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Collaborative Technologies and Systems, 2009. CTS '09. International Symposium on

Date 18-22 May 2009

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Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 106
  • Welcome

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): i - iii
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  • Advisory Committee

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): iv - x
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  • Understanding social computing participation with visual exploration tools

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): xi - xii
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  • Cooperation, sociality, and human systems design

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): xiii
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  • Venturing into social software

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): xiv
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  • The next generation of science collaboratories

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): xv - xvi
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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  • From CSCW to new workstations: The itsme project

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): xvii - xix
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    In the last 30 years, the desktop metaphor has become the standard user interface for workstations, with its pros (e.g., ease of learning) and cons (e.g., interaction constraints for skilled users, lack of context awareness). In this tutorial, we present itsme, an initiative to create the next-generation workstation - especially designed for users who think that what they do holds value. Much of what we present derives from CSCW research, while Interaction Design research shapes the project, as well as the involvement of a wide and heterogeneous community of contributing people. The early design phases of the project led to the definition of a new metaphor for personal computing, called ‘stories and venues’. The metaphor is being adopted for the development of a radically new front-end for the Linux operating system. View full abstract»

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  • Approaches to ontology integration: Federated SPARQL queries and SWRL

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): xx - xxi
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    When considering OWL ontologies, a common approach to information integration is mapping equivalency relationships between classes, properties, and individuals in the ontologies. Here, we describe two approaches to solving the problem of automatically matching identical individuals in separate ontologies and merging information about those individuals. The first approach involves a graphical tool for building and executing federated SPARQL queries to integrate information from distributed sources. In such a distributed environment, inference engines will not perform well, and the logical relationships between resources in the ontologies is encoded in the queries themselves, which may be saved and re-executed to build applications that are sensitive to dynamic changes in the data sources. The second approach involves building SWRL rules to identify equivalent individuals between ontologies. Applying the rules will cause new OWL assertions about the individuals to be generated, allowing an application to harness the power of existing OWL inference engines. Finally, we will demonstrate an application of these techniques using currently available technology. View full abstract»

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  • Trust negotiations for collaborative environments: Principles, concepts and systems

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): xxii - xxiv
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    This tutorial will present an overview of the trust negotiation paradigm, an innovative authorization approach that has been widely investigated in the recent years. We will present the basic concepts related to trust negotiation, and provide an overview of the different approaches proposed to conduct negotiations. We will focus on trust negotiation research advances, that is, how the trust negotiation paradigm has changed and improved since it was first proposed and how it has been integrated with other research areas. In particular, we will present trust negotiations recent improvements with respect to privacy preserving technologies and cryptographic techniques. Both theoretical aspects and architectural aspects of trust negotiations will be discussed. We will analyze and thoroughly compare existing work and study the various advantages/disadvantages of each proposal. Examples of trust negotiations projects that will be discussed include PeerTrust, Trust-X, Unipro, RT, Traust and others. As a representative example, we will illustrate the research project conducted at Purdue University and University of Milan, referred to as Trust-X. We will discuss the unique features of Trust-X and show the approaches supported by Trust-X to carry on trust negotiations. We will also present the recently added features to guarantee anonymous Trust Negotiations. Interesting architectural aspects of Trust-X will also be discussed along with the key implementation features. Performance and evaluations will be conducted. We will briefly discuss also on-going project, such as the migration of Trust-X in peer-to-peer platform and the required extensions to achieve advanced trust negotiations in peer-to-peer systems. To help the attendees' understanding and intuition, we will use several examples and discuss potential application domains. To this extent, we will show demos of Trust-X functioning and of other existing trust negotiation systems. View full abstract»

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  • Collaboration services: Ensuring operational success

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): xxv - xxvi
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    Collaboration services promise to improve the engagement and effectiveness of humans across geospatial, temporal, and organizational boundaries. However, there also are many examples of collaboration failures. After a brief introduction to collaboration services, this tutorial will describe several successful deployments of state-of-the-art collaboration environments and exemplify and demonstrate the use of collaboration services to enhance human activities. We will summarize key lessons learned and report a generalized process to increase the likelihood of successful collaboration. The tutorial lasts a full day and is primarily a lecture with video demonstrations. An on-line version of the tutorial will be made accessible at http://itc.mitre.org. View full abstract»

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  • No more ‘soft’ science: Quantitative evaluation of collaboration effectiveness

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): xxvii - xxviii
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    Researchers and evaluators are often asked to give quantitative measures on topics that do not easily lend themselves to such measurement. Collaboration is one such topic: it is acknowledged to be a critical success factor for all kinds of organizations, but research and evaluation often lags because of the difficulty of measurement. This tutorial will introduce a range of quantitative methods for evaluating collaboration, on three levels: group-level experiments, micro-level measures (individuals), and macro-level measures (organizations.) I will walk participants through the methods where I have the most experience, and also mention a number of other methods, some very new, which may become increasingly valuable. View full abstract»

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  • The importance of confidence & trust in complex collaborative systems

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): xxix - xxx
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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  • Demo I Microsoft Surface and the Single View Platform

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): xxxi - xxxii
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
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  • Demo II COMPOSE framework for decision support and collaborative data analysis applications

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): xxxiii - xxxiv
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  • Demo III Collaborative workflows in earth science data mining

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): xxxv - xxxvi
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
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  • Demo IV Service Oriented Architecture governance using semantics and BPMN

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): xxxvii - xxxviii
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    This talk will present the results of pilot projects that have been conducted by the US Army and OSD AT&L. OWL/RDF were used to describe various data sources and to build an ontology of the domain where the data sources were in operation. The ontologies were developed using a semantic wiki. The ultimate use for the semantic descriptions is to semantically enable any Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) operated by the Department of Defense by using the semantics of the data sources and domain to define the services. In this way the services can be easily discovered and properly used. Further analysis of the domain of the SOA can be performed by using SPARQL to query the resulting knowledge base. BPMN (Business Process Modeling Notation) was used to define the governance processes required to insure that the project was conducted in accordance with data governance policies as defined by OSD. The BPMN models were executed by a BPM (Business Process Management) execution engine that was interfaced to the semantic wiki. A dash board was developed that facilitated the monitoring and enforcement of the governance policies in real-time by the executives funding the pilot and the managers of the project. View full abstract»

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  • SPRUCE: Systems and Software Producibility Collaboration and experimentation environment

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): xxxix - xl
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  • Demo VI Emergent analytics for enterprise management

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): xli - xlii
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    This talk will present the results of an Army sponsored project. The objective of the project was to develop a semantic knowledgebase designed to offer increased visibility into the Army portfolio. The first step in this project was to develop a seed ontology of the Army's enterprise architecture. The process used to develop the ontology was driven by a set of analytic questions that needed to be answered by queries to the knowledgebase. It was a collaborative, bottom-up effort from start to finish. The members of the team, ontologists and subject matter experts, worked together using a semantic wiki to gain consensus on the structure and meaning of the ontology. Once a suitable seed ontology was created, the project was increased in scale and the team began to collect large amounts of data, primarily about programs, software services, and capabilities within the Army's portfolio, as well as common business processes, missions and operational environments. This data came from many different systems within the Army and other DoD agencies, it was integrated using the enterprise architecture ontology. As the knowledgebase was populated with data, the ontology continued to evolve within the collaborative environment to respond to new data sets and data needs. The knowledgebase has been used to analyze the contents of the Army portfolio enabling the Army to make more informed budgetary decisions and also gain a vastly better understanding of the software services that they have and how they can be combined and used to offer new, vital capabilities to soldiers at the tactical edge. View full abstract»

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  • Abstract user interface for collaborative environments

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): xliii
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  • Multimedia Collaborative Adaptation Middleware for personalization E-learning

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): xliii - xliv
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  • A dynamic clustering construction for wireless sensor networks

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): xliv
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  • Universal Monitoring Platform for Interactive Real-Time Expansive networks (UMPIRE)

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): xliv - xlv
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  • SPRUCE: Systems and Software Producibility Collaboration and Evaluation Environment

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): xlv
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  • AFRL trusted layered sensing knowledge base

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): xlvi
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  • Sensor web enablement (SWE) information integration for trusworthiness evaluation (SIITE)

    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): xlvi
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