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Date 7-9 April 2006

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Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 69
  • Welcome message from the chair

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): i
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  • Menu page

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 1
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  • [Copyright notice]

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 1
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  • Conference sessions

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 1
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  • Engineering and technology management session

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 1
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  • Poster session

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 1
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  • Poster session continued

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 1
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  • [Hub page]

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  • Raytheon Enterprise Management System Reference Architecture

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 3 - 9
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (107807 KB)  

    Raytheon Information Systems is actively involved in numerous Network Centric development programs. A common element for these programs is an Enterprise Management System (EMS) responsible for all facets of network operations. The Raytheon EMS Reference Architecture (REMSRA) provides technical descriptions, COTS implementation options, and cost estimation information that can be directly inserted into engineering proposals. REMSRA consolidates EMS knowledge into a single consistent set of documentation artifacts that can be maintained, re-used, and tailored as appropriate. REMSRA describes 16 functional capabilities generally required by customers. From these functions, three architectures were developed addressing basic, intermediate, and advanced system needs. With these architectures, EMS designers have a starting point for engineering their systems based on customer requirements; REMSRA has been applied to commercial and classified customer programs and proposals. View full abstract»

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  • Architecture for interoperability and reuse in data mining systems

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 16 - 21
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (212 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Data mining systems are mainly built to assist users to automatically abstract useful information from large data sets. Thus, they often lack supports for other important practical considerations commonly used in software development (e.g., ease of software modification and maintenance, and portability of resulting models). This paper studies principles for the development of data mining systems from software engineering perspectives. In particular, we propose a framework architecture that provides four desirable characteristics: extensibility, modularity, flexibility and interoperabity. The architecture utilizes a design pattern called Pipes and Filters together with data replication to provide loosely coupled structures for the systems. It also facilitates interoperability and reusability of the resulting predictive models obtained from the mining process by means of appropriate interface mechanisms. The proposed architecture promises important advantages that can enhance the usability of data mining systems. View full abstract»

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  • Cryptographic transitions

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 22 - 30
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (529 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A cryptographic transition is defined as managing the passage from one security architecture to another in a methodical approach that is consistent with prudent business practices and security guidelines. This paper addresses the three technology issues that drive the business and security justifications for initiating a transition; the principles guiding policy and practices when conducting a transition; the process to conduct a successful transition; and provides the pros and cons of several actual case studies of cryptographic transitions. View full abstract»

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  • Leveraging Open Source solutions for secure government systems

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 31 - 34
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (666 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Recent updates to federal government and Department of Defense (DoD) security policies have opened the door to the official use of Open Source Software (OSS) as a solution set for the development of secure enterprise systems. New policies published by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the DoD have significantly changed the guidelines associated with deployment of industry-standard OSS security solutions, including: ● Linux - including the NSA sponsored “Security Enhanced Linux” product ● OpenSSL - a full-strength general-purpose cryptography ● Tripwire and Open Source Tripwire® - A change Monitoring and Analysis and auditing product View full abstract»

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  • Reinforcement Learning agents applied to a class of control system problems

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 35 - 40
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (142 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Some control system problems are sufficiently complex that it is difficult to define all of the decision weighting up-front. Reinforcement Learning (RL) can be applied to “tune” system performance. The Centipede Game from Economic Game Theory is used to simulate a control system problem with competing subsystem goals. RL agents are applied to the Centipede Game, which pits agents against each other in a game with increasing payoffs if cooperation is developed between the players. The Centipede Game has been studied both in theory and empirically using human players by other researchers. Human players are more inclined to cooperate and achieve the longer-term payoff than economic game theory would predict. This paper focuses on an experimental study of cooperation between RL players (agents) without explicit communications between the players. This work has application in control systems problems where communications is constrained. View full abstract»

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  • A one gigaFLIPS fuzzy logic control chip using only combinational logic and Field Programmable Gate Arrays

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 41 - 46
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2215 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A real-time fully parallelized fuzzy logic control chip has been designed and implemented in a Xillinx Spartan IIe Field Programmable Gate Array. The current design handles two inputs and one output. Five membership functions are used to fuzzify each input signal, and five membership functions are used to defuzzify the output. Mamdani fuzzy inference is used to evaluate the 25 rules in the rule matrix. Two defuzzification schemes, weighted average and Hemmelman's average have been implemented and evaluated. Fuzzification, rule evaluation, and defuzzification are all performed in a parallel architecture that utilizes only combinational logic. Testing indicates a worst case delay of approximately 25 ns, although typical propagation delays are approximately 18 ns. The worst case delay corresponds to an effective throughput of one billion fuzzy logic inferences per second (one gigaFLIPS). View full abstract»

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  • View-based approach to constructing reliable Home Appliance Control System

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 47 - 56
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2097 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Often times we may find ourselves in a situation where we are miles away and recall that we haven't closed our garage door or haven't switched off the stove, and using our internet-enabled wireless mobile device we send a command to our Home Appliance Control System (HACS) to either close the garage door or switch the stove off. However, how can we be sure that the command was executed and that the desired situation, for example, the closed garage door or the switched-off stove, was reached? This paper proposes a technique for constructing reliable HACS's (or RHACS) using the concept of forward view and reverse view, where a view includes not only the physical path but also the control intelligence for that path. RHACS will not only help people remotely control devices at home but also increase confidence that their commands were effective with no unanticipated side-effects. A brief definition of reliability is the probability of good working of a system - however, our survey of the literature indicated that there is no consensus on this definition. Our analysis of a typical HACS indicated that its reliability depended on three major factors - reliability of software, reliability of hardware, and reliability of the network. As a case-study we considered a HACS configuration that included a washer, dryer, garage door opener, stove and a camera, and explored how the reliability of this system could be improved using the view-based approach. Concentrating on the network reliability aspect we explored three different techniques to improve the overall system reliability: standard protocol (X10) for the forward and reverse views, standard protocol (X10) for the forward view and the wired Ethernet for the reverse view, standard protocol (X10) for the forward view and the wireless Bluetooth for the reverse view. We used the NFR Framework to systematically analyze and evaluate reliability of HACS while at the same time accommodating the varying definitions of reliability,- - and we validated these evaluations using simulations. While further work needs to be done to determine the effectiveness of this approach to other reliability factors, we believe that this study demonstrates the practicality of the view-based approach to methodically analyze and construct reliable HACS with almost negligible overhead. View full abstract»

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  • The Development of a high performance UAV for flight control research

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 57 - 61
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (199 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper summarizes the Phase I Airframe Development of an undergraduate research project for the Raptor 90 remote-controlled helicopter. The purpose of the project is to introduce the fundamentals of dynamics and control for rotorcraft to undergraduate engineers interested in control system theory. Follow on research for the Raptor 90 will include instrumentation and flight-testing for data collection. Controller development will be investigated using a dynamic model simulation of the Raptor 90 helicopter. View full abstract»

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  • A pseudo random I/O scrambling and transformation approach in prevention of software piracy

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 62 - 66
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (143 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper discusses a technique where input-output (I/O) is scrambled by mathematical manipulation. The process is effective in diverting the attention of adversary in terms of actual purpose of the application software. The technique is particularly useful when the software application performs certain number of mathematical equations, and produces a numerical result. The paper also demonstrates how the approach is effective in preventing reverse-engineering of the application. The paper illustrates the implementation of the scheme for a software application, and describes various software issues and practicality of implementation. View full abstract»

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  • On effective use of reliability models and defect data in software development

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 67 - 71
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (159 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In software technology today, several development methodologies such as extreme programming and open source development increasingly use feedback from customer testing. This makes the customer defect data become more readily available. This paper proposes an effective use of reliability models and defect data to help managers make software release decisions by applying a strategy for selecting a suitable reliability model, which best fits the customer defect data as testing progresses. We validate the proposed approach in an empirical study using a dataset of defect reports obtained from testing of three releases of a large medical system. The paper describes detailed results of our experiments and concludes with suggested guidelines on the usage of reliability models and defect data. View full abstract»

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  • Natural language order - a streamlined approach to modeling

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 72 - 76
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (942 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Computer models of biological systems need to manage both form and function. The transformation of scientific observation to computer code requires a means of describing form and function that fits both systems approaches. We propose the use of formal natural language order. Our hypothesis is that by designing such a process we can provide a tool that both “feels” natural to the researcher and is easy for the designer to convert directly to accurate and realistic models of complex biological functions. We modeled skeletal muscle to demonstrate the approach. Supported by UTSA Summer Mentor Program. View full abstract»

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  • Software hazard generation with model checking

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 77 - 82
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (156 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The problem of finding hazards associated with software becomes more necessary if not critical as modern systems increasingly rely on software to provide their main functionalities. While verification and validation can help determine whether software behaves correctly according to its specifications and user needs, they cannot guarantee that software will not lead to system hazards particularly when it interacts with the environments unanticipated by the software designer. Most existing hazard identification techniques require laborious and time-consuming analysis that often either ignores detailed software properties or does not specifically address software-related hazards. This paper presents an approach that facilitates a semi-automated hazard identification of computer-based systems by a novel application of model checking, a technique traditionally used for automated software verification. Our work is in a preliminary stage. The paper describes the approach and illustrates its use to identify hazardous conditions that could lead to violation of system safety. View full abstract»

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  • High performance RF SOI MOSFET varactor modeling and design

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 83 - 86
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1208 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper presents an RF model of an accumulation-mode MOS varactor with a high capacitance tuning range in a multi-finger layout. This model is based on the physical parameters of the device, and it can describe the voltage dependent capacitance, as well as the parasitic circuit elements. It employs a single topology with lumped elements derived from the device, so that it can be easily integrated into common circuit simulators, as well as directly linked to a p-cell. A Verilog-A model of the varactor has been presented and verified with Cadence for circuit simulation. Good agreements between measured data and simulation results were obtain in the frequency range of 0.1 to 10 GHz by de-embedding from the test frame. View full abstract»

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  • Optimization of a 45nm CMOS voltage controlled oscillator using design of experiments

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 87 - 90
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1228 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We present a design of experiments (DOE) approach to nanometer design of an analog voltage controlled oscillator (VCO) using CMOS technology. The functional specifications of the VCO optimized in this design are the center frequency and minimization of overall power consumption as well as minimization of power due to gate tunneling current leakage, a component that was not important in previous generations of CMOS technologies but is dominant at 45nm. Due to the large number of available design parameter (gate oxide thickness and transistor sizes), the concurrent achievement of all optimization goals is difficult. A DOE approach is shown to be very effective and a viable alternative to standard design exploration in the nanometer regime. View full abstract»

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  • Fault-tolerant FPGAs by online ECC verification and restoration

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 91 - 93
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (122 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this paper, an new approach is introduced for FPGAs to perform online verification and restoration. The whole FPGA is considered as a static memory whose content is the configuration data. Hamming codes - an error correcting code, are used to detect and correct the configuration data written to FPGA. The extra Hamming parity data are stored in the Block Memory of the FPGA when configuring the device. A configuration controller that consumes a small portion of the FPGA resources is specifically used to implement the operations of readback, verification, correcting the configuration data and partial re-configuration. The FPGA itself continuously performs the self-checking and restoration after the initial configuration is completed. There is no extra memory or controlling device required outside the FPGA. View full abstract»

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  • Simulation of cooperative control system tasks using hedonistic multi-agents

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 94 - 98
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (133 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    As control system complexity increases, scalability often becomes a limiting constraint. Distributed systems and multi-agent systems are useful approaches in designing complex systems, but communications for coordination are often a limiting factor as systems scale up. Colonies of social insects achieve synergistic results beneficial to the entire colony even though their individual behaviors can be described by simple hedonistic algorithms, and their available communications are very limited. Cooperative actions emerge from simple fixed action patterns in these insects. Complex control systems formed from a multitude of simpler agents or subsystems, with constrained and limited communications channels may also achieve emergent cooperation. Advantages of such systems are reduced communications complexity, and reduced complexity in any single element of the systems, as well as improved robustness. View full abstract»

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  • Simulation of animal behavior using neural networks

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 99 - 102
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (306 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this paper, we simulated some basic animal behavior by letting it “evolve” through generations. The animals, which are able to survive, will be given the privilege to breed the new generation and pass the good genes to the next generation. Our simulation environment consisted of a Prey-Predator-Food model. The prey and predators created in our simulation are objects that have sensors to make them aware of their environment, and they are able to move freely around the world. The food sources are stationary objects placed randomly throughout the world, which serve as targets for prey to search for and eat. View full abstract»

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