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Web Services, 2009. ICWS 2009. IEEE International Conference on

Date 6-10 July 2009

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Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 158
  • [Front cover]

    Page(s): C1
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  • [Title page i]

    Page(s): i
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  • [Title page iii]

    Page(s): iii
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  • [Copyright notice]

    Page(s): iv
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  • Table of contents

    Page(s): v - xiv
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  • Message from the General Chair

    Page(s): xv
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  • Message from the Program Chairs

    Page(s): xvi
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  • Message from the Application and Industry Track Chairs

    Page(s): xvii
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  • Organizing Committee

    Page(s): xviii - xix
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  • Program Committee

    Page(s): xx - xxii
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  • External reviewers

    Page(s): xxiii - xxiv
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  • IEEE Computer Society Technical Committee on Services Computing

    Page(s): xxv
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  • Keynotes

    Page(s): xxvi - xxix
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (190 KB)  

    Provides an abstract for each of the keynote presentations and a brief professional biography of each presenter. The complete presentations were not made available for publication as part of the conference proceedings. View full abstract»

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  • The SCIFC Model for Information Flow Control in Web Service Composition

    Page(s): 1 - 8
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (309 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Existing Web service access control models focus on individual Web services, and do not consider service composition. In composite services, a major issue is information flow control. Critical information may flow from one service to another in a service chain through requests and responses and there is no mechanism for verifying that the flow complies with the access control policies. In this paper, we propose an innovative access control model to empower the services in a service chain to control the flow of their sensitive information. Our model supports information flow control through a back-check procedure and pass-on certificates. We also introduce additional factors such as the carry-along policy, security class, and transformation factor, to improve the protocol efficiency. A formal analysis is also presented to show the power and complexity of our protocol. View full abstract»

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  • Markov-HTN Planning Approach to Enhance Flexibility of Automatic Web Service Composition

    Page(s): 9 - 16
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (341 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Automatic Web services composition can be achieved by using AI planning techniques. HTN planning has been adopted to handle the OWL-S Web service composition problem. However, existing composition methods based on HTN planning have not considered the choice of decompositions available to a problem which can lead to a variety of valid solutions.In this paper, we propose a model of combining a Markov decision process model and HTN planning to address Web services composition. In the model, HTN planning is enhanced to decompose a task in multiple ways and hence be able to find more than one plan,taking both functional and non-functional properties into account. Furthermore, an evaluation method to choose the optimal plan and some experimental results illustrate that the proposed approach works effectively. View full abstract»

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  • Control Flow Requirements for Automated Service Composition

    Page(s): 17 - 24
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (374 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Automated composition of services is a key functionality for the adoption of the service-oriented development paradigm. Solving this problem in practice requires the ability to consider asynchronous stateful services and to express complex composition requirements which may span different phases of the life-cycle of component services. In this paper we present a novel automated service composition approach which addresses these challenges by associating so-called 'objects' to services, and by introducing a simple yet powerful notation to express composition requirements on them. We recast this view of the problem as a specific form of planning; our experiments on a prototype implementation witness the ability of our approach to deal with realistic scenarios and requirements that cannot be tackled by other current approaches. View full abstract»

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  • WS-OBJECTS: Extending Service-Oriented Architecture with Hierarchical Composition of Client-Side Asynchronous Event-Processing Logic

    Page(s): 25 - 34
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (298 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    There is a growing need for a new type of WS-*/SOA standards that could facilitate hierarchical, object-oriented composition of client-side executable code. This is especially true for the sorts of client-side logic embedded in AJAX and rich Internet applications, virtual worlds and MMORPGs; code that deals with issuing requests to servers, processing their responses, rendering UI, interacting with users, and processing asynchronous events from other client nodes. The paper offers an analysis of client-side composition patterns, a brief explanation why they lack adequate support from the existing web technologies, and design guidelines for client-side component integration environments to follow. The proposed guidelines have been successfully implemented in a prototype system. Our analysis is thus strongly rooted in reality; it is based on real experiences with concrete application scenarios. The paper concludes by highlighting the key architectural aspects of our implementation with respect to the principles listed earlier. View full abstract»

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  • A Plug-in Architecture for Self-Adaptive Web Service Compositions

    Page(s): 35 - 42
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (253 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Several approaches have been proposed to introduce self-management capabilities for Web service compositions.However, most of these works are limited as they are not extensible, i.e., new self-adaptation features cannot be supported, and even if that is possible then still this cannot be done dynamically while the composite services are running.In addition, many of these works are not based on the service composition standard WS-BPEL. In this paper, we propose a plug-in architecture for self-adaptive Web service composition, in which self-adaptation features are well-modularized in aspect based plug-ins. Our approach supports application-specific adaptation scenarios, is easily extensible, and allows self-adaptation logic to be hot-deployed on running process instances. We have implemented this architecture and several plug-ins using the dynamic aspect-oriented workflow language AO4BPEL. View full abstract»

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  • Selective Querying for Adapting Hierarchical Web Service Compositions Using Aggregate Volatility

    Page(s): 43 - 50
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (275 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Environments in which Web service compositions (WSC) operate are often dynamic. We address the problem of which service to query for up-to-date information in order to adapt a hierarchical WSC, given that queries are not free. Previously,the value of changed information (VOC) has been proposed to select those services for querying whose revised non-functional information is expected to bring about the most change in the composition. In this paper, we present an approach for utilizing VOC in the context of a WSC composed of services and lower level WSCs, which induces a natural hierarchy over the composition. View full abstract»

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  • What are the Problem Makers: Ranking Activities According to their Relevance for Process Changes

    Page(s): 51 - 58
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (356 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Recently, a new generation of adaptive process management technology has emerged, which enables dynamic changes of composite services and process models respectively. This, in turn, results in a large number of process variants derived from the same process model, but differing in structure due to the applied changes. Since such process variants are expensive to maintain, the process model should be evolved accordingly. In this context, we need to know which activities have been more often involved in process adaptations than others, such that we can focus on them when reconfiguring the process model. This paper provides two approaches for ranking activities according to their involvement in process adaptations. The first one allows to precisely rank the activities, but is expensive to perform since the algorithm is at NP level. We therefore provide as alternative an approximation ranking algorithm which computes in polynomial time. The performance of the approximation algorithm is evaluated and compared through a simulation of 3600 process models. Statistical significance tests indicate that the performance of the approximation ranking algorithm does not depend on the size of process models, i.e., our algorithm can scale up. View full abstract»

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  • Distributed Cross-Domain Change Management

    Page(s): 59 - 66
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (679 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Distributed systems increasingly span organizational boundaries and, with this, system and service management domains. Web services are the primary means of exposing services to clients, be it in electronic commerce, Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) or on cloud platforms and are being used and integrated with customer-managed applications as well as in complex mashups. Maturing cross-domain relationships and an increase in loose coupling and ad-hocness makes managing configuration changes, e.g., changes in interfaces or endpoints, increasingly relevant. Traditional service management processes within organizations, in particular change management, relies on a central configuration management database (CMDB) to assess the impact a change has on other components of the system. However, this approach does not work in a cross-domain environment, due to the lack of a central CMDB, centralized management processes, and knowledge by service providers which clients depends on their respective services. This paper proposes the Change 2.0 approach to cross-domain change management based on an inversion of responsibility for impact assessment and the facilitation of cross-domain service process integration. We present the requirements imposed by cross-domain change management, the Change 2.0 architecture, and a brief evaluation of its benefits. View full abstract»

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  • Applying Sanitizable Signature to Web-Service-Enabled Business Processes: Going Beyond Integrity Protection

    Page(s): 67 - 74
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (269 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper studies the scenario where data in business documents is aggregated by different entities via the use of Web services in streamlined business processes. The documents are transported within the Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP) messages and travel through multiple intermediary entities, each potentially makes changes to the data in the documents. The WS-security provides integrity protection by allowing portions of a SOAP message to be signed using eXtensible Markup Language (XML) signature scheme. This method however, has not considered the situation where a portion of data may be modified by another entity, therefore a need to allow the originating system to control which intermediary entity is authorized to change which portion of the data. The XML signature scheme also does not provide the final recipient the trust for the intermediary entity that makes the changes. In our paper, we study the security requirements for a streamlined business process, and proposes a novel scheme using sanitizable signature on SOAP messages to complement the XML signature to address not only integrity protection but also control of change as well as establishment of trust for intermediary entities. We show how the proposed scheme can be incorporated into the existing standards and be customizable to achieve flexible use of both the vanilla and sanitizable signatures as required in a business scenario. With the proposed technique, IT systems can be more loosely coupled and reap the benefits of distributed systems, such as delegation of work and encapsulation of business logic. View full abstract»

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  • MACE: A Dynamic Caching Framework for Mashups

    Page(s): 75 - 82
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (446 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The recent surge of popularity has established mashups as an important category of Web 2.0 applications. Mashups are essentially Web services that are often created by end-users. They aggregate and manipulate data from sources around the World Wide Web. Surprisingly, there are very few studies on the scalability and performance of mashups. In this paper, we study caching as a vehicle for enhancing the scalability and the efficiency of mashups. Although caching has long been used to improve the performance of Web services, mashups pose some unique challenges that necessitate a more dynamic approach to caching. Towards this end, we present MACE - a cache specifically designed for mashups. In designing the MACE framework this paper makes three technical contributions. First, we present a model for representing mashups and analyzing their performance. Second, we propose an indexing scheme that enables efficient reuse of cached data for newly created mashups. Finally, this paper also describes a novel caching policy that analyzes the costs and benefits of caching data at various stages of different mashups and selectively stores data that is most effective in improving system scalability. We report experiments studying the performance of the MACE system. View full abstract»

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  • Wrap Scientific Applications as WSRF Grid Services Using gRAVI

    Page(s): 83 - 90
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (317 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Web service models are increasingly being used in the Grid community as way to create distributed applications exposing data and/or applications through self describing interfaces. Scientific research is one key field in which the benefits are apparent as individual services can be orchestrated into experimental workflows that model the research process and facilitate verification and extension. However, many applications are not web enabled and the task of creating services from scratch is cumbersome in part due to the range of complex technologies, tools, standards and languages involved. In this paper we present gRAVI, a WSRF Web service wrapping tool that allows scientists to rapidly expose applications, scripts and workflows as Web services. gRAVI generated services include GSI security, Grid scheduling, state notifications, persistence and data staging. All service code, scripts and definition files are created automatically without any developer input. gRAVI services are created in standard Grid Archive files and are able to be moved and deployed to any compliant container with no requirement for any gRAVI or Grid infrastructure on the target machine. gRAVI supports deployment to the open science cloud Nimbus, whilst also being able to parse Taverna workflow definition files to create strongly typed services. View full abstract»

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  • Web Service Mashup Middleware with Partitioning of XML Pipelines

    Page(s): 91 - 98
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (324 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Traditionally, the composition of Web services to create mashups has been achieved by using an application server as a mediator between a client browser and services. To avoid this bottleneck, mashups are sometimes implemented so that Web service composition takes place directly from the end userpsilas browser. Creating such implementations is difficult because developers must manage the separation of software into various distributable pieces, in different languages, and coordinate their communication. In this paper we describe a middleware for managing Web service mashups in a disciplined, and flexible way. We build upon the established abstraction of XML pipelines, but describe a new approach for selectively partitioning pipeline components between a browser client and application server. We provide a performance evaluation for a common mashup application scenario. View full abstract»

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