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Issues for Networked Interpersonal Communicators (Digest No: 1997/139), IEE Colloquium on

Date 16 May 1997

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  • IEE Colloquium on Issues for Networked Interpersonal Communicators (Digest No.1997/139)

    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (52 KB)  

    The following topics were dealt with: Java-from smartcard to supercomputer; information sharing-beyond the network computer; from the large screen to the small screen-retaining the designer's design for effective user interaction; an architecture for adaptive retrieval of networked information resources; maintaining multimedia information quality in distributed environments with resource-poor computers; and technology convergence issues for networked interpersonal communications View full abstract»

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  • Maintaining multimedia information quality in distributed environments with resource poor computers: using machine independence to send dynamic methods to adapt with the dynamic media data

    Page(s): 5/1 - 5/5
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (356 KB)  

    The explosion in the use of Internet technology has heralded a new era in computer-based communication, however this technology is limited by the inflexibility of this architecture and its fixed connectivity. The last few years have seen a rise in the provision of devices for inter-personal communication. These include Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs), laptops, and networked computers. These devices have many advantages, particularly mobility, but tend to be resource poor in terms of bandwidth, memory and software. The challenge is to integrate this newly emerging mobile technology with the existing legacy systems in order to explore their latent power. This means that new methods and techniques are required to overcome this lack of resources while still delivering the highest possible information quality. In this work we show how machine independence can be used to aid in the maintenance of information quality by augmenting the functionality of the client/server relationship, in particular for challenging applications such as multimedia communication. We have achieved this by extending the relationship to include dynamic (run-time) distributed configuration so that quality based configuration at the server end can be properly exploited, and intermediate distributed services, such as information filtering used to reduce bandwidth requirements, can be more easily utilised. This method has shown us much promise in allowing resources to be used in a distributed manner and overcome the problem of maintaining information quality in resource poor end computer system environments View full abstract»

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  • An architecture for adaptive retrieval of networked information resources

    Page(s): 4/1 - 4/6
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (408 KB)  

    In this paper, we describe some of the ongoing weak at Sussex to develop an architectural framework in which we can examine how to construct network cognizant applications for bandwidth constrained environments, such as in mobile environments. We are building a WWW image proxy service in which applets can turn images in active objects which adapt to the bandwidth available. Finally, a major aim of this project is to get a framework into place within which we can explore the possibilities for application driven protocols, where each type of media delivery uses a different protocol defined again by some other entity View full abstract»

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  • Issues for networked interpersonal communications: the convergence of technology…with what?

    Page(s): 6/1 - 6/4
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (300 KB)  

    We consider some of the range of technological, sociological and infrastructure issues pertinent to the future development of networked interpersonal communication devices and their applications. Various technological developments - microelectronics, the superior reliability of RAM over disc, cheap communications - make network computers feasible. Various social developments (notably the World Wide Web and other network utilities) suggest sustained uptake of network computers is likely. Therefore they will be built, and they will be used View full abstract»

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  • From the large screen to the small screen-retaining the designer's design for effective user interaction

    Page(s): 3/1 - 3/4
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (404 KB)  

    Previous HCI studies have shown that interface design choices are important. Good designers make careful choices in designing for the interface display space. There is now a class of interfaces, however, which are designed for one screen display space but which will be accessed and presented on devices-like handheld PCs-with much smaller displays than the designer might have anticipated. We discuss the likely interaction problems and consider potential solutions. We are beginning to investigate this area and outline the framework we are developing View full abstract»

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  • Information sharing-beyond the Network Computer

    Page(s): 2/1 - 2/4
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (400 KB)  

    The Network Computer is often described as an appliance for accessing networked information, with the World Wide Web as its principal raison d'etre. But the information publishing/browsing paradigm on which the Web is based supports only a part of users' needs for information sharing. Many forms of cooperative work demand coordinated access to shared information that is updated to reflect progress. In large-scale networks this entails support for replicated information objects and distributed event processing. Their potential is illustrated with reference to the Mushroom Project, an ongoing research project whose goal is to develop a software framework to support synchronous and asynchronous cooperative activities View full abstract»

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