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Collaborative Technologies and Systems (CTS), 2010 International Symposium on

Date 17-21 May 2010

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Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 96
  • Welcome

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 1 - 3
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  • Committee

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 1 - 9
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  • Keynotes

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 1 - 7
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    Provides an abstract for each of the keynote presentations and a brief professional biography of each presenter. The complete presentations were not made available for publication as part of the conference proceedings. View full abstract»

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  • CTS 2010 plenary speech: Adventures in the cyber-commons — A classroom for the playstation generation

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 1
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    A cyber-commons is a technology-enhanced meeting room that supports local and distance collaboration, promoting group-oriented problem solving. The centerpiece of our newest cyber-commons classroom is a large tiled LCD display wall with 20 gigabits of networking. Making this kind of advanced technology available to students for their classes as well as their casual meetings allows us to prototype how advanced visualization infrastructure will impact future classrooms and meeting rooms. This talk will discuss five years of experiences with the cyber-commons and related technology. View full abstract»

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  • Tutorials

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 1 - 10
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    Provides an abstract for each of the tutorial presentations and a brief professional biography of each presenter. The complete presentations were not made available for publication as part of the conference proceedings. View full abstract»

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  • Present

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 1 - 19
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  • The 2010 International Symposium on Collaborative Technologies and Systems (CTS 2010) May 17 - 21, 2010, Chicago, Illinois, USA. CTS 2010 Sponsors

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 1 - 2
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  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 1 - 8
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  • Author index

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 1 - 7
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  • [Copyright notice]

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 1
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  • Understanding considerate systems — UCS (pronounced: You see us)

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 1 - 12
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (264 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Interactions between people occur in a social realm. On the other hand, “things”, including devices for communication and computation, are generally socially deficient. Imagine socially aware systems moving from an interruption model of communication to an introduction model. To create considerate systems, there is a need to model social context, social behavior, and communication goals. This paper describes early systems that work to understand and eliminate the socially disruptive qualities of the ubiquitous systems people increasingly use and rely on in all aspects of their personal, educational, social and business lives. We show performance improving systems: an instant message arrives after you have finished typing a sentence, not while you are forming it; a car waits for you to complete a difficult maneuver before giving you distracting feedback This work relies on dynamic task, user, system, and communication models. The goal is to stimulate more work to understand and create considerate systems. Such systems will improve people's experience and performance. Social responsiveness can become the norm for the technology that pervades our lives. View full abstract»

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  • Capitalization of collective knowledge: From knowledge engineering, multi-agent systems to CSCW and socio semantic web

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 13 - 20
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (180 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Knowledge Management (KM) is one of the key progress factors in organizations. It aims at capturing explicit and tacit knowledge of an organization in order to facilitate the access, sharing, and reuse of that knowledge as well as creation of new knowledge and organizational learning. We introduce in this tutorial knowledge engineering techniques that help at structuring information and knowledge and we present techniques defined in CSCW to handle design rationale and negotiation. An example of collective knowledge is then defined: Project memory. Approaches that help to keep track project knowledge are then detailed. We extend our tutorial by presenting multi-agents techniques and the socio semantic web approach which helps to represent concepts built collectively in an organization. These approaches can be illustrated in real applications in several domains: design, safety, marketplace, etc. View full abstract»

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  • Introduction to XMPP protocol and developing online collaboration applications using open source software and libraries

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 21 - 25
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (104 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Extensible Messaging and Presence Protocol (XMPP) is an open, XML-based protocol aimed at near-real-time, extensible instant messaging (IM) and presence information. It has been expanded into the broader realm of message-oriented middleware. Built to be extensible, the protocol has been extended with features such as Voice over IP and file transfer signaling. XMPP protocol has been used by many social networking platforms including gtalk, and facebook; collaborative services like google wave, and gradient; geo-presence systems like Nokia Ovi Contacts; multiplayer games like chesspark, and by many online live customer support and technical support services. In this manuscript, I will introduce XMPP and its extensions. In the tutorials I will demonstrate how you can leverage some of the available open source software and libraries for rapid development of XMPP enabled services and communication platforms. The tutorial slides and supplementary materials will be available on my website: http://drozturk.com/talks. View full abstract»

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  • Improving video performance in VNC under high latency conditions

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 26 - 35
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (241 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Virtual Network Computing, or VNC, is a popular thin client application used to access files and applications on remote computers. However, VNC can suffer from significant losses in throughput when there is high latency between the client and server. These losses become especially apparent in the case of video, where updates are both large and frequent. In this work, we present a Message Accelerator proxy for VNC. This simple but highly effective solution mitigates high latency network effects for video performance while maintaining the advantages of a client-pull system. By operating near/on the server, it can send updates to the client at a rate corresponding to proxy-server interactions which are faster than client-server interactions. When testing using video, our Message Accelerator design results in frame rates an order of magnitude higher than plain VNC when running under high latency conditions. View full abstract»

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  • BlackTie: Injecting elements of formality into enterprise social software

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 36 - 45
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    Successful organizations rely on a healthy mixture of formal and informal structures to coordinate effectively and operate efficiently. Formal structures, such as documented business processes, are valuable when they can be applied successfully to new contexts and because they provide a high degree of visibility and traceability during their application. When they fail, or are simply not available, an organization relies on its informal structures and the human capacity for innovation to continue operating. Despite their resiliency, informal structures are not as easily understandable which can make them difficult for outsiders to learn, comprehend, and audit. Although formal structures are often the byproducts of recurrent patterns of ad-hoc collaboration, most cooperative tools cannot externalize usage data into human readable artifacts that can be systematically reused and evolved. In this paper we introduce BlackTie, a collaborative system designed to extract tangible and reusable models of collaboration during ad-hoc interaction and facilitate their reuse and evolution over time. View full abstract»

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  • A Social Collaborative virtual environment for software development

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 46 - 55
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (714 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Software development teams often require information and expert help that are not supported by conventional development environments. This paper presents a social development environment called SCI (Social Collaborative IDE) that unifies the concepts of social network and collaborative development environment. SCI integrates presence and activity awareness information and collaborative program development tools. The activity awareness information provides inter-project and inter-session sharing and awareness of other developers' behavior. The collaboration tools provide a wide range of facilities for synchronous and asynchronous collaboration and information sharing between team members. SCI presents a framework that manages pending invitations of team members. View full abstract»

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  • Supporting collaboration by providing real-time assessment of individual and team performance

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 56
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    Summary form only given. The management of team work and task work in modern high-paced, collaborative environments is challenging due to unyielding time constraints, constant switching of cognitive tasks, and collating incoming and outgoing information requests to and from collaborators who vary in their expertise. To ensure the effectiveness of collaboration in these environments, agencies frequently train users based on assessments of their previous collaborative performance, either from exercises or actual work practice. Armed with appropriate technology, however, information about the state of the collaboration can be provided to the collaborators in real time and provide benefit to collaboration before errors occur. This paper presents a system that performs automated analysis on communication data in real time to support task work and team work activities. The system is based on the confluence of innovative extensions to the state of the art in performance assessment theory, Natural Language Processing techniques, and Cognitive Systems Engineering-influenced user interface design. View full abstract»

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  • Relational access control with bivalent permissions in a social Web/collaboration architecture

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 57 - 66
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    We describe an access control model that has been implemented in the web content management framework “Deme” (which rhymes with “team”). Access control in Deme is an example of what we call “bivalent relation object access control” (BROAC). This model builds on recent work by Giunchiglia et al. on relation-based access control (RelBAC), as well as other work on relational, flexible, fine-grained, and XML access control models. We describe Deme's architecture and review access control models, motivating our approach. BROAC allows for both positive and negative permissions, which may conflict with each other. We argue for the usefulness of defining access control rules as objects in the target database, and for the necessity of resolving permission conflicts in a social Web/collaboration architecture. After describing how Deme access control works, including the precedence relations between different permission types in Deme, we provide several examples of realistic scenarios in which permission conflicts arise, and show how Deme resolves them. Initial performance tests indicate that permission checking scales linearly in time on a practical Deme website. View full abstract»

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  • User centric authentication for web applications

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 67 - 74
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    Due to its large penetration and ease of use, the web environment provides a platform that enables collaboration among people working on a joint topic. Regardless of the actual focus of collaborating groups, security is very often a key aspect of such an environment. Provision of the proper level of authentication and access control is a necessity in almost any real world deployment of collaborative tools. The growing number of collaborating people also increases the overheads of the management of the users and their identities, especially when people from multiple institutions are involved. Current approaches to address these issues try to make use of the federated identity management, which makes it possible to utilize the existing identity management systems and to link them with the service providers. However promising the federated models are, they also show some drawbacks that render the systems less usable than intended. In this paper we provide a summary of the weaknesses and, following that, we introduce another model that places the user as the main part of the infrastructure. The architecture moves the management of users' attributes closely to their owner and provides a scalable infrastructure enabling a dynamic trust establishment. View full abstract»

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  • Enhancing user authentication in claim-based identity management

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 75 - 83
    Cited by:  Patents (1)
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    In claim-based identity management (CBIM) systems, users identify themselves using security tokens that contain personally identifiable information, and that are signed by an identity provider. However, a malicious identity provider could readily impersonate any user by generating appropriate tokens. The growing number of identity theft techniques raises the risk of service providers being deceived by untrustworthy identity providers. We show how this vulnerability can be mitigated by adding an authentication layer, between the user and the service provider, to a CBIM system. We propose two possible implementations of this layer. The first approach requires a user to perform an additional step before the service provider completes the authentication process. That is, the user must present to the service provider certain information sent to the user by the service provider during the most recent successful use of the scheme. A proof-of-concept implementation of this scheme has been produced. The second approach involves a challenge-response exchange between the user and the service provider. This requires a minor modification to the service provider XML-based security policy declaration message. View full abstract»

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  • Role-based domain discovery in decentralized secure interoperations

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 84 - 93
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (359 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Multi-domain collaborative environments are becoming a reality as can be witnessed in emerging Internet-based enterprise applications. Access control to ensure secure interoperation in such multi-domain environments is a crucial challenge. Decentralized secure interoperation approaches are becoming promising since it requires no centralized administration and thus can accommodate very large scale collaborations. In decentralized secure interoperation approaches, the resource-requesting domain itself needs to first identify the specific domains that contains the requested resources since there is no centralized administrative domain. Such a problem becomes more challenging when Role Based Access Control (RBAC) is employed since the permissions over resources are encapsulated as roles and the least privilege principle has to be ensured. In this paper, we define such a problem as role-based domain discovery problem and propose efficient solutions to address it. In particular, we use a role mapping algorithm to ensure the least privilege principle and propose three discovery approaches to identify the domains containing the requested resources: Linear Propagation Approach (LPA), Broadcasting Approach (BA), and Hybrid Approach (HA). We conduct a comprehensive simulation to evaluate and compare the three proposed discovery approaches using various criteria. View full abstract»

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  • Engineering intelligent sensor networks with ASSL and DMF

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 94 - 102
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    We describe the use of ASSL (Autonomic System Specification Language) and DMF (Demand Migration Framework) in the development of software systems for intelligent sensor networks. ASSL is used to formally specify and automatically generate autonomous intelligent sensor nodes. DMF is applied to connect those nodes in a sensor network. ASSL provides sensor networks with self-management behavior based on special policies allowing sensor nodes to reason and collaborate by exchanging information via a DMF instance. View full abstract»

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  • Dynamic state-based routing for load balancing and efficient data gathering in wireless sensor networks

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 103 - 112
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    We consider the online data gathering problem in wireless sensor networks and examine the key issues of load balancing the nodes to achieve longer network lifetime, and that of load balancing the network links to achieve greater reliability in the network. We model the given network as a shortest-path DAG D, which defines a set of parent nodes for each node that determine the minimum-hops paths from the node to a sink. Data gathering in D is accomplished using a dynamic routing approach, where each node selects a parent using a parent selection function σ to forward the sensed data. We investigate a dynamic state-based routing approach where σ is defined using the current state of the network and propose two routing algorithms-MPE Routing and WPE Routing, that aim to load balance the nodes as well as the edges of D. Load balancing the nodes achieves longer network lifetime while load balancing the edges yields greater disjointness and thus greater reliability and trust in the network. Our simulation results show that our algorithms perform consistently better than our benchmark algorithms and other existing data gathering schemes with respect to our three goodness measures-network lifetime, nodal load balancing and disjointness. View full abstract»

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  • Dynamic Networks of Timed Automata for collaborative systems: A network monitoring case study

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 113 - 122
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (195 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We introduce Dynamic Networks of Timed Automata, an extension of (Networks of) Timed Automata useful for specifying concurrently executing timed-processes. The main difference with Timed Automata is that we allow the instantiation at run-time of multiple copies of automata. In this paper we also show an industrial case study where a system for monitoring a network of wireless devices is built applying Dynamic Networks of Timed Automata. The network is characterized by a high degree of dynamism, since its infrastructure is fixed but a big amount of its hosts continuously connect and disconnect. We see how extending XAL, an executable language for Timed Automata, we can first model our system, made of cooperating timed processes, and finally transform such model into an executable application. We also show how to model-check relevant properties of our application, expressing them through a temporal logic called TCTL and using existing formal methods and tools. View full abstract»

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  • Targeted ontology mapping

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 123 - 132
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    We examine the ontology mapping problem with three different groups of readers in mind: system designers, who need to know what is and isn't possible given the current state of alignment algorithms and what pitfalls to watch out for when someone suggests the use of ontologies in a project; system developers, who require knowledge of specific algorithms and useful software libraries; and semantic interoperability researchers who may be interested in the potential efficacy of using a genetic algorithm to choose which similarity metrics should be employed to map two ontologies, based on a small, carefully-chosen subset of each ontology. View full abstract»

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