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Circuit Theory, Transactions of the IRE Professional Group on

Issue 1 • Date December 1953

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Displaying Results 1 - 8 of 8
  • A Problem in Synthesis

    Page(s): 6 - 18
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  • Quasi-Distortionless Filter Functions

    Page(s): 39 - 54
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    If the first few central moments of a pulse-like function applied to the input of a filter are equated to the corresponding moments of the pulse-like output function, or if the input and output are expressed as power series in time and the first few coefficients of the two time series are equated (allowing for a constant multiplier and either a positive or negative delay), the general quasi-distortionless filter network function is specified. Such filter functions are derived and described in this paper. The simpler functions turn out to be easily realizable, practical, and minimum phase. They sometimes justify the maximally flat function as optimum in the quasi-distortionless sense and in other cases yield functions which are even better when compared on the basis of the gain-bandwidth product of an amplifier interstage system. Also, these functions make the mechanism of delay or prediction and operations (such as that of taking the derivative of an input signal) quite clear. The general approach of this of low frequency paper can be extended to arrive at end generalize the problem of low frequency compensation in low-pass amplifiers. View full abstract»

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  • Unbalanced RLC Networks Containing Only One Resistance and One Real Transformer

    Page(s): 55 - 70
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    Any transfer function, in order to be physically realizable as a lossless coupling network terminated in a single resistance, must have an even or odd polynomial as its numerator. Such a function, representing a transfer admittance, a transfer voltage ratio, or a transfer impedance, can be realized by the method of this paper as a lossless lattice network terminated in resistance and possessing no mutual inductance. If the numerator of the transfer admittance or voltage ratio is even and the numerator of the transfer impedance is odd, these lattices can always be reduced to unbalanced networks. No ideal transformers are needed in final network; only one real transformer is required, where a real transformer is defined as one th%-hn coupling coefficient smaller than one and finite magnetizing inductance. View full abstract»

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  • A Method to Solve Very Large Physical Systems in Easy Stages

    Page(s): 71 - 90
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    Physical systems with very large number of variables (say with tens of thousands of variables) may be solved with already available digital computers by tearing the system apart into a large number of small subdivisions, solving each subdivision separately, afterward interconnecting the partial solutions by a set of transformations to obtain outright the exact solution of the original system, Among the many advantages of the tearing (or tensorial) method is the red 3 ction of the amount of original calculations to a small fraction of about 2/n2where n is the number of subdivisions. Another advantage is the reduction of the number of elements in inverse matrices to a fraction smaller than 1/sqrt{n}. The same saving of labor appears also in smaller systems employing slide-rule calculations. View full abstract»

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  • Matrix Analysis of Linear Time-Varying Circuits

    Page(s): 91 - 105
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    This paper presents a general mathematical technique for studying the response and stability of linear time-varTying circuits that contain parameters whose magnitudes vary in a periodic manner with the time, The method presented reduces the solution of the circuit differential equation to that of computing powers of matricesQ For purposes of illustration, the method is used to determine the response of an electric circuit consisting of a constant resistance and inductance in series with a periodically varying capacitance. Tile cases of square-wave and sawtooth-wave variations of the variable parameter are considered in detail. View full abstract»

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  • Foster's Reactance Theorem

    Page(s): 106
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