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Haptic Audio visual Environments and Games, 2009. HAVE 2009. IEEE International Workshop on

Date 7-8 Nov. 2009

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  • [Front cover]

    Page(s): c1
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  • [Copyright notice]

    Page(s): ii
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  • Table of contents

    Page(s): iii - vii
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  • Have 2009 Committee

    Page(s): viii - ix
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  • Design issues for haptic steering force feedback on an automotive simulator

    Page(s): 1 - 6
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1154 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper describes the deployment of a torque controlled force feedback steering device for human in the loop automotive simulations. The high bandwidth of the velocity controlled three phase brushless servomotor allows for a realistic representation of the virtual dynamics. The electromagnetic interference produced by the industrial servomotor and the controller made the elaboration stage challenging. To overcome the former issues careful amplification and filtering was ineluctable. The final dynamical model of the steering system used and the corresponding motor controller constitute an efficient haptic device for providing intuitive kinesthetic feedback. The system can feed back torques up to 20 NM with accuracy of 0.02 NM. View full abstract»

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  • The concept of inverse perlin noise for tactile rendering

    Page(s): 7 - 12
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2040 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper proposes the concept of inverse perlin noise which is a reverse process of perlin noise. The proposed method enables users to feel the haptic sensation when he/she rubs on the surface of an object. We extract individual random signals from a target object modeled by perlin noise and apply them to haptic actuators. In order to evaluate the proposed method, we compute errors between the original perlin noise and the reconstructed noise function obtained from the inverse perlin noise. Through the experiment, we verify that the proposed method has enough possibility to be applied in tactile rendering. View full abstract»

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  • A pragmatic approach to the design and implementation of a vibrotactile belt and its applications

    Page(s): 13 - 18
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (599 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A human centered pragmatic approach to the design and implementation of a vibrotactile belt is presented in this paper. Based on (a) extensive usability feedback we've collected over the past year, and (b) a thorough survey of existing design guidelines from the literature, we propose a set of design guidelines for the development of haptic belts that can span seamlessly across various applications. These guidelines cover three important aspects for haptic belts: functionality, performance and usability, which are vital for longitudinal use by end users. Taking a human-centric approach from these design guidelines, we demonstrate the construction of a wirelessly controlled haptic belt design that is versatile, usable and practical. Implementation details of the belt are given, along with a preliminary usability study and a brief review of some of the important application areas of haptic belts. Results from the usability study reveal that participants were very pleased with the proposed haptic belt, and found it to be easy to wear and use. View full abstract»

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  • Spatial resolution of vibrotactile perception on the human forearm when exploiting funneling illusion

    Page(s): 19 - 23
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (961 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Recent advances in man-machine interaction, telerobotics, telepresence and teleaction have shown that introducing the haptic modality to multimedia applications has the power to significantly widen their application range and to dramatically improve the user experience. Especially, the human body surface has been considered as an additional means of presenting information using vibrotactile display devices. In this context, spatial displacement of a vibrotactile stimulus can be deployed for information display. By exploiting a psychophysical illusion called ¿funneling illusion¿, we are able to increase the spatial resolution of vibrotactile displays. In this paper, we aim at investigating the spatial resolution of vibrotactile perception on the human forearm when applying multiple ¿funneling¿ stimuli. In our psychophysical experiments, we revealed the human spatial perception ability on the human forearm for stationary and moving vibrotactile stimuli. View full abstract»

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  • GPU methods for real-time haptic interaction with 3D fluids

    Page(s): 24 - 29
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1044 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Real-time haptic rendering of three-dimensional fluid flow will improve the interactivity and realism of applications ranging from video games to surgical simulators, but it remains a challenging undertaking due to its high computational cost. Humans are very familiar with the look and feel of real fluids, so successful interactive simulations need to obey the mathematical relationships of fluid dynamics with high spatial resolution and fast temporal response. In this work we propose an innovative GPU-based approach that enables real-time haptic rendering of high-resolution 3D Navier-Stokes fluids. We show that moving the vast majority of the computation to the GPU allows for the simulation of touchable fluids at resolutions and frame rates that are significantly higher than any other recent real-time methods without a need for pre-computations. Based on our proposed approach, we build a haptic and graphic rendering system that allows users to interact with 3D virtual smoke in real time through the Novint Falcon, a commercial haptic interface. View full abstract»

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  • Multifinger haptic interface for bimanual manipulation of virtual objects

    Page(s): 30 - 35
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1086 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A multi-finger haptic interface called MasterFinger for bimanual manipulation of virtual objects is described in this paper. The index fingers and the thumbs are inserted in their corresponding thimbles in order to perform virtual manipulations. A gimble with 3-rotational degree of freedom connects the thimble to a serial-parallel mechanical structure that is made up of 3 electro-mechanical actuators. This mechanism thereby provides 6 DoF of movement with force reflection in all directions. A distributed architecture has been implemented to simulate bimanual manipulations. This architecture is based on the use of a specific controller for each finger and a server computer that simulates the virtual manipulation in real time. Some experiments that evaluate the performance of the MasterFinger are described. View full abstract»

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  • Haptic system to alert users before impending human errors

    Page(s): 36 - 41
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (899 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    High performance cognitive environments such as surgery or driving pose extensive constraints on efficient perception of salient information. In such environments it is beneficial to track physiological signals from the operator and predict errors and their type before they occur and alert the operator to take preventive action. The challenge lies in interpreting complex neural data obtained through sensors such as EEG signals and subsequently alerting the subject to possible errors. This paper presents a EEG based analysis system coupled with a haptic glove and visual feedback based alert system to provide such functionality. The haptic glove was made from six vibratory motors placed on fingers and palm. The EEG system consisted of a Bluetooth EEG cap that monitored attention distraction and drowsiness. Results show that the hand based system for delivering visio-haptic signals to alert users to impending errors can help in avoiding human errors. View full abstract»

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  • Haptic linear paths for arm rehabilitation in MS patients

    Page(s): 42 - 47
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (779 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Force feedback in the context of a rehabilitation program may have its benefits. The generated forces can be used to assist, support or oppose the patients according to their personal needs and abilities. Using the Phantom haptic device, we conducted a pilot study focussing on the rehabilitation of the upper limbs in MS patients. Apart from the promising clinical results, we found that only a few haptic effects are commonly necessary. Among them is a `linear path', a haptic effect that generates the necessary forces to follow a path defined by two or more points in space. In this paper we motivate why the current implementations in existing haptic APIs (such as H3D) are not completely suitable. We propose two possible alternative implementations based on our requirements: one using rounded polygons, another using cardinal splines. It will turn out that both solutions are equivalent, but depending on the application one of both will be more suitable. View full abstract»

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  • A non-linear viscoelastic tensor-mass model for surgery simulation

    Page(s): 48 - 53
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (808 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The linear elastic models of soft tissue are widely used in surgery simulation due to their computation efficiency, however, it is well known that these models are only a coarse approximation of the real properties of biological soft tissue. To achieve realistic simulation, the deformable model should incorporate many other tissue properties such as non-linearity, anisotropy and viscoelasticity. Among these properties, viscoelasticity is a very important one and it determines directly the behaviors of the tissue when it is cut, deformed or torn. In this study, we moved Picinbono's work one step further and proposed to incorporate the property of viscoelasticity into the tissue model. In addition, our model can allow relatively fast computation of the bio-mechanical forces and deformations of soft tissue in simulation. Experiments show that the incorporation of nonlinear viscoelasticity makes the simulated tissue look much more realistic than other models while the computation time is increased by only approximately 5% compared with the original non-linear elastic models. The visual refresh rate can achieve about 40Hz on a regular office computer. View full abstract»

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  • Coaching the Wii

    Page(s): 54 - 57
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (564 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Aging or sedentary behavior can decrease motor capabilities causing a loss of autonomy. Prevention or re-adaptation programs that involve practice of physical activities can be precious tools to fight against this phenomenon. ¿Serious¿ video game have the potential to help people to train their body mainly due to the immersion of the participant in a motivating interaction with virtual environments. We propose here to discuss the results of a preliminary study that evaluated a training program using the well-known WiiFit game and Wii balance board device in participants of different ages. Our results showed that participants were satisfied with the program and that they progressed in their level of performance. The most important observation of this study, however was that the presence of a real human coach is necessary in particular for senior participants, for security reasons but also to help them to deal with difficulties with immersive situations. View full abstract»

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  • Interactive force sensing feedback system for remote robotic laparoscopic surgery

    Page(s): 58 - 63
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2071 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper presents hardware and software systems which have been developed to provide haptic feedback for teleoperated laparoscopic surgical robots. Surgical instruments incorporating quantum tunnelling composite force measuring sensors have been developed and mounted on a pair of Mitsubishi PA-10 industrial robots. Feedback forces are rendered on pseudo-surgical instruments based on a pair of PHANTOM Omnis, which are also used to remotely manipulate the robotic arms. The paper describes the measurement of forces applied to surgical instruments during a teleoperated procedure, in order to provide a haptic feedback channel. This force feedback channel is combined with a visual feedback channel to enable a surgeon to better perform a two-handed surgical procedure on a remote patient by more accurately controlling a pair of robot arms via a computer network. View full abstract»

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  • Design of haptic interface for brickout game

    Page(s): 64 - 68
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (4087 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper introduces a haptic interface for brick games. Conventionally the game user uses mouse or keyboard to play the brick game. However, these input devices do not provide intuitive interface for the game and any tactile feedback to the user. We use a haptic dial to add tactile feedback to enhance game effects in addition to visual and sound effects. The user changes the position of the paddle by spinning the dial knob and feels various tactile feedbacks according to the game context. Tactile feedbacks include friction, jog dial, barrier, detent, and any combinations of these effects which are programmed based on the amount, frequency, and direction of torque along the rotational path. These effects are used as either penalties or useful tools. The proposed haptic dial interface makes the game more fun and gives a very intuitive interface to the game user. View full abstract»

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  • Industrial Haptic Robot Guidance System for assembly processes

    Page(s): 69 - 74
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (874 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Human haptic sense is an important aspect for numerous assembly processes, especially in manual assembly, where the worker uses this sense to identify the occurring contact forces and tries to reduce them. Such an act minimizes the risk of unintended collisions or deformation of parts and thus guarantees a successful completion of the assembly process. Although the assembly of small/medium lots is normally carried out manually by a worker, the help of robots is mandatory in some cases, where the ability of the human being is hindered, such as the assembly of heavy parts. Some industrial robotic systems are available in the market, in which the robot is guided by a human operator to perform some tasks. However, those systems lack the haptic feedback. This work aims at the design and evaluation of an industrial Haptic Robot Guidance System (HRGS). The main role of the HRGS in assembly is to combine both human haptic sense and industrial robot capability. In this paper some research issues and approaches for the design of HRGS are introduced. Some preliminary experimental results are also included. View full abstract»

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  • Design and evaluation of a haptically enable virtual environment for object assembly training

    Page(s): 75 - 80
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (622 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Virtual training systems are attracting paramount attention from the manufacturing industries due to their potential advantages over the conventional training practices. Significant cost savings can be realized due to the shorter times for the development of different training-scenarios as well as reuse of existing designed engineering (math) models. This paper presents a newly developed virtual environment (VE) for training of procedure tasks i.e. object assembly. Unlike existing VE systems, the presented idea tries to imitate real physical training scenarios by providing comprehensive user interaction, constrained within the physical limitations of the real world. These physical constrains are imposed by the haptics devices in the virtual environment. As a result, in contrast to the existing VE systems that are capable of providing knowledge generally about assembly sequences only, the proposed system helps in cognitive learning and procedural skill development due to its high physically interactive nature. In addition a novel evaluation framework has also been proposed to evaluate system efficacy through a large scale of user-testing, which is often been neglected by design experts in the field of VEs. Results confirm the practical significance of evaluating a VE design by involving sample of real and representative users through the effective discovery of critical usability problems and system deficiencies. Results also indicate benefits of collecting multimodal information for accurate and comprehensive assessment of system efficacy. Evaluation results and improvement of existing design are also presented. View full abstract»

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  • Towards a real-time system for teaching novices correct violin bowing technique

    Page(s): 81 - 86
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (597 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We describe the ongoing development of a system to support the teaching of good posture and bowing technique to novice violin players. Using an inertial motion capture system we can track in real-time: i) a player's bowing action (and measure how it deviates from a target trajectory); ii) whether the player is holding their violin correctly. We detail some initial experiments that show that vibrotactile feedback can guide arm movements in one and two dimensions. We then present some preliminary findings from integrating the motion capture and feedback components into a prototype real-time training system. The advantages of vibrotactile feedback are that: i) it does not use the students' visual and auditory systems which are already involved in the activity of music making; ii) it is an intuitive way to guide body movements. View full abstract»

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  • Virtual fabric paint environment using touch and gesture for vocational training

    Page(s): 87 - 92
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1107 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The objective of this work is to enhance the pace of learning occupational skills by developing multimedia enriched computerized vocational training programs targeted towards the illiterate and neo-literate sections of a society. This is achieved by developing virtual computer based vocational training environments. The experience of these environments is enriched with touch and gesture based technology. This paper talks about the creation of virtual vocational training scenario of a fabric painting application. We have successfully created a working prototype which brings out the real experience of fabric painting to the end user. Emphasis is placed on human-computer interactions that will allow simplistic interface for illiterate or neo-literate individuals. This approach of `virtual' computer-based vocational training environment has great potential that stimulates self-learning processes of these vocational skills to a diverse audience with varying skill sets. View full abstract»

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  • On the repeatability of octree-based rheology Mass-Spring-Damper model

    Page(s): 93 - 98
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (948 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this paper, we ascertain repeatability (reappearance) of shape deformation of the octree-based particle model representing an arbitrary rheological object. The repeatability (reappearance) of shape deformation is carefully checked by parameter calibration and deformation evaluation based on two kinds of pushing operations. The Mass-Spring-Damper (MSD) model as the octree-based particle model flexibly generates a residual displacement. Our approach is based on computer calculation under calibration of physical parameters. The calibration quality strongly depends on data structure of rheological object. It is done by GA (Genetic Algorithm) minimizing the sum of differences between computational virtual and experimental real shapes. Finally, concerning to calculation time and shape precision, we also see that our octree-based model is better than our voxel-based model. View full abstract»

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  • Part-based PCA for facial feature extraction and classification

    Page(s): 99 - 104
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (919 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    With the latest advances in the fields of computer vision, image processing and pattern recognition, facial expression recognition is becoming more and more feasible for human computer interaction in Virtual Environments (VEs). In order to achieve subject-independent facial feature extraction and classification, we present part-based PCA (Principal Component Analysis) for facial feature extraction and apply a modified PCA reconstruction method for expression classification. Part-based PCA is employed to minimize the influence of individual differences which hinder facial expression recognition. For the purpose of obtaining part-based PCA, a novel feature detection and extraction approach based on multi-step integral projection is proposed. The features can be automatically detected and located by multi-step integral projection curves without being manually picked and PCA is applied in the detected area instead of the whole face. To solve the problem that the features extracted from PCA are not the best features suitable for classification, we propose a modified PCA reconstruction method. We divide the training set into 7 classes and carry out PCA reconstruction on each class independently. We can identify the expression class by measuring the similarity between the input image and the reconstructed image. Experiments demonstrate that when tested on the JAFFE database, the part-based PCA outperforms traditional PCA of higher recognition rate. View full abstract»

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  • Modelling of haptic vibration textures with infinite-impulse-response filters

    Page(s): 105 - 110
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (754 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Vibration feedback models are known to be effective to convey tactile characteristics in virtual environments and they can be rendered with existing haptic devices. In this paper we develop a novel texture model based on a spatial distribution of infinite-impulse-response filters which operate in the time domain. We match the impulse response of the filters to measured acceleration profiles obtained from scanning of real-world objects. We report results on surfaces with varying roughness characteristics including surfaces with stochastic variations and surfaces with regular features. Our novel use of infinite-impulse-response filters allows us to represent multiple frequencies of the response, and to unify the haptic texture model to arbitrary surfaces unlike the conventional rendering method for patterned textures based on a decaying sinusoid. We employ an existing hand-held mobile scanning set-up with a visually-tracked probe, which provides acceleration and force profiles. Our simple capturing devices also removes any need for a robotic manipulator. View full abstract»

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  • An adaptive multiplexer for multi-modal data communication

    Page(s): 111 - 116
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (446 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Recent trends in multimedia applications strive to incorporate multi-modal media, such as audio, video, graphics, and particularly haptics to enhance the user's quality of experience. However each media type has a particular Quality of Service (QoS) requirement. The efficient use of network resources and the optimal distribution of these resources to all media streams remain an important challenge. This paper presents an adaptive and intelligent multiplexer for multiple input media streams based on the application requirements and the network conditions in a limited-resources network. The multiplexer adapts its multiplexing scheme and guarantees the allocation of minimum resources that are sufficient to make haptics interactions stable. The simulation results show that the proposed multiplexer provides the application immunity to dynamic changes in the network resources, and optimizes the communication of multimedia data based on their corresponding priorities. View full abstract»

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  • Fiber-level structure recognition of woven textile

    Page(s): 117 - 122
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2657 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this paper, we present a novel automatic method for woven textile structure recognition in fiber-level. This method is based on digital image analysis techniques. It allows automatic weft yarn and warp yarn crossed-area segmentation through a spatial domain integral projection approach. Secondly, by applying unsupervised fuzzy c-means clustering on multi-scale direction invariant texture features based on gray level co-occurrence matrix, we can classify detected segments into two clusters. Finally, using a fuzzy rule based analysis on texture orientation features, the yarn crossed-area states are automatically determined. To verify the validity of this method, a number of textile images are used. The samples we choose have different weave types: plain or twill, different fiber types and yarn counts. The recognition results match the actual structure of tested samples. A possible 3D representation of woven structure identified is also shown in this paper. View full abstract»

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