By Topic

Date 20-22 Sept. 1982

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 247
  • [Front cover and table of contents]

    Page(s): 0
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (1188 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • NOAA's Diving Program

    Page(s): 1 - 2
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (115 KB)  

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) fields the largest civilian diving complement of any Federal agency. When NOAA was formed in 1970, various scientific agencies were consolidated. Their diving programs and personnel were also brought together and have evolved over these last 12 years into a safe and efficient underwater team. The NOAA Diving Program is responsive primarily to the research endeavors of the NOAA scientist yet also may benefit the general diving community. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • The ADC Today

    Page(s): 3 - 4
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (140 KB)  

    First Page of the Article
    View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • United States Navy Diving Safety Program

    Page(s): 5 - 8
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (313 KB)  

    The United States Navy has an aggressive and comprehensive diving safety program. The program begins with the initial selection of candidates for formal diving training and follows the diver throughout training and into the Fleet in various forms. One of these forms is technical guidance with the primary vehicle being the United States Navy Diving Manual. This manual sets forth the procedures and equipment to be used for diving evolutions. A second form is the various inspections our diving systems, equipment and divers undergo. Included are INSURV, operational readiness, safety, administrative and systems/equipment certification inspections. A third form serves as an aid to assist the Navy to evaluate procedures and equipment. In this form computerized statistics are kept on all dives performed by Navy divers. This cradle-to-grave philosophy totally encompasses Navy diving and statistics show that it is successful. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • An Analysis Of U.S. Occupational Diving Fatalities 1970-1981

    Page(s): 9 - 13
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (470 KB)  

    Twelve categories of occupational diving are described including seven of a commercial nature. Distinct differences in both practices and equipment used are noted. Typical scenarios are depicted for several categories to point out operational differences. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • The Western Regional Undersea Laboratory: A New Research Facility For Temperate Water Marine Scientists

    Page(s): 21 - 24
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (448 KB)  

    In late 1984 the University of Southern California plans to conduct its first science mission from a new saturation diving-habitat complex at Santa Catalina Island, California. The Western Regional Undersea Laboratory Program will consist of a 9-foot diameter, 40-foot long habitat attacbed to a baseplate in 70 feet of water, and will allow aquanauts access to a variety of substrates and habitats including large kelp beds, rocky reefs, and a highly productive soft-bottom area. Typical missions will include studies on algae physiology, animal behavior, physical/ biological interactions, resource development, pollution, human physiology, gear development and archaeological survey methods. Emphasis will be placed on long- and short-term experimental work, and will be oriented toward making maximum use of the available study sites and the need for saturation capability. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Advancing technology and reasonable regulations: Coast guard rules on commercial diving operations

    Page(s): 25 - 26
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (151 KB)  

    The Coast Guard rules governing certain commercial diving operations were published in 1978. Advances brought about by marketplace competition as well as research and development require flexibility and common sense when writing and implementing safety regulations. Deeper working dives, extended bottom times, increased use of manned submersibles, the advent of one-atmosphere suits and other changes all place burdens on an agency's ability to perform their legislated tasks in a professional manner. As a partner in the progress of ocean development, some of our general policies and how we have reacted to this in our diving rules will be discussed, noting specific examples. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Deepwater Liveboating

    Page(s): 27 - 29
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (282 KB)  

    The practice of commercial diving from a moving vessel is considered. Live-boating as a technique is defined and developed. This paper addresses OSHA regulations instituted in 1977. The USCG has since assumed authority for their enforcement. Five years of commercial diving operations has allowed divers, industry and government to examine the viability of these regulations. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Minimum QA documentation for civilian procurement of dive systems

    Page(s): 30 - 35
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (900 KB)  

    Procurement of dive systems by government agencies is, like all their buying, fairly rigidly guided by procurement regulations. Civilian firms, however, have no such uniform set of guides to assist them in like procurements. The present paper is an attempt to ease the situation by referencing the most-needed information for the benefit of civilian firms who may be procuring dive systems. The paper begins with discussing the benefits to be gained and pitfalls that can be avoided by documenting certain information. The needed types of such information are then outlined so that the user can select the type and level of information that best fits his specific needs. Example formats are then presented which the user can adapt for his use or use as guides in developing his own formats. Emphasis is placed on the fact that much of the "procurement" documentation is equally valuable to the user in achieving safe, efficient, operation and maintenance of the system after it is delivered. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • 2000m Deep Submergence Research Vehicle "SHINKAI 2000"

    Page(s): 41 - 49
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1406 KB)  

    "SHINKAI 2000" with a weight of 23 tons and a length of 9.3 m, is a manned deep submergence research vehicle (the Vehicle) having a maximum operating depth of 2000 meters. The Vehicle is designed so functional and compact as to maintain high maneuverability and to make oceanographic research activities successful. After sea-trials "SHINKAI 2000" was delivered to Japan Marine Science and Technology Center. This paper presents main features and test results. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Silver-Zinc Battery Power System for 2,000m Deep Submergence Research Vehicle "SHINKAI 2000"

    Page(s): 50 - 56
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (559 KB)  

    The oil-filled pressure-compensated Silver-Zinc Battery System was developed and applied for practical use as a power source of the 2,000m Deep Submergence Research Vehicle"SHINKAI 2000"(DSV-2K). The battery system is made up of 2 main units, each consisting of 72 cells. After successful tests on cells and one main unit, the battery system practically used in the DSV-2K served satisfactorily for almost one year under the no-maintenance conditions and showed the good performance as was expected. The structure, designe considerations and test results are summarized hereunder. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Recovery of a one-atmosphere transfer system

    Page(s): 57 - 60
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (452 KB)  

    On May 14, 1980, a one-atmosphere submersible transfer system was deployed in 604 m off West End, Grand Bahama Island. The system, designed and built at Harbor Branch Foundation, Inc., weighs 2994 kg in air and 1361 kg in sea water and was designed to enable scientists to transfer experiments at atmospheric pressure from the dive chamber of a JOHNSON-SEA-LINK submersible to ambient pressure at depths to 610 m. This paper deals with the recovery of this system on October 27, 1981, using two of Harbor Branch's JOHNSON-SEA-LINK (J-S-L) submersibles and two research vessels, 37.5 m R/V JOHNSON and 30.5 m R/V SEA DIVER. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Towed unmanned submersible (TUMS) System

    Page(s): 61 - 64
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1008 KB)  

    A unique unmanned deep-sea submersible, capable of operation in depths beyond the reach of conventional diving systems or ship sensors, is being built by Sperry for the Royal Navy. The Sperry Towed Unmanned Submersible (TUMS) will perform a wide range of search, identification, classification, and recovery operations at full ocean depths using optic, acoustic, and magnetic sensors and a manipulator arm. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Fiber-optic-tethered unmanned submersible for searching submarine cables

    Page(s): 65 - 72
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (620 KB)  

    A newly developed, fiber-optictethered, unmanned submersible called MARCAS (Marine Cable Search System) has been operating successfully. The mission of MARCAS is to inspect submarine communication cables and the seabed up to 200m in depth. MARCAS has dc and ac magnetometers (proton magnetometers and fluxgate magnetometers) and a metal detector in order to find and trace the cable even if buried under the seabed. A wavelength division multiplex optical fiber transmission system has been developed for the data transmission between the submersible and the mother vessel. MARCAS can be equipped optionally with soil property testing instruments. These characters will be discussed. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Experiences with the use of an ROV for cleaning and inspecting high stress areas of complex offshore structures

    Page(s): 73 - 77
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (445 KB)  

    The main purpose of the project was to clean and inspect high stress areas of offshore concrete structures using IKU's ROV "Snurre" which was especially equipped. In addition an attempt to clean a steel jacket tubular joint was carried out. High pressure waterjetting was used. Two cleaning methods, using a special designed frame for cleaning of large areas and a manipulator for spot cleaning, were tried. The cleaned areas were inspected in detail with "Snurre's" two b/w video cameras. Colour photos were taken of interesting spots. The main tasks of the project, cleaning and inspecting concrete surfaces, were carried out successfully. The tubular joint cleaning attempt had too low priority to be successful. However, valuable experiences as to the problems involved were made. Cleaning and inspecting offshore constructions with properly outfitted ROV's will have considerable advantages with regard to cost efficiency and security. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • EOD Vehicle Conceptual Design Study

    Page(s): 78 - 85
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (518 KB)  

    A conceptual design study of a tethered undersea remotely operated vehicle (ROV) has been made for the U.S. Naval Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) Technology Center. The conceptual design vehicle is designated ROV-EOD. The purpose of the vehicle is to locate, identify and neutralize suspected ordnance on the ocean floor, normally at or near harbors; thus relieving divers of a very difficult and dangerous task. The ROV-EOD must carry both TV camera and scanning sonar for viewing the ordnance, and a droppable payload for neutralizing the ordnance. The vehicle must be able to make headway in strong currents, and must be small and light enough to be launched from a 24 foot boat by two EOD crewmen. The conceptual design results in a streamlined vehicle, powered by four thrusters and weighing less than 88 kilograms View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • The use of tethered vehicles in oil field applications

    Page(s): 86 - 91
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (846 KB)  

    The use of remotely controlled tethered vehicle systems for oil production related tasks has increased dramatically over the past decade. This increase can be traced to two primary forcing functions. First, the advance in robotic technology has made it possible for unmanned remotely controlled systems to perform a variety of tasks which once only a diver could do. Secondly, with the continued advance of oil recovery from deeper and deeper ocean depths, the cost of saturation diving operations has made it economical to develop sophisticated unmanned vehicle systems which will yield a return over many years of operation. This paper will look at some of the current and future vehicle technology applied for offshore oil production. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Instrumentation for ocean acoustic tomography

    Page(s): 92 - 99
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (606 KB)  

    A test ocean acoustic tomography experiment was conducted in the southern North Atlantic during 1981. Travel time variations of pulse-like signals transmitted between moored acoustic sources and receivers separated by hundreds of kilometers were used to image the intervening sound speed field. Intelligent sources, receivers, mooring positioning monitoring systems and precision time-keeping devices were developed specifically for this application. In this paper we describe the design of these instruments and we present examples of their use in the tomography experiment to show satisfactory overall system performance. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Acoustic navigation--New microprocessor generation

    Page(s): 100 - 105
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (432 KB)  

    In the past decade need for acoustic navigation systems has increased significantly. A need for flexible field programmable systems exist in oil well head exploration, side scan sonar navigation, array locating system for geomapping, dredging and deep sea mining. This paper describes a new generation of microprocessor-based acoustic signal processing equipment developed to satisfy the above applications. Low jitter techniques in the system are described. Advantages of multipath signal processing in difficult terrains is explained. The concept of modular programming used to enhance software flexibility and reliability is outlined. A simple, low cost navigation system, based on HP 85 is presented. Typical navigation plots are illustrated. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Acoustic Control System

    Page(s): 106 - 110
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (952 KB)  

    This paper describes some features of an acoustic control system. It is designed primarily for acoustic control of blow out preventers and subsea production units. The system is combined with a super short baseline acoustic navigation system. The communication between the central unit and the subsea unit to be controlled is 2-way. The communication from the subsea unit is used for readback of both status and acknowledgement of received command. This is utilized in a message handshake to obtain an improved security. The messages are coded by using multifrequency keying (MFSK). Each frequency is transmitted with high power, giving a favourably signal to noise ratio. Therefore the system works well in noise environments. Each frequency is transmitted only once in a message. That gives the system good immunity against reflections. All received frequencies are stored in memory for some time by the algorithm which decodes the frequencies to messages. By using this information the algorithm detects, if however possible, a message received together with noise pulses and pulses from either reflections or other acoustic activity in the area. The information also enables the algorithm to detect an ambiguity in the received message and thereby rejecting the message. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Acoustic telemetry for underwater control

    Page(s): 111 - 114
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (369 KB)  

    The need for a wireless, high-security, high-capacity, highly reliable control system for undersea operations increases as the offshore oil industry begins production in deeper waters. Acoustic telemetry provides a practical method of remote subsea control. Through the use of frequency and time diversity, an FSK modulation scheme can provide an acoustic telemetry system capable of operation over long horizontal ranges (3 nautical miles or more) in a severe multipath and noise environment. This paper describes the design and test of an acoustic telemetry system capable of transmitting and receiving 128 unique commands at a signaling rate of 40 bits per second. Test results have demonstrated a greater-than-94 percent probability of message detection with zero false operations or message errors in 40 hours of operation. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Side scan sonars--Comparison with photographic pictures

    Page(s): 115 - 120
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2241 KB)  

    The Centre National pour l'Exploitation des Océans (CNEXO - French National Center for Ocean Exploitation) has performed a set of trials with side scan sonars on an artificial lake. This lake was entirely emptied in 1971 and aerial photographs have been taken. So we have reference documents (stereoscopic photo of the bottom and very accurate topographical map) and we can evaluate the sonars by comparison with these documents. Different side scan sonars (50 and 100 Khz) have been tested. In this paper, we give first conclusions from these trials showing comparisons photo-topography-sonar pictures, and submit some reflections about this sensor which is very attractive but must be developed (improvements in stability of fish, signal and data processing, antennas ...). View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Array shape estimation

    Page(s): 121 - 122
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (152 KB)  

    A description of a method for the determination of array shape is given in three dimensions using measurements of array heading and depth taken at known points along the array, including the mathematical basis for the method. The applicability of this procedure to the determination of array shape is based on the idealization of the array, containing heading and depth sensors, as some unknown smooth curve on which both the heading of the tangent to the curve and the depth of the curve (below some convenient datum plane such as the water surface) are each measured at preselected points fixed on the curve, each point corresponding to the location of either a heading or a depth sensor in the array. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.