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IBM Systems Journal

Issue 3 • Date 1988

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Displaying Results 1 - 12 of 12
  • Preface

    Page(s): 248 - 249
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1014 KB)  

    Although computer system families have historically been well served by unique operating systems and user interfaces, the growing tendency to install personal systems to operate as terminals to, and in networks with, work-group systems and enterpriselevel mainframes has led to fresh thinking on systems design and architecture. Interchanging people skills, programming, and data among systems requires bath working standards and common supporting software for programmers to use in interacting with the user as well as the operating system. For IBM the solution was seen as not only providing these common standards, formats, protocols, and architectures, but doing so in a manner that allowed for future growth and extensions, and that allowed applications to exploit the unique features of specific systems. IBM has chosen to call this solution Systems Application Architecture (SAA). View full abstract»

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  • Introduction to Systems Application Architecture

    Page(s): 250 - 263
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2033 KB)  

    Systems Application Architecture is a framework in which applications are developed so that they run consis-tently on major IBM computing systems. This paper presents the motivation and requirements for this framework and describes the main elements of its structure. It also discusses the effect on current processing technologies and on application development. View full abstract»

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  • Common Communications Support in Systems Application Architecture

    Page(s): 264 - 280
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2422 KB)  

    Application execution in a Systems Application Architecture (SAA) network depends on the underlying capability of the network to obtain reliable connectivity and orderly data exchange among its system components. The objectives of SAA are distributed applications, distributed processing, and distributed data, which are achieved through interconnected SAA systems supporting appropriate interfaces and architectures. The Common Communications Support of SAA affords this capability by utilizing a number of Systems Network Architecture communication architectures and international standards. These architectures provide useful data interchange within SAA components by providing services ranging from managing data links to specifying data streams for user applications. This paper discusses the role of Common Communications Support and the means for SAA users to access this support, and provides an overview of the functions and roles of various component architectures of Common Communications Support, along with their interrelationships. View full abstract»

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  • Common User Access—A consistent and usable human-computer interface for the SAA environments

    Page(s): 281 - 300
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2348 KB)  

    Systems Application Architecture (SAA) will allow customers to apply their investments in their computer operations across IBM's three major computing environments that exhibit unique characteristics in terms of architecture, workstations, operating systems, and system services. User experience is one of these investments. The Common User Access (CUA) establishes a degree of standardization that is compatible with the differences in the three environments and that supports transfer of users' experiences. CUA is based on a user-interface architecture that identifies fundamental elements of structure. The intent is to provide a transfer of users' conceptual-level learning across different and evolving technologies. CUA specifies user-interface components and guidelines to be used by application designers, and it provides a basis for programming development tool specifications. View full abstract»

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  • Application enabling in SAA

    Page(s): 301 - 305
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1292 KB)  

    The Common Programming Interface (CPI), one of the four key elements of Systems Application Architecture, comprises a growing set of programming languages and services. The CPI indirectly offers end-user access through the Common User Access by providing the application developer with the necessary interfaces. The CPI addresses the application development requirement for portability of applications and programmer skills. As the CPI continues to expand, it addresses the requirements for access to host data through intelligent workstations and for transparent access to remote data and applications. View full abstract»

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  • Enabling the user interface

    Page(s): 306 - 314
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1554 KB)  

    Presenting a consistent interface to the user is one of the objectives of Systems Application Architecture (SAA). The development of SAA applications is simplified by providing enabling interfaces which help an application developer support the SAA user interface. Rather than providing a single-level en-abling interface, SAA offers a spectrum of levels spread over two interfaces: the SAA Presentation Interface and the SAA Dialog Interface. This gives the application developer the freedom to choose the appropriate level of interface for the application. View full abstract»

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  • Integrating applications with SAA

    Page(s): 315 - 324
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1634 KB)  

    Advances in computing technology and reductions in development cost have greatly increased the number of people who use computers, and have expanded the number and types of applications available to them. People want their applications to share data and to be consistent with one another with respect to terminology and appearance. They also frequently need access to applications and data on computers in other locations; the computers may be models and types that these persons do not normally use. Integrating application functions in a seamless environment is an important step toward satisfying some of these requirements. This paper discusses what integrated applications are, why they are valuable, and how Systems Application Architecture (SAA) can make it easier to develop them. View full abstract»

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  • Designing SAA applications and user interfaces

    Page(s): 325 - 347
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2515 KB)  

    This paper describes a framework for developing applications that conform to Systems Application Architecture (SAA). The paper shows a high-level approach to creating a design; it gives examples of early modeling work with the user interface; and it appraises SAA through the eyes of several system designers. The usability of user interfaces has been evaluated through the modeling of office tasks. That experience is described, showing the influence of the SAA Common User Access (CUA) on the model and the influence of the model on CUA. Discussed is a design for distributed applications that fit within the SAA framework and the influence of SAA on the design of integrated distributed applications. View full abstract»

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  • Distributed files for SAA

    Page(s): 348 - 361
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    Files are still a major way of storing data in computer systems, and they are a significant part of the information to be handled by the distributed processing networks that are developing. Systems Application Architecture is supporting distributed files. In this paper, the goals, benefits, and problems of providing this support are discussed, along with the role of Distributed Data Management architecture. View full abstract»

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  • Distributed database for SAA

    Page(s): 362 - 369
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    This paper describes, in general terms, distributed database and its relationship to Systems Application Architecture (SAA). It shows the importance to effective distribution of IBM's Structured Query Language (SQL), the database element of the Systems Application Architecture Common Programming Interface (SAA CPI). The paper defines five levels of distribution, showing how each fits real-world application requirements. Finally, it outlines the magnitude of the task. View full abstract»

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  • SAA distributed processing

    Page(s): 370 - 383
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1832 KB)  

    Discussed are motivations for distributed versus centralized data processing, the relative advantages of each, and the trade-offs involved as they relate to Systems Application Architecture (SAA). Presented is a taxonomy of the various approaches to designing applications to operate in a distributed manner. SAA support for these modes is described. The management of an enterprise-wide network of systems is discussed. View full abstract»

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  • The Cross System Product application generator: An evolution

    Page(s): 384 - 390
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1414 KB)  

    An application generator is a generalized application development tool with which professional programmers develop applications using a fourth-generation language. This paper describes the requirements that led to the Cross System Product application generator, and how the product progressed from a single-environment product to the current multienvironment product. Also described are how the Cross System Product fits within Systems Application Architecture and how that may affect the future of the Cross System Product. View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

Throughout its history, the IBM Systems Journal has been devoted to software, software systems, and services, focusing on concepts, architectures, and the uses of software.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
John J. Ritsko
IBM T. J. Watson Research Center5