By Topic

Frontiers in Education Conference, 1997. 27th Annual Conference. Teaching and Learning in an Era of Change. Proceedings.

Date 5-8 Nov. 1997

Go

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 125
  • Proceedings Frontiers in Education 1997 27th Annual Conference. Teaching and Learning in an Era of Change

    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (1747 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Author index

    Page(s): xxviii - xxxvi
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (767 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Panel Discussion: Computer Science Accreditation - Past, Present and Future

    Page(s): 1231
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (70 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Deans Session: Resource, Priorities, Decisions and the Delivery of Engineering Education

    Page(s): 1233
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (50 KB)  

    Summary form only given, as follows. Engineering Deans will provide an insight to various methodologies and factors affecting the decision making process in institutions representative of a national crosssection. The views and policies of those who manage and lead engineering education will address the priority assignments and expenditure planning of resources in view of their impact on the preparation of undergraduates. Issues considered includes cost-benefit, outcomes, retention, examples of viable policies and approaches, and pitfalls. The session will be presented in a panel format and audience interaction. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Carnegie Mellon's 'Engineering Education Scholars Workshop' Program: Merits, Flaws and Short-term Impacts

    Page(s): 1327
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (70 KB)  

    Summary form only given. The first two of Carnegie Mellon University's annual NSF Engineering Education Scholars Workshops were held July 21-26, 1996, and July 13-18, 1997. The purpose of the week-long workshops was to provide new and future engineering faculty with information and skills that would enable them to more effectively assume the responsibilities of an academic career. The workshop included a variety of lectures, panel discussions and activity sessions, each addressing topics such as designing and teaching effective classes, advising graduate students, writing research proposals, and dealing with diversity issues. The short-term evaluations of these workshops included field observations, evaluation surveys, and a pretestlposttest evaluation of learning on intended educational objectives. The preliminary long-term evaluation involved tracking the on-line discussions, and off-line interactions, of the network of new engineering educators established during the workshop. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Exploring the Educational Frontiers

    Page(s): 1437
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (47 KB)  

    Summary form only given, as follows. In this interactive session, the participants and presenters will identify and analyze the frontiers, the new issues, that engineering educators should explore in the near future. We will assume the state of the art in engineering education, including concepts such as cooperative leaming, teamwork, communication skills, and authentic design, and move on from there. Three of the areas to be discussed are: 1) the intellectual development of students, 2) the culture of the classroom, and 3) interdisciplinary teaching and the changing discipline structure of engineering. For each of the areas, one speaker will give a short presentation summarizing what is currently known and then engage the audience in a discussion of its impact on the educational process, its fundamental research questions, and methods for investigating those questions. In the last 30 minutes, participants will brainstorm other frontiers and discuss how the engineering educational community can begin addressing them. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Creative problem solving workshops for engineering students

    Page(s): 1428 - 1430 vol.3
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (284 KB)  

    Educational and enterprise managers agree that too many graduate engineers lack teamwork and effective communication skills. The same deficiency can be observed regarding creative problem-solving strategies. In order to help students to overcome these weaknesses we have structured and developed two workshops to formulate and solve problems in a creative manner, at the level of first year engineering courses. In this paper we give a description of the different structure and functionality of both workshops. One of them was incorporated in the regular program of the first year math course. The other one was offered to the best first year students (20) and it was run in the second academic term of the year. In both workshops we aimed at producing a “creative teaching-learning environment” by using cooperative learning techniques and divergent thinking methods. We have also developed a new assessment method to evaluate students' performance based on quality and originality of questions and proposed problems rather than on effectiveness and accuracy of routine answers. Finally, the marks obtained by the students showed that they developed more effective learning and creative problem-solving strategies when compared with similar students working under traditional schemes. A personal interview with each of the students also verified the previous statement View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • An autonomous race car design competition

    Page(s): 1583 - 1587 vol.3
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (528 KB)  

    This paper describes an innovative collaboration between industry and academia in creating a meaningful design experience for undergraduate electrical engineering students. The design project involves designing, building and testing an autonomous model race car. The course culminates in a competition. The competition included students from UC Davis, San Jose State University, and UC Berkeley and is sponsored by National Semiconductor. A primary goal of the competition is to provide undergraduates with a meaningful design experience with an emphasis on electronic circuits. This contest has a different flavor from the well-established IEEE Micromouse competition in the sense that it places the emphasis on the design and construction of an electronic sensing and control system without the microprogramming necessary solve a maze (although a microprocessor can certainly be used). It is hoped that by placing the emphasis on the circuitry the course will encourage more undergraduates to go into the field of electronic circuit design. The learning experience offered by the competition is shaped by, among other things, the format and rules of the competition, the students' preparation in terms of circuit and control system theory and practice, and by the format of the design project course. This paper describes the competition in detail and discuss factors affecting the educational experience View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Follow-up on a Freshman engineering course experiment

    Page(s): 1438 - 1440 vol.3
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (268 KB)  

    In 1994-95, the authors conducted new freshman engineering courses at West Virginia University, USA, which integrated computers, math and design while giving a more rigorous introduction to engineering. At the end of the first year, as they reported at the 1995 FIE, there was no difference in retention between the experimental course and the “standard” classes. This paper examines longer term effects. For this study, transcripts for engineering students from the previous study who remained in engineering after 2 1/2 years were examined. It was found that the experimental sections had about 20% higher retention, but this difference is not highly significant. During transcript analysis, some interesting patterns in “liberal arts” were observed. It is concluded that more rigor in their freshman engineering courses certainly does not hurt, and might help retention. The authors remain satisfied that they delivered a high quality experience, but the College has not chosen to adopt the approach View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • The Manufacturing Engineering Education Partnership program outcomes assessment results

    Page(s): 1196 - 1200 vol.3
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (404 KB)  

    Formal assessment of project outcomes and deliverables is usually required by granting organizations. This paper describes the Manufacturing Engineering Education Partnership (MEEP) project's outcomes assessment results. This curriculum innovation and facilities development program was implemented by a team of institutions across four time zones, partnering with a national research laboratory and industry and was sponsored by the Department of Defense's Technology Reinvestment Program (TRP). This paper highlights some of the project's assessment results and reviews some of the elements that made this partnership a success. Several project assessment tools used show that all constituents involved in the program: students, faculty and industrial partners, consider this program a success. Results demonstrate that the product of this program-The Learning Factory-which integrates design and manufacturing into the engineering curriculum, is a worthwhile effort and responds successfully to industry needs. MEEP courseware is available on the WWW as well as printed and CD-ROM View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Formulation and development of mathematical models for engineering problems: an experience on the integration of theory and the laboratory

    Page(s): 1521 - 1525 vol.3
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (376 KB)  

    The structure, the objectives and the methodology of a new engineering course are described. The course is intended as a facilitating step connecting the basic portion of an engineering program and the engineering sciences. As such, it invests into a synthesis of different topics of mathematics and numerical methods, and the observation and quantification of physical phenomena to be modeled. The main objective of the course is the coaching of students for the art of problem formulation or modeling. This is done, extensively, with the application of educational methodology characterized as problem solving and case study, with the use of original experimental data generated in class by the students View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Incorporating multicomputer hardware-software design concepts into the undergraduate curriculum through physical implementation

    Page(s): 1146 - 1148 vol.3
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (276 KB)  

    This paper presents a set of activities that have been undertaken within the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department at the University of Puerto Rico-Mayaguez in order to aid in the development of an undergraduate parallel processing academic and research environment. Specifically, a plan of action that allows upper-level ECE students to collaborate in the construction of parallel processing systems using low-cost commercially available FPGA hardware and software prototyping tools is presented. The activities, which require minimal infrastructure, are designed to take the students through a complete system design cycle, from specifications to hardware/software prototype integration and are also geared towards the facilitation of the development of course materials and/or lab modules for the electronics' sequence of core and elective courses offered by our electrical and computer engineering department. These activities include the design and implementation of the hardware and software interfaces necessary to construct a fully functional microcontroller-based processing node for multiprocessing applications View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Experimental validation of learning accomplishment

    Page(s): 1367 - 1372 vol.3
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (564 KB)  

    This paper reports on educational assessment: measures to validate that a subject has been learned. Outcomes described are from actual UCLA Computer Science courses, but the approach is independent of subject matter. There is a bibliography describing application of the methods presented here to other subjects and school levels. That bibliography summarizes an extensive literature including assessment in distance learning and elementary school situations. The text here outlines ideas and derivations, and the references enable deeper understanding, but a reader can use these procedures without either. The paper describes a way to apply them and to display students' learning. The paper contributes new ways to indicate student achievement and distinguish individuals with subject mastery from others tested. This is by figures shown here that enable teachers and students to understand and apply this form of testing. The measures use probability and are based on concepts of information. The method is generally applicable. It is related to earlier work on a computerized learning system called Plate that handled a wide variety of subjects at many educational levels. This paper describes ways to use an unconventional assessment approach to rapidly determine concepts not yet absorbed. New methods presented here are those the author developed in classes he taught. Ideas and tools in this paper could empower others to expand and enrich their teaching and the learning processes it is to assist View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Introducing reality when educating engineers-how much is too much?

    Page(s): 1457 - 1458 vol.3
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (160 KB)  

    When the author joined the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Western Ontario, his teaching intentions were greatly influenced by eight years work experience with structural engineering consulting firms. His original objective was to bring the real world into the classroom, to illustrate structural engineering with real examples as a means of injecting both energy and motivation into the learning process, and, occasionally, to present his own experiences as evidence for the need to master some difficult, or dry, topic. The students' response to date has been quite positive. As the author considers course improvements for the coming year, the question that emerges is “Is there a limit on how much reality can be injected into course curriculum?” The author discusses this issue View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Active participation by sophomore students in the design of experiments

    Page(s): 1526 - 1529 vol.3
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (288 KB)  

    To achieve the greatest impact, subject matter should be taught in a manner that will engage the student's interest and connect each topic with the student's own lives and experiences. To motivate and aid the student in understanding the principles underlying the experiment, we should be using methods that stimulate their creativity and actively involve them in the learning process. Unfortunately, many laboratory experiments have become cook book situations in which the technology has obscured the working of the basic principles and the student has achieved little move than recording data or observing mysterious results. The utilization of simplified experiments that the students help design will keep the principle under investigation in clear view and should promote a better learning experience. In teaching the core principles of any program, it is crucial to apply the theoretical principles to the solution of a variety of common problems in which the student comes into contact in their everyday lives. A good instructor could present one example problem after another or assign many homework problems until the students demonstrated a complete understanding of the subject. However, by directly involving the student in the design and preparation of an experiment, the student is prepared to observe the direct relationships of the principles during the progress of the lab experiment View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Spreadsheet analysis of fluid mechanics problems

    Page(s): 1334 - 1337 vol.3
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (584 KB)  

    This paper presents a study to obtain solutions to some fluid mechanics problems by spreadsheet analysis. By utilizing some of the many features available in spreadsheets, which are increasingly gaining popularity in the industry and academia, different aspects of fluid flow problems can be easily and graphically examined. It has been successfully used to study a majority of topics covered in a typical undergraduate fluid mechanics textbook. Some of the topics covered were determination of hydrostatic pressure and forces, buoyancy and stability, Bernoulli's equation and open channel flow. The spreadsheet solutions provided a simple means to solve fluid mechanics problems and proved to be effective tool in teaching undergraduate technology students View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Experimental, cooperative labs in a first course in computer architecture

    Page(s): 1149 - 1153 vol.3
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (508 KB)  

    Laboratory sessions for a first course in computer architecture require a considerable amount of thought. This is especially true if one of the goals of these labs is to capture, in a cooperative learning environment, some of the scientific method that is inherent in physical science labs. This paper describes the nature of these labs and gives examples. In addition, it discusses the merits of using the scientific method and the cooperative learning methodology in such laboratories. The labs have concentrated on the scientific method and included cooperative learning for only one of eight semesters. Qualitative instructor evaluations and quantitative (although not comparative) student evaluations indicate that the concentration on the scientific method and the introduction of cooperative learning has increased the effectiveness of the laboratory sessions View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Concurrent education for manufacturing engineering

    Page(s): 1302 - 1307 vol.3
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (744 KB)  

    Concurrent engineering is the blending of different disciplines via design/build teams in order to design a product and design the process to manufacture the product at the same time. This same principle can be applied in the training of industrial mechanical and manufacturing engineers and technologists. Engineering education has traditionally separated manufacturing oriented topics according to their primary function such as processes, materials, production management, and taught them as separate entities which fails to acknowledge and exploit an inherent symbiosis. Students are well schooled in the basics but often lack the agility to synthesize and creatively modify production systems to reflect the ever changing demands of world class manufacturing. Manufacturing is a many faceted endeavor which combines art, science and empirical modification. Mathematics is taught by doing math; manufacturing engineering should be taught by doing manufacturing in a systems environment that confronts students with the type of problems they will be faced with as they attempt to compete in today's globally competitive environment. As manufacturing systems become more agile, engineering graduates need to keep pace. This paper discusses the concepts involved and gives several approaches with implementation examples View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Increasing participation of women in the engineering curriculum

    Page(s): 1463 - 1464 vol.3
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (160 KB)  

    Undergraduate and graduate programs in engineering should strive to attract the best talent and resources to the discipline. These programs should provide students with a firm foundation in the relevant fundamentals and prepare students for effective positions in industry and academia. It is important that the fundamental theories be correlated with practical examples from industry, e.g. automotive, aerospace, and software industries, to demonstrate the applications of the theories and to excite the students to investigate other practical possibilities on their own. There are many challenging and fulfilling career options available in the engineering discipline after graduation. What are some of the barriers that are preventing women from participating fully in the engineering discipline and how can we overcome them? There are 3 phases where the situation of women participation in the engineering curriculum needs to be assessed: (1) pre-engineering education phase-recruitment; (2) engineering education phase-retention; and (3) post-engineering education phase-placement and advancement View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • SUNFEST-research experience for undergraduates

    Page(s): 1126 - 1131 vol.3
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (552 KB)  

    This paper describes our experience over ten years with a Summer Research Program for Undergraduates (SUNFEST-Summer Undergraduate Fellowship in Sensor Technologies). The program provides the students with a comprehensive experience that is centered around-but not limited to-doing research and includes several enhancement programs. This paper describes the overall organization of the program, the nature of the projects, activities and programs, the selection process, outcomes and benefits. So far, 95 students have participated and about 70% of them have gone on to graduate school View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Teaching microprocessor design and testing

    Page(s): 1154 - 1157 vol.3
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (332 KB)  

    This paper describes the motivation for and experience in developing a senior design course which focuses on the implementation aspects of computer architecture. This course is specifically designed for undergraduate computer engineering curricula. The course objective is to place a RISC CPU design in the context of currently available components and modern design methodologies. The course description and lab assignments that lead to the design of a RISC CPU as the final project are presented. The difficulties, the authors encountered and the laboratory experience are reported View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Supporting collaborative, problem-based learning through information system technology

    Page(s): 1252 - 1256 vol.3
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (604 KB)  

    This paper describes a suite of flexible software tools (CoMMIT-Collaborative Multi-Media Instructional Toolkit) that provides computer support for a variety of educational models including cooperative, distance, and problem-based learning. Students using CoMMIT have worked both synchronously and asynchronously in a variety of domains. The CoMMIT system provides a comprehensive, collaborative learning environment that includes integrated modules for authoring, student learning and student evaluation. This paper briefly introduces each of the three CoMMIT modules and focuses on the WWW-based student module using a problem-based learning (PBL) case to illustrate its functionality. The CoMMIT student module was recently used and evaluated against a paper-based PBL case that required students to collaborate on the design of an information system. An evaluation of the results is given View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Distance education: integrating technology into computer science education

    Page(s): 1373 - 1377 vol.3
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (560 KB)  

    This is a limited study of the effectiveness of 3 approaches to teaching one unit of an information technology course. The emphasis is on comparing distance learning with live lecture approaches. In their comparisons, the authors did consider a complete digital video course vs. a complete lecture course vs. a lecture course which included these video interviews. The main result of the paper is that there is no significant difference in the effectiveness of a distance learning approach compared to traditional approaches. However, the distance learning approach has a slight, but insignificant, advantage in its outcomes View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.