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Object/Component/Service-Oriented Real-Time Distributed Computing, 2009. ISORC '09. IEEE International Symposium on

Date 17-20 March 2009

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Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 57
  • [Front cover]

    Page(s): C1
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  • [Title page i]

    Page(s): i
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  • [Title page iii]

    Page(s): iii
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  • [Copyright notice]

    Page(s): iv
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  • Table of contents

    Page(s): v - viii
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  • Message from the Symposium Co-Chairs

    Page(s): ix
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  • Message from the Program Co-Chairs

    Page(s): x
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  • Conference Committees

    Page(s): xi - xiii
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  • Secondary reviewers

    Page(s): xiv
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  • Fundamental Design Principles for Embedded Systems: The Architectural Style of the Cross-Domain Architecture GENESYS

    Page(s): 3 - 11
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1000 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The GENESYS (Generic Embedded System) project is a European research project that aims to develop a cross-domain architecture for embedded systems. The requirements and constraints for such an architecture are documented in the ARTEMIS strategic research agenda in the form of seven key challenges. This paper presents the architectural style of GENESYS by listing the key architectural principles, such as: strict component orientation, separation of computation from communication, availability of a common time, hierarchical system structure, adherence to message passing, state awareness, fault isolation and integrated resource manage-ment. This paper explains how these architectural principles contribute to solve the seven key challenges in the ARTEMIS strategic research agenda. View full abstract»

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  • Delivering Sustainable Capability on Evolutionary Service-oriented Architecture

    Page(s): 12 - 19
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1767 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Network enabled capability (NEC) is the U.K. Ministry of Defencepsilas response to the quickly changing conflict environment in which its forces must operate. In NEC, systems need to be integrated in context, to assist in human activity and provide dependable inter-operation. In order to provide reliable and sustainable military capability, fast paced changes must be conducted without halting the operation of a capability. In this paper we present the concept of evolutionary service-oriented architecture for delivering sustainable capability. The reliability of the architecture is evaluated by simulations using a computer-based model. The simulation results indicate that the evolutionary service-oriented architecture can provide higher reliability and sustainability in the provision of capability in a dynamic environment. View full abstract»

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  • Towards an Open Dependable Operating System

    Page(s): 20 - 27
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (370 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper introduces a new dependable operating system project, called DEOS, started in 2006, and scheduled to continue for six years. In this project, a safety extension mechanism called P-Bus is to be designed, and implemented in the Linux kernel so that a future dependability attribute is implemented with P-Bus. A hardware abstraction layer, called SPUMONE, is introduced so that a light-weight operating system, called ArcOS, and a monitoring service on top of ArcOS monitors the Linux kernel to provide a safety-net for the Linux kernel. New dependability metrics are being designed to enable developers and users to decide which hardware or software solution meets their dependability requirements, and thus can be used. View full abstract»

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  • JEOPARD -- Java Environment for Parallel Real-Time Development

    Page(s): 28 - 36
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (412 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Multicore systems have become standard for desktop computers today. Current operating systems and software development tools provide straightforward means to use the additional computing power. However, a more fundamental change in the design and development of software is required to fully exploit the power of multicore systems. Furthermore, the fast growing market of embedded systems is currently largely unaffected by the introduction of multicore systems. This will change quickly in the future, which will mean that there will be a demand on efficient development of reliable embedded software that can give real-time guarantees and exploit the available power on multicore systems.The JEOPARD project addresses this demand by developing Java software tools to exploit multicore power while ensuring correctness and predictable timing. This paper gives an overview of the JEOPARD project and focuses on key technical issues such as real-time scheduling and real-time garbage collection on multi-core systems. View full abstract»

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  • Towards Configurable Real-Time Hybrid Structural Testing: A Cyber-Physical System Approach

    Page(s): 37 - 44
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (323 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Real-time hybrid testing of civil structures represents a grand challenge in the emerging area of cyber-physical systems. Hybrid testing improves significantly on either purely numerical or purely empirical approaches by integrating physical structural components and computational models. Actuator dynamics, complex interactions among computers and physical components, and computation and communication delays all hamper the ability to conduct accurate tests. To address these challenges, this paper presents initial work towards a Cyber-physical Instrument for Real-time hybrid Structural Testing (CIRST). CIRST aims to provide two salient features: a highly configurable architecture for integrating computers and physical components; and system support for real-time operations in distributed hybrid testing. This paper presents the motivation of the CIRST architecture and preliminary test results from a proof-of-concept implementation that integrates a simple structural element and simulation model. CIRST will have broad impacts on the fields of both civil engineering and real-time computing.It will enable high-fidelity real-time hybrid testing of a wide range of civil infrastructures, and will also provide a high-impact cyber-physical application for the study and evaluation of real-time middleware. View full abstract»

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  • Fault-Tolerance for Component-Based Systems - An Automated Middleware Specialization Approach

    Page(s): 47 - 54
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (486 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    General-purpose middleware, by definition, cannot readily support domain-specific semantics without significant manual efforts in specializing the middleware. This paper presents GRAFT (GeneRative Aspects for Fault Tolerance), which is a model-driven, automated, and aspects-based approach for specializing general-purpose middleware with failure handling and recovery semantics imposed by a domain.Model-driven techniques are used to specify the special fault tolerance requirements, which are then transformed into middleware-level code artifacts using generative programming. Since the resulting fault tolerance semantics often crosscut the middleware architecture, GRAFT uses aspect-oriented programming to weave them into the original fabric of the general-purpose middleware. We evaluate the capabilities of GRAFT using a representative case study. View full abstract»

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  • Compensating for Timing Jitter in Computing Systems with General-Purpose Operating Systems

    Page(s): 55 - 62
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (496 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Fault-tolerant frameworks for large scale computing clusters require sensor programs, which are executed periodically to facilitate performance and fault management. By construction, these clusters use general purpose operating systems such as Linux that are built for best average case performance and do not provide deterministic scheduling guarantees. Consequently, periodic applications show jitter in execution times relative to the expected execution time. Obtaining a deterministic schedule for periodic tasks in general purpose operating systems is difficult without using kernel-level modifications such as RTAI and RTLinux. However, due to performance and administrative issues kernel modification cannot be used in all scenarios. In this paper, we address the problem of jitter compensation for periodic tasks that cannot rely on modifying the operating system kernel. ; Towards that, (a) we present motivating examples; (b) we present a feedback controller based approach that runs in the user space and actively compensates periodic schedule based on past jitter; This approach is platform-agnostic i.e. it can be used in different operating systems without modification; and (c) we show through analysis and experiments that this approach is platform-agnostic i.e. it can be used in different operating systems without modification and also that it maintains a stable system with bounded total jitter. View full abstract»

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  • Embedded JIT Compilation with CACAO on YARI

    Page(s): 63 - 70
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (251 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Java is one of the most popular programming languages for thedevelopment of portable workstation and server applications availabletoday. Because of its clean design and typesafety, it is alsobecoming attractive in the domain of embedded systems. Unfortunately, the dynamic features of the language and its rich class library causeconsiderable overhead in terms of runtime and memory consumption. Efficient techniques to implement Java virtual machines that aresuitable for use in resource constrained environments are thusneeded. In this work we present a solution for very restrictedenvironments based on CACAO. CACAO is a just-in-time compilingvirtual machine implementation, combining high speed and small size. We have modified the original version of CACAO to run without anunderlying operating system within only 1 MB of memory. In additionwe present a new technique to selectively compile methods during theinitialization phase of real-time Java applications to preventunwanted interaction between dynamic compilation and critical tasks. Furthermore we present the YARI soft-core as the execution platformof CACAO within an field-programmable gate array. We compare ourimplementation with two well known Java processors, JOP and Sun'spicoJava-II, on the same technology. Although JOP achieves a higherclock frequency and picoJava-II occupies nearly 4 times the resourceof YARI, our solution is capable to outperform both of them by afactor of up to 2.8 and 2.2 respectively. View full abstract»

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  • A Document Centric Framework for Building Distributed Smart Object Systems

    Page(s): 71 - 79
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    We present an architectural framework that provides the foundation for building smart object systems and uses a document centric approach utilizing a profile based artefact framework and a task based application framework. Our artefact framework represents an instrumented physical smart objects as a collection of service profiles and expresses these services in generic documents. Applications for smart objects are expressed as a collection of functional tasks (independent of the implementation) in a corresponding document. A runtime component provides the foundation for mapping these tasks to the corresponding service provider smart objects. There are three primary advantages of our approach- firstly, it allows developers to write applications in a generic way without prior knowledge of the smart objects that could be used by the applications. Secondly, smart object management (locating/accessing/etc.) issues are completely handled by the infrastructure thus application development becomes rapid and simple. Finally, the programming abstraction used in the framework allows extension of functionalities of smart objects and applications very easily. We describe an implemented prototype of our framework and show examples of its use in a real life scenario to illustrate its feasibility. View full abstract»

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  • A Reconfigurable Virtual Storage Device

    Page(s): 80 - 87
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (312 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This research is motivated by the demands of personalized storage devices that fit the quality-of-service needs of each individual user. In particular, the design of a virtual storage device, that consists of multiple heterogeneous storage devices, is proposed with the capability in dynamic reconfiguration to fit the needs of users. A dynamic remapping mechanism is presented with a heap-based data structure to manage the moving of data among component storage devices for performance optimization. A lazy swapping method is then proposed to reduce the mapping overheads. The capability of the proposed design is evaluated with a prototype virtual storage device of a flash drive and a hard drive over an ex2 file system and realistic/generated workloads. View full abstract»

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  • Model-Driven Design and Organic Computing - Contradictory or Synergetic Approaches to Overcome the Embedded Software Crisis

    Page(s): 91 - 92
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (912 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This panel discusses two different approaches to overcome the embedded software crisis. On one hand, model-driven design is an approach to build software by using a hierarchy of models and automatic transformation between these models. Organic computing is building systems inspired by nature. A main purpose of this panel is to answer the question if these approaches are contradictory or can be combined in a synergetic way. View full abstract»

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  • Model-Driven Design and Organic Computing -- Two Different but Possibly Accordable Concepts for the Design of Embedded Systems

    Page(s): 93 - 94
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (552 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Model Driven Design (MDD) and Organic Computing (OC) present two different approaches to control the continually increasing complexity of technical systems which is a consequence of Moore's law. This statement holds in particular for the design of hardware and software for embedded systems. MDD is the effort to solve this challenge by a widely hierachical and modular organized design process in which the actual design is seperated from architecture. Whereas the design addresses the functional requirements, i.e. expressing the functional behaviour of the designed system in a platform-independent way, the architecture handles questions concerning infrastructure in particular, e.g. how non-functional requirements like scalability, reliability and performance are realized. In this context, architecture does not refer to a concrete hardware system, but rather to a kind of template suite or programming environment which can run on different real computer architectures. The goal of MDD is to map the platform- independent description to the architecture automatically. View full abstract»

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  • Organic Computing and Model-Driven Engineering in Embedded Systems

    Page(s): 95 - 96
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (911 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Model-driven engineering (MDE), and its various forms (such as OMG's MDA: model-driven architecture) is a software development methodology focusing on creating models and abstractions for a specific domain. It aims to increase productivity and avoid traditional SDLC problems by maximizing compatibility between systems, simplifying the process of design, and promoting understanding and communication between stakeholders and developers. Organic computing is a vision for a particular type of system, and considers what is to be delivered (self-management). MDE involves applied research into how to deliver systems. Both have the development of more effective systems as a high level objective, and so can be viewed as complementary. View full abstract»

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  • Model Driven Design and Organic Computing -- From the Viewpoint of Application Production

    Page(s): 97 - 98
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    In this position, we compare two promising approaches, model driven design and organic computing, and discuss a possible synergy between them. View full abstract»

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  • Model Driven Engineering versus Organic Computing, Two Complementary Approaches

    Page(s): 99 - 100
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    Model driven engineering (MDE) and organic computing (OC) are fashion buzzwords these years. However, are the associated techniques in competition or complementary? We first provide some definitions about these terms and then present some elements suitable for discussion during the panel. View full abstract»

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  • Model-Driven Design and Organic Computing -- Combinable Strategies?

    Page(s): 101
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    This position paper discusses the possibility to combine organic computing and model-driven design. View full abstract»

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