over the amount of potential overheard data. We have also developed simulations of the proposed model and the results support the predictions of the theoretical model. View full abstract»

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  • Channel Equalization Based on Data Reuse LMS Algorithm for Shallow Water Acoustic Communication

    Page(s): 95 - 98
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (329 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In recent years, there has been increasing interest in the design of underwater acoustic modems for marine environmental monitoring, underwater structure inspection and sea bottom resource exploitation. As underwater acoustic channels pose difficulties such as multipath, time-space selectivity, frequency dependent noise, and Doppler shifts on transmission, research on adaptive equalizers play an important role in the design of underwater modems. This paper presents a data reuse least mean square (DR-LMS) algorithm to achieve equalization performance with low computational complexity to facilitate a practical hardware implementation. Experimental results obtained in physical shallow water channels demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method compared to classic LMS (Least mean square) and RLS (Recursive least square) algorithms. View full abstract»

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