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Proceedings of the IEE - Part IA: Electric Railway Traction

Issue 1 • Date 1950

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Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 46
  • Proceedings at the Convention on Electric Railway Traction

    Page(s): 1 - 3
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  • Railway electrification in Great Britain

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    The paper is a brief review of the development of railway electrification in Great Britain excluding the lines of the London Transport Executive. The position with regard to the different traction systems and the trend towards uniformity is stated, and reference is made to the improvements in design of the more important items of equipment. Statistical information is given indicating the variety of the equipment in use and the magnitude and scope of the services operated. View full abstract»

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  • Review of British underground railway practice

    Page(s): 27 - 41
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    This paper points out the necessity for an exceptionally high degree of reliability throughout the arrangements tobe provided for operation of any underground railway, and it then describes the steps taken by the London Transport Executive to ensure freedom from interruption in the supply of electrical energy to all services upon which the movement of trains and the welfare of passengers depend. View full abstract»

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  • The electrification of the Liverpool Street-Shenfield lines, Eastern Region¿British Railways

    Page(s): 42 - 59
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    The paper briefly surveys the history of the suburban services out of Liverpool Street station and gives the reasons for the electrification of the line to Shenfield, with an indication of the anticipated improvements. The system of electrification adopted is that with current collection from an overhead line at 1 500 volts d.c., and the paper describes the power supply arrangements, the cable transmission system, the substations, the overhead line equipment, the multiple-unit rolling stock and the car sheds. Manufacture of the equipments had commenced before the war and a certain amount of overhead-line equipment had been installed on site, but all work was suspended early in 1940. The scheme was taken in hand again after the war, and the line was opened to service on the 26th September, 1949. Estimated figures for current consumption and maximum demands are given in the paper, but the service has not been in operation for a sufficient length of time to allow these estimates to be confirmed or any operating experience to be gained with the equipments. View full abstract»

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  • Achievements of British engineering in overseas railway electrification

    Page(s): 60 - 70
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    The paper reviews the achievements of British engineering in the field of railway electrification overseas, undertaken in widely differing circumstances, and designed to meet many and various conditions of operation. It includes a section devoted to Diesel-electric railway traction, and is divided into the following main headings: (1) Reasons for electrification, (2) Development of electrical equipment, (3) Typical electrifications in South Africa, New Zealand, Australia, and India, (4) Diesel-electric railway traction. The following tables summarizing equipment supplied are included: (1) Rolling stock equipment, (2) Substation equipment, (3) Diesel-electric equipment. View full abstract»

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  • The effect of electric traction on the track

    Page(s): 80 - 87
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    This paper surveys the detrimental effects of multiple-unit electric trains on surface track in England. Electric track deterioration is almost entirely of mechanical origin, accentuated by intense traffic and similarity in the design and operation of trains embodying power bogies with axle-hung motors. The effects of track damage are cumulative and are enhanced by maintenance difficulties peculiar to electric lines. Reference is made to the factors influencing the performance of the track as a whole, and to more specific forms of rail damage among which periodic side-cutting figures importantly and is at present being studied by high-speed cinematography. The effects of electrification on the capital and maintenance costs of track are briefly considered. View full abstract»

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  • Railway electrification: spacing of substations

    Page(s): 88 - 92
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    The economic distribution of the plant required for a railway electrification system is determined by the spacing of the substations. The paper deals theoretically with the factors influencing substation spacing, and contains formulae for calculating the ideal spacing in terms of the maximum allowable voltage-drop. Formulae are also included for determining the ideal spacing in terms of the maximum permissible overload-current setting of the track-feeder circuit-breakers to satisfy the condition that the current due to a short-circuit in the worst position must always be sufficient to trip the circuit-breakers. View full abstract»

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  • Multiple-unit trains

    Page(s): 93 - 95
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    The paper summarizes the main operational characteristics of multiple-unit electric-traction rolling stock and its relative merits as compared with locomotive-hauled rolling stock. References to train formations operated by London Transport and the various Regions of British Railways on the electrified sections are included in the Appendix. Observations are made on major design aspects and the difference between tunnel and surface-line working. Comments are made on the make-up of trains, associated with equipment requirements, and the governing limitations from the economic viewpoint are outlined. Reference is also made to uncoupling and the provision of automatic equipment. View full abstract»

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  • Tractive resistance of electric trains

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    The paper deals with the tractive resistance of passenger trains in still air, and with the effect of wind at various angles Reference is mado to the advantages to be gained by streamlining. Particulars arc given of tests to determine the additional tractive resistance in tunnels and on curves. Finally, the resistance of goods trains is discussed, with reference to such information as is available. View full abstract»

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  • Railway electrification: design of overhead equipment

    Page(s): 107 - 119
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    The paper discusses the problems facing the designers of overhead equipment for the electrification of railways. The principal factors are treated in the following order: basic considerations, copper section and catenary system, span length and sag in the catenary, structures and foundations, layout, general design, track equipment fittings, switching, bonding of rails, feeder cables, lightning protection. In each case reference is made to present British practice, and occasional reference is made throughout the paper to Australian, Brazilian, Indian, Polish, and South African railways, with which both the authors have been intimately connected. View full abstract»

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  • Conductor-rail installation and maintenance, and collector shoe-gear

    Page(s): 123 - 133
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    The paper gives brief details of the conductor-rail systems used for electric traction by the London Transport Executive1 and British Railways. The specification, testing, installation and maintenance of the 100- and 150-lb/yd flat-bottom conductor rails used on the Southern Region's 660-volt d.c. third-rail system which conforms to the Railway (Standardization of Electrification) Order, 1932, are described in detail. The associated electrical track equipment is reviewed. Details are given of the proposed new standard 106- and 150-lb/yd flat-bottom and 130-lb/yd rectangular conductor rails. The types of collector shoe-gear used by the London Transport Executive and Southern Region are also described. View full abstract»

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  • Lightning protection on the South African electrified railways

    Page(s): 134 - 139
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    After describing the lightning conditions which exist in the South African electrified-railway areas, the paper deals with the practical aspects of lightning protection as applied to electric locomotives, electric motor-coaches, overhead track-equipment and traction substations associated with 3 000-volt d.c. electrified systems. A brief history of the early difficulties experienced and the measures taken to overcome them is given, and Tables are included indicating the actual results obtained from various protective devices. Finally, the author's conclusions are appended as to the most satisfactory means of protecting each section of a 3 000-volt d.c. electrified system. No account is taken of lightning effects on the extra-high-voltage transmission lines associated with the substation supplies as this subject is common to all high-voltage transmission systems and has been covered in other papers. View full abstract»

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  • Traction substations: their general layout, operation and maintenance

    Page(s): 140 - 151
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    The paper reviews 40 years of experience in the design, construction and maintenance of traction substations on British surface railways. It draws attention to the effect that the hazard of short-circuit over many miles of conductor rail has upon the arrangement and design of plant and apparatus. The number, size and type of converting unit are the main factors that dictate the design of the building, and in the approximate period 1915¿1930 this influence was almost wholly determined by the rotary convertor. This unit has now been completely outmoded by the mercury-arc rectifier, and the consequential effects on the design and layout of the substation are discussed. The Southern Region of British Railways uses both types of installation, of which the rotaryconvertor section, although nearing the end of its life and scheduled for replacement, is still working to capacity at a reasonable cost. The increase in the capital cost of plant and building since 1915, and the manner in which the relative costs have been affected by the different type of converting plant, are discussed. The operation and maintenance of the two systems of conversion are compared, costs of operation are analysed, and the influence of supervisory control is disclosed. The experience so far gained is applied to a suggested design for substations of the future. View full abstract»

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  • The 3000-volt mercury-arc-rectifier traction substations of the South African Railways

    Page(s): 152 - 167
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    The paper gives a brief description of the electrified sections of the South African Railways and the general details of the mercury-arcrcctifier traction substations provided on the different sections. The reasons are given for the decision to use inverters and rectifiers with grid control for compounding on the extensions to the electrified sections in Natal. Reference is also made to the type of plant selected for the new projects. The characteristic curves for the different types of plant are submitted, and the advantages and disadvantages are indicated. The difficulties which have been experienced under service conditions and the remedial measures taken are discussed. View full abstract»

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  • Electric locomotives of the British Railways

    Page(s): 178 - 187
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    The paper gives a general description of electric locomotives built for service on British Railways, but assumes that the usual system of series-parallel contactor control of traction motors, with field weakening by diversion or tap, issufficiently well known to need no detailed description here. The locomotives described are all d.c. machines and operate either at 630¿660 volts or at 1,500 volts. Interesting features of the various designs are described, some operatingresults are shown, and there is a note on the bogie arrangements on the Eastern Region and Southern Region locomotives. Inview of their unorthodox control system, the Southern Region locomotives have been given special attention, and mention is made of the work now in hand for future locomotive designs on this Region. View full abstract»

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