2009 38th Annual Symposium of the Ultrasonic Industry Association (UIA)

23-25 March 2009

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 15 of 15
  • [Front cover]

    Publication Year: 2009, Page(s): c1
    Request permission for commercial reuse | PDF file iconPDF (895 KB)
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • [Title page]

    Publication Year: 2009, Page(s): 1
    Request permission for commercial reuse | PDF file iconPDF (38 KB)
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • [Copyright notice]

    Publication Year: 2009, Page(s): 1
    Request permission for commercial reuse | PDF file iconPDF (39 KB)
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Preface

    Publication Year: 2009, Page(s): 1
    Request permission for commercial reuse | PDF file iconPDF (61 KB) | HTML iconHTML
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Author list

    Publication Year: 2009, Page(s): 1
    Request permission for commercial reuse | PDF file iconPDF (44 KB)
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Minimally invasive robotic HIFU neurosurgical applications

    Publication Year: 2009, Page(s):1 - 5
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (289 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Due to complex anatomy and functionality of brain, volumetric excision of abnormal tissue targets such as tumors/cancers poses a great risk as it is difficult without causing harm to the overlying normal structures. Minimally invasive and non-invasive robotic approaches are being widely investigated as alternatives to traditional open surgery due to their advantages in accurate planning, registrat... View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Ultrasonic surgical horn for approaches to brain tumors and spine applications

    Publication Year: 2009, Page(s):1 - 5
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1059 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Ultrasonic surgical aspirators are used for removal of tumors in the brain and approaches in spine, where a transducer and horn with a central hole fragment and suction tissue. Bone fragmenting and aspirating surgical tips (horns) are discussed for accessing deeper regions in the brain and for emerging spine applications. Attaining resonant frequency, predicting displacements, and monitoring stres... View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Optimizing piezoelectric crystal preload in ultrasonic transducers

    Publication Year: 2009, Page(s):1 - 6
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1427 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Designers of industrial ultrasonic transducers commonly use the integral piezoelectric crystals as a force sensor for setting preload. This usually involves a press fixture and charge amplifier for the measurement of voltage versus force. Although this is a very convenient method, it may be inaccurate since the governing piezoelectric properties can vary ±20% from lot-to-lot. Other preload scheme... View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A novel numerical solution to the diffraction term in the KZK nonlinear wave equation

    Publication Year: 2009, Page(s):1 - 9
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1311 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Nonlinear ultrasound modeling is finding an increasing number of applications in both medical and industrial areas where due to high pressure amplitudes the effects of nonlinear propagation are no longer negligible. Taking nonlinear effects into account makes the ultrasound beam analysis more accurate in these applications. One of the most widely used nonlinear models for propagation of 3D diffrac... View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A novel sensor for determining ultrasonic intensity

    Publication Year: 2009, Page(s):1 - 4
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (429 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Quantifying the acoustic output of diagnostic and therapeutic medical ultrasound devices is an established practice, using measurement methods based on applying miniature hydrophones to determine acoustic pressure distributions. However, specification standards require manufacturers to describe and declare acoustic output information in the form of intensity values, as these are more relevant to t... View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Porous PZT with tailored ultrasonic properties

    Publication Year: 2009, Page(s):1 - 5
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (344 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    For many years, PZT has been the most important piezoelectric ceramic for commercial applications. The well-known soft and hard PZT types are obtained by doping with various elements, but especially mechanical and acoustic properties cannot be altered significantly by slight modifications of the composition. However, the invention of PZT with controlled porosity has greatly extended the range of p... View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • The importance of temperature control in the operation of high power ultrasound reactors

    Publication Year: 2009, Page(s):1 - 5
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1088 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    This paper describes the effects of temperature changes on the operation of a 25 kHz sonochemical reactor, which is being developed as a reference facility for studying acoustic cavitation at NPL. Field measurements, acquired using a hydrophone in different locations inside the cavitation reactor, are compared with Finite Element Models at different temperatures, showing that significant changes i... View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Bioeffects of low dose ultrasound on neuronal cell function

    Publication Year: 2009, Page(s):1 - 3
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (199 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    A growing body of work demonstrates the therapeutic value of sub-ablation ultrasound on various tissues. If ultrasound can safely manipulate neuronal tissue, then it might be possible to use it to treat neurodegenerative diseases. Anticipating such future applications, we investigated reversible bioeffects of very low dose focused ultrasound on neuronal cell function in vitro. A rat hippocampal sl... View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Ultrasound image-based estimation system for arteriosclerosis of in vivo blood vessels

    Publication Year: 2009, Page(s):1 - 4
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (966 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    With aging, the mechanical properties of a blood vessel degrade; its strength and elongation decreases. However, its stiffness (stress/strain) increases. Also the rate of hardening of the vessel depends on the individual. It is an urgent task to establish an inspection technique for strength parameters as hardening progresses. This report presents such a technique for estimating sclerosis of in vi... View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Mechanisms of ultrasonic thrombolysis

    Publication Year: 2009, Page(s):1 - 4
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (238 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    An ultrasonic transversely vibrating wire delivers energy to an active zone to facilitate thrombolysis in a blood vessel. Ultimately, all the energy delivered into the treatment region at the active zone ends up as heat. The heat created can originate from three sources. The first source of heat is from stresses in the waveguide and resultant internal frictional losses of the material; this heat i... View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.