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Intelligent Transportation Systems Magazine, IEEE

Issue 4 • Date winter 2014

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Displaying Results 1 - 21 of 21
  • [Front cover]

    Page(s): C1
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  • Table of contents

    Page(s): 1
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  • Call for Papers IEEE Intelligent Transportation Systems Magazine

    Page(s): 2
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  • Editorial Board

    Page(s): 3
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  • ITS at the Cutting Edge [Editor's Column]

    Page(s): 3
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Transferring ITS Research to the Real World [President's Message]

    Page(s): 4 - 79
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  • Join the IEEE Intelligent Transportation Systems Society

    Page(s): 5
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  • Three Decades of Driver Assistance Systems: Review and Future Perspectives

    Page(s): 6 - 22
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    This contribution provides a review of fundamental goals, development and future perspectives of driver assistance systems. Mobility is a fundamental desire of mankind. Virtually any society strives for safe and efficient mobility at low ecological and economic costs. Nevertheless, its technical implementation significantly differs among societies, depending on their culture and their degree of industrialization. A potential evolutionary roadmap for driver assistance systems is discussed. Emerging from systems based on proprioceptive sensors, such as ABS or ESC, we review the progress incented by the use of exteroceptive sensors such as radar, video, or lidar. While the ultimate goal of automated and cooperative traffic still remains a vision of the future, intermediate steps towards that aim can be realized through systems that mitigate or avoid collisions in selected driving situations. Research extends the state-of-the-art in automated driving in urban traffic and in cooperative driving, the latter addressing communication and collaboration between different vehicles, as well as cooperative vehicle operation by its driver and its machine intelligence. These steps are considered important for the interim period, until reliable unsupervised automated driving for all conceivable traffic situations becomes available. The prospective evolution of driver assistance systems will be stimulated by several technological, societal and market trends. The paper closes with a view on current research fields. View full abstract»

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  • Integration of Drive-by-Wire with Navigation Control for a Driverless Electric Race Car

    Page(s): 23 - 33
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    This article presents the design and implementation of a drive-by-wire system and a navigation control system for an autonomous Formula SAE race car. The result is the development of a platform for research into autonomous driving which can be easily replicated. Drive-by-wire actuators for acceleration, braking and steering of the vehicle are discussed, as well as the embedded low-level control system. The high-level navigation system features sensor fusion of a 6-dof IMU with a standard GPS and the integration of an automotive LIDAR. Operation of the vehicle is via a multi-threaded program with asynchronous IO and is based upon recording and driving waypoints. In addition to independent safety interlocks, active safety systems are an integral part to both the drive-by-wire and navigation systems. View full abstract»

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  • A Comparison of Detrending Models and Multi-Regime Models for Traffic Flow Prediction

    Page(s): 34 - 44
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    Short-term traffic flow prediction received considerations from different fields, because of its essentialness in traffic engineering and its theoretical difficulties. In this paper, we studied two important approaches of traffic flow prediction: detrending methods and multi-regime methods. First, we compared their differences in modeling philosophy and compared their merits as well as shortcomings. Then, we tested several representative prediction models of these two approaches on the openly accessible PeMS traffic flow database to find their merits and shortcomings. The obtained results threw some interesting light on how to select the appropriate traffic prediction models in practices. View full abstract»

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  • Business Models Towards the Effective Integration of Electric Vehicles in the Grid

    Page(s): 45 - 56
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    To achieve an effective integration of the electric vehicle in the grid, not only technical issues must be solved, but also a new regulatory context and business models must be proposed. This paper proposes two electric vehicle integration business models; one resembles the mobile-phone business, while the other is more based on current practices in the electricity-supply business. Decomposition into three layers: physical, management, and business, is used to describe those business models. Furthermore, electric vehicle charging scenarios are presented to illustrate how the proposed business models fit in each of the potential situations. Finally, several practical study cases are presented. View full abstract»

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  • Insurance Telematics: Opportunities and Challenges with the Smartphone Solution

    Page(s): 57 - 70
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    Smartphone-based insurance telematics or usage based insurance is a disruptive technology which relies on insurance premiums that reflect the risk profile of the driver; measured via smartphones with appropriate installed software. A survey of smartphone-based insurance telematics is presented, including definitions; Figure-of-Merits (FoMs), describing the behavior of the driver and the characteristics of the trip; and risk profiling of the driver based on different sets of FoMs. The data quality provided by the smartphone is characterized in terms of Accuracy, Integrity, Availability, and Continuity of Service. The quality of the smartphone data is further compared with the quality of data from traditional in-car mounted devices for insurance telematics, revealing the obstacles that have to be combated for a successful smartphone-based installation, which are the poor integrity and low availability. Simply speaking, the reliability is lacking considering the smartphone measurements. Integrity enhancement of smartphone data is illustrated by both second-by-second lowlevel signal processing to combat outliers and perform integrity monitoring, and by trip-based map-matching for robustification of the recorded trip data. A plurality of FoMs are described, analyzed and categorized, including events and properties like harsh braking, speeding, and location. The categorization of the FoMs in terms of Observability, Stationarity, Driver influence, and Actuarial relevance are tools for robust risk profiling of the driver and the trip. Proper driver feedback is briefly discussed, and rule-of-thumbs for feedback design are included. The work is supported by experimental validation, statistical analysis, and experiences from a recent insurance telematics pilot run in Sweden. View full abstract»

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  • Lei Yu, Ph.D., P.E. [ITS People]

    Page(s): 71 - 72
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  • e-Mobility Laboratory (EML) at KAIST [ITS Research Lab]

    Page(s): 73 - 77
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  • Review of, "Advances for In-Vehicle and Mobile Systems" [Book Review]

    Page(s): 78 - 79
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  • Using Inquiry to Expose Undergraduates to ITS

    Page(s): 80 - 83
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    In our rapidly evolving world, asking the right questions and properly defining problem boundaries is paramount to successful engineering design. These practices are especially vital for Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS), which can address a wide range of transportation problems, but which also can exacerbate these same problems. For example, ITS solutions that address the narrowly defined problem of improving traffic flow in an urban area can lead to more regional sprawl, and therefore more traffic and so on-reinforcing a negative feedback loop with ugly results. If the problem is instead framed as trying to reduce commuting times, entirely different and more sustainable ITS solutions may be found. The best planners proceed with caution to avoid prescribing solutions to perceived problems; instead, they take care to understand challenges to urban mobility and the propagating impacts that different development strategies may have. Genuine inquiry, the act of asking questions, ought to be a foundation of engineering education. Indeed, an accumulating amount of engineering education research makes the benefits of such active learning techniques impossible to ignore. Inquiry-based learning begins by posing questions, problems or scenarios in lieu of simply presenting established facts or portraying an existing path to knowledge. It places students' questions, ideas and observations at the center of the learning experience. As students engage with challenges and questions, they achieve higher levels of learning-past the stage of memorizing and reciting data-to more sophisticated methods of analysis, synthesis, and application. The instructor's role is to creatively combine best practices, including explicit instruction, and small-group and guided learning in an attempt to build on students' interests and ideas, ultimately moving students forward in their paths of intellectual curiosity and understanding. This inquiry-based approach is used to introduce a team- of Clemson students to the principles and applications of ITS in developing nations. View full abstract»

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  • 25 Years of Intelligent Vehicles Symposia

    Page(s): 84 - 85
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  • Employment opportunities solicitation

    Page(s): 85
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  • [Calendar]

    Page(s): 86
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  • 2014 Index IEEE Intelligent Transportation Systems Magazine Vol. 6

    Page(s): 1
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  • [ITS Fun]

    Page(s): 88 - C3
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Aims & Scope

The IEEE Intelligent Transportation Systems Magazine (ITSM) publishes peer-reviewed articles that provide innovative research ideas and application results, report significant application case studies, and raise awareness of pressing research and application challenges in all areas of intelligent transportation systems. 

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief


Miguel Ángel Sotelo

Department of Computer Engineering

University of Alcalá