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Medical Measurements and Applications Proceedings (MeMeA), 2010 IEEE International Workshop on

Date April 30 2010-May 1 2010

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Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 41
  • [Front cover]

    Page(s): c1
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  • [Copyright notice]

    Page(s): ii
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  • Table of contents

    Page(s): iii - viii
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  • Welcome message

    Page(s): ix - x
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  • Optic visualisation of auricular blood vessels

    Page(s): 1 - 5
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1169 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Optic visualization of auricular blood vessels is considered using transillumination. Since the vessels and nerves course alongside one another, the locations of the nerves are disclosed. The visualization of the nerves is needed for a precise needle application by physician within the scope of electrical stimulation of auricular nerves; the stimulation being applied for pain relieve. Theoretical approaches are considered based on light absorption coefficients over wavelength of different auricular tissue types, which predict optimal optical contrasts for green and blue light. Complementary experimental approaches are introduced which statistical results have proved theoretical reasoning. View full abstract»

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  • Measuring hand-arm steadiness for post-stroke and Parkinson's Disease patients using SIERRA framework

    Page(s): 6 - 9
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (4128 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this paper, we highlight the problem of measuring hand steadiness for the patients with Parkinson's Disease or those who need a rehabilitation program such as brain post-stroke patients. Using the accelerometer, we measure the accelerations against both the body motion and gravity, which is very useful for measuring postural orientations and body movement. In this paper, we present another method for hand steadiness measurement using three-axis accelerometer. A framework named SIERRRA is developed for this purpose to obtain and evaluate the hand reach movements. View full abstract»

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  • PPG-based methods for non invasive and continuous blood pressure measurement: an overview and development issues in body sensor networks

    Page(s): 10 - 13
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (749 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Non invasive and continuous measurement of blood pressure can enable an effective 24/7 monitoring of hypertensive patients to timely prevent cardiovascular problems and precisely regulate anti-hypertension cures. Unfortunately, to date, blood pressure can be only measured through either cuff-based or invasive instruments that cannot be continuously used due to their characteristics. This paper proposes an overview of techniques and approaches based on the photoplethysmographic (PPG) signal for non invasive and continuous measurement of blood pressure. In particular, the PPG signal can be easily acquired from an optical sensor applied on the epidermis and used, alone or integrated with the ECG signal, to estimate the blood pressure. On the basis of such methods new instruments and sensor-based systems can be developed and integrated with computer-based health care systems that aim at supporting continuous and remote monitoring of assisted livings. View full abstract»

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  • The effect of blood pressure variability on the estimation of the systolic and diastolic pressures

    Page(s): 14 - 18
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1223 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressure are two parameters that are widely used in clinical and personal health monitoring and that are subject to significant physiological variability. The estimation of SBP and DBP is therefore subject to two sources of uncertainty: 1) measurement error, and 2) physiological variability. According to the ANSI/AAMI SP10 standard, the measurement error of an automated sphygmomanometer is limited to ±5 mmHg relative to simultaneous reference readings by at least two trained observers employing a calibrated manometer. In order to directly compare the contributions of physiological variability and measurement error to SBP and DBP estimation uncertainty, we analyzed continuous short recordings of arterial pulses (<; 5 min) and calculated the percentage of beats in which the SBP and DBP exceeds ±5 mmHg relative to the mean value in the analyzed interval. In a group of ICU patients, this percentage was 33.0% for SBP and 14.9% for DBP on average, while in a group of healthy individuals this percentage was 27.5% for SBP and 17.8% for DBP on average. True outliers occurred in 5.17% of the SBP and 12.2% of the DBP values in ICU patients, and 3.27% of the SBP and 3.63% of the DBP values in healthy individuals. These results indicate that blood pressure variability is an important contributor to SBP and DBP estimation uncertainty, and devices that intelligently determine the best time to initiate a recording and the frequency of recordings may alleviate this uncertainty. View full abstract»

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  • Optical method for measurement of respiration rate

    Page(s): 19 - 22
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    Standard instrumentation for the assessment of the respiration rate is largely used in medicine. Spirometers, textile-based capacitive sensors or photopletismography are all contact devices used for such aim; the main drawback in their use is the necessity to have a direct contact between the instrument and the patient, which in some cases can limit the use of such devices. In this paper, we present an optical, fully no-contact measurement method for monitoring of the respiration rate, based on the assessment of chest wall movements (velocity and displacement) by a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDVi). The proposed method is operated at a distance of 1.5 m, on different point of the patient thoracic and abdominal area. The measurement procedure was already demonstrated to precisely perform for what concern the monitoring of the cardiac activity. In this paper, we have monitored 33 patients with a reference instrument (spirometer) and with the proposed non-contact method. Statistical analysis (Bland-Altman) of the respiration rate measured with both instruments is reported. We also report a study on the optimal position on the thoracic area based on quality of the signal measured on the same population of subject. Results demonstrate the possibility to continuously monitor the respiration rate with a mean difference respect to the spirometer data of 13 m ( relative error: 0.35%). View full abstract»

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  • Analysis of redundant peaks in LC-MS/MS datasets

    Page(s): 23 - 27
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (662 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    LC-MS/MS is an analytical technique used for protein identification and biomarker discovery. Typically, each peptide will be measured twice by the MS/MS, resulting in two or more mass-to-charge spectra for each peptide. The current study investigates various ways to combine these replicate measurements to improve the quality of the measured spectra, and in turn, the confidence and accuracy of the protein identification. Sample data was collected using a QSTAR XL hybrid quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometer, given a input standard protein mixture of known composition. Spectrum alignment is used to identify replicate spectra. Various algorithms for combining these replicate measurements are investigated, and are compared to the current industry standard MASCOT algorithm. Results are judged based on protein identification rates following combination of replicate spectra. Algorithms which leverage the fact that mass-to-charge data collected above the parent ion mass are more informative for protein identification appear particularly effective, and warrants further investigation. View full abstract»

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  • A computer based prediction for diagnosis of Pulmonary Edema

    Page(s): 28 - 31
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (914 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Pulmonary Edema (PE) is a life threatening disease that needs special attention in the area of research and clinical diagnosis. The computer based technique is rarely reported to quantify the intrathoracic fluid for the diagnosis purpose. In the present paper software has been developed to detect and diagnose pulmonary edema using LabVIEW. The developed software is based on physiological measurements and parameters. The computer based technique is accurate and faster. The reported anthropometric measurements are used to determine transthoracic electrical impedance (TEI) and percent control (PC). The programming of LabVIEW software is done and used to compute the parameters involved to find quantitative PE. An equation relating percent control and thoracic fluid volume (TFV) is obtained using Microsoft Excel. The results of predicted TEI and measured TEI are compared to verify the developed program. It is found that the predicted values of TEI of developed computer based technique are much closer to the measured values of TEI in the present work. View full abstract»

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  • Context-aware smart home monitoring through pressure measurement sequences

    Page(s): 32 - 37
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    This paper presents the architecture, sensing and results of a context-aware smart home monitoring system based on pressure measurement sequences. It focuses on the analysis of transfers performed by the occupant in the bedroom and bathroom to assess if their behavior is within a normal range of motion. Pressure sensors are placed under the bed mattress and embedded in the grab bars of a toilet commode to collect data sequences in the form of different modalities. From these sequences, relevant clinical features are extracted and fused with both past and expected results to output a warning level. The data fusion outputs are then fed into a simulated context-aware classifier before a final decision regarding the occupant is made. The pressure sensing system can be modified depending on a particular occupant's needs, and can also fit well within a larger and more complex smart monitoring framework. View full abstract»

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  • Validation of pressure sensors for physiological monitoring in home environments

    Page(s): 38 - 42
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    Previous research using pressure sensors to monitor physiological signs, such as breathing and heart rate, has often been in controlled laboratory or institutional settings. We are interested in validating the use of such sensors in diverse home environments, where unobtrusiveness is achieved by embedding pressure sensors inside or below furniture.We have quantitatively examined outputs from sensors placed below a variety of mattress types and compared the response to outputs from sensors placed on top of the mattress. We show that embedded pressure sensors are valid for use in home environments and could be reliably used to collect physiological data. However, resultant low signal levels may require more sophisticated signal extraction algorithms. View full abstract»

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  • Mobility change-of-state detection using a smartphone-based approach

    Page(s): 43 - 46
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    Understanding the mobility of people with physical disabilities is important for rehabilitation decision making. This paper presents a smartphone-based approach to mobility monitoring. The BlackBerry-based system is clipped to the person's belt. This approach uses an accelerometer signal to identify changes-of-state caused by starting/stopping and postural change. Our finding suggests that a smartphone integrated with an accelerometer could detect changes from static or dynamic movement (i.e., starting to walk, standing still, slowing down), which compares favorably with previous studies using body-fixed accelerometers. This approach is part of the larger framework of Wearable Mobility Monitoring Systems (WMMS). View full abstract»

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  • Microwave FMCW Doppler radar implementation for in-house pervasive health care system

    Page(s): 47 - 52
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (818 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In recent years, the research in the area of ubiquitous healthcare has intensified. There are many technological advances regarding the development of unobtrusive sensors for cardiac and respiratory activity, but the current scenario is still far away from an everyday life fulfilled with ubiquitous healthcare systems. In this paper, it is described the usage of 24GHz microwave FMCW (frequency modulated continuous wave) Doppler radar (MDR) as one of the main components of a pervasive biomedical system that is part of an assistive environment for the people with less mobility or people with long term health condition. As parts of the present work, in this paper are mentioned the design and implementation of an assistive environment based on a MDR sensor, an experimental study concerning the microwave Doppler radar characteristics and remote sensing of heart rate and breath rate, based on acquisition and processing of the signals delivered by the used radar. View full abstract»

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  • Context-aware physiological data acquisition and processing with wireless sensor networks

    Page(s): 53 - 56
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (392 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Wearable devices are a novel method for sensing physiological parameters of subjects. Even though some of them are equipped with multiple sensors, usually each parameter is analyzed separately. It often leads to false alarm generation and thus limited acceptability of these systems. We propose not only to combine multi-sensor data available on the wearable device, but also to interface the wearable nodes with a mesh network of sensing devices deployed in the environment. Such solution enables context-sensitive analysis of the physiological data leading to correct situation assessment and reliable alarm generation. The wireless sensor network provides reliable and low power communication medium for the wearable devices. We base our system on ECG and acceleration data acquired by the wearable nodes along with descriptive localization and environmental data from the wireless sensor network. We present the architecture of the proposed system and an example implementation both indoors and outdoors. The proposed system is easy to implement, flexible and scalable which makes it suitable for large area deployments. View full abstract»

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  • Ubiquitous social network stack for e-Health applications

    Page(s): 57 - 62
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    Social Networks have contributed the development of e-Health 2.0, which offers promising features of e-Health services any-time and anywhere. In this paper, we address the challenges of adding ubiquity in e-Health 2.0 applications and propose a ubiquity stack that is specialized in capturing temporal and spatial context of a user and can map necessary e-Health services and associated community of interest dynamically. We present our initial proof of concept framework implementation and test results. View full abstract»

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  • Performance evaluation of various storage formats for Clinical Data Repositories

    Page(s): 63 - 68
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    The performance of three different Entity-Attribute-Value (EAV) storage formats for Clinical Data Repositories (CDRs) is compared with regards to querying millions of data points from clinical sources to assess the amount of storage space the data use, the speed with which the data can be obtained, and the complexity of the queries required to retrieve the data. Performance results are presented that show that the hybrid EAV approach provides a nice balance of the simple and multi-data type formats. View full abstract»

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  • Suggested criteria for successful deployment of a Clinical Decision Support System (CDSS)

    Page(s): 69 - 72
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (604 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Three criteria are suggested to help design a Clinical Decision Support System (CDSS) that would have a better chance of being successfully deployed in a clinical environment. These criteria have been successfully applied to a CDSS designed to estimate outcomes for neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) patients. The CDSS was deployed in a pilot study at the Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO)'s NICU. The results of the study showed that the accuracy was deemed acceptable by the physicians and the CDSS would meet their expectations when ready for deployment in a clinical environment. View full abstract»

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  • Capacitive sensing of interfacial forces in prosthesis

    Page(s): 73 - 76
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    In this paper, we present a capacitive sensor that measures the interfacial forces in prosthesis. The sensor's design, transfer function and performance metrics are tested and discussed. The sensor is uniquely able to measure both shear and normal stress simultaneously. View full abstract»

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  • Surface electromyographic signals using a dry electrode

    Page(s): 77 - 80
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    A new flexible, dry electrode is examined for recording surface electromyographic signals and compared to a conventional Ag/AgCl electrode. A suitable dry electrode would enable practical implementation of wearable mobility monitoring systems. Results from a preliminary experiment are presented in this paper. Measurements were performed on the right tibialis anterior during a series of small and large contractions. The effects of skin preparation, which included shaving and cleaning with isopropyl alcohol, are also examined. Results show that the dry electrode is sensitive enough to detect the small, unloaded muscle contractions. The dry electrode signal strength was similar to the Ag/AgCl electrode; however, the noise level was higher by approximately 13.5±1.3 %. Skin preparation reduced the noise level by approximately 7.9% for the dry electrodes and 8.1% for the Ag/AgCl electrodes. View full abstract»

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  • High-voltage pulse stress on biomedical ultrasound probe soldered with Ag-ECA

    Page(s): 81 - 85
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    In this paper the results from a study of high-voltage pulse stressing effects on ultrasound array transducers are presented. The ultrasound transducers have been implemented with a new Pb-free soldering technology, using Silver Electrically Conductive Adhesive. The conductive adhesive have been used among the platelet of piezoelectric and fingers of connection for the implementation of phased array transducer. In order to evaluate the reliability of the biomedical instrument electrical tests are proposed. Some experimental results through a measurement system for the electro-acoustic characterization of the medical probe before and after stress test are obtained and analyzed. View full abstract»

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  • A bus-based smart myoelectric electrode/amplifier

    Page(s): 86 - 91
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    The design of a bus-based smart myoelectric electrode/amplifier is described that is be used in conjunction with a multi-function prosthetic hand controller. This system incorporates several different control strategies including pattern classification of EMG to control a three axis hand (The UNB Hand) that can perform six basic grip patterns. The smart electrode/amplifier was designed to meet power consumption and size specifications of commercially available myoelectric amplifiers used for prosthetic control applications while providing a host of additional features. These features include a CAN bus communication protocol to alleviate wiring complexity, software programmable gain, distributed signal processing and electrode lift detection. In addition, this paper also compares the differences in requirements between a myoelectric electrode/amplifier used in a pattern classifier system to that used in a clinical setting. System testing and evaluation with normally limbed subjects and traumatic amputees are presented. View full abstract»

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  • Design of a gel-less two-electrode ECG monitor

    Page(s): 92 - 96
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    In this paper, an ECG amplifier design, specifically to interface two gel-less electrodes for low-power portable applications, is presented. The goal is to develop a circuit with performance sufficient to extract heart rate information reliably using digital signal processing techniques, when measuring a subject engaging in moderate physical activity (such as walking). This application, having no reference electrode, requires biasing of the input to avoid amplifier saturation, all the while maintaining a sufficiently high common-mode noise rejection. A baseline correction circuit and an isolated circuit ground are included in the proposed design to handle changes in DC voltage drift due to electrode movement as well as to minimize common-mode noise from mains. View full abstract»

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  • A CMOS Linear power supply for a Wireless Biomedical Sensor

    Page(s): 97 - 101
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    This paper describes a CMOS Linear Voltage Regulator (LVR) of an implanted physiological signal system (biosensor) that is used to monitor blood pressure. This system is part of a Wireless Biomedical Sensor (WBS). The LVR topology is based on a classical structure of a Low Dropout Regulator (LDO). The energy is received from a RF link, thus operating as a passive RFID tag. The LVR was designed to achieve important features like low power consumption, and a small silicon area without the need for any external discrete components. The low power operation represents an essential condition to avoid a high energy RF link, thus minimizing the power of the transmitter and the thermal effects on the patient's tissues. It was implemented in a 0.35 μm CMOS process and the prototypes were tested to validate the overall performance. View full abstract»

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