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Automated Software Engineering - Workshops, 2008. ASE Workshops 2008. 23rd IEEE/ACM International Conference on

Date 15-16 Sept. 2008

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Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 48
  • [Title page]

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): i
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  • [Copyright notice]

    Publication Year: 2008
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  • ARAMIS 2008 International workshop on Automated engineeRing of Autonomous and run-tiMe evolvIng Systems

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): iii
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    First Page of the Article
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  • Scope

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): iv
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  • Committee

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): v
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  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): vi
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  • Algorithms for efficient symbolic detection of faults in context-aware applications

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 1 - 8
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1543 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Context-aware and adaptive applications running on mobile devices pose new challenges for the verification community. Current verification techniques are tailored for different domains (mostly hardware) and the kind of faults that are typical of applications running on mobile devices are difficult (or impossible) to encode using the patterns of ldquotraditionalrdquo verification domains. In this paper we present how techniques similar to the ones used in symbolic model checking can be applied to the verification of context-aware and adaptive applications. More in detail, we show how a model of a context-aware application can be encoded by means of ordered binary decision diagrams and we introduce symbolic algorithms for the verification of a number of properties. View full abstract»

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  • A development process for context-aware adaptive services

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 9 - 16
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (7794 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Pervasive computing infrastructure makes it possible for mobile users to run software services on extremely heterogeneous and resource-constrained mobile devices. Heterogeneity and device limitedness creates serious problems for the development and deployment of mobile services that are able to run properly on the execution context and are able to ensures that users experience the ldquobestrdquo Quality of Service possible according to their needs and specific contexts of use. In this paper we show how the main issues related to the development of self-adapting context-aware services are addressed in the IST PLASTIC Project with the support of CHAMELEON, a declarative framework for tailoring adaptable services. View full abstract»

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  • Building autonomic components: The SelfLets approach

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 17 - 24
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (341 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Autonomic computing is an emergent field aiming at the development of large-scale, self-managing, distributed component-based systems. This paper presents the model and the architecture of an autonomic computing element called SelfLet, which is a building component that can be used to create autonomic systems. SelfLets can be defined by specifying their goal, behaviors, services they need to use and/or provide, and autonomic policies guiding their self-management. The SelfLet architecture has been implemented in Java and offers programming abstractions suitable to implement an application-specific logic as well as autonomic policies. As a case study we have implemented a pervasive autonomic system that manages electrical power balancing in intelligent cooperating buildings. View full abstract»

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  • Self-healing strategies for component integration faults

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 25 - 32
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (202 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Software systems increasingly integrate Off-The-Shelf (OTS) components. However, due to the lack of knowledge about the reused OTS components, this integration is fragile and can cause in the field a lot of failures that result in dramatic consequences for users and service providers, e.g. loss of data, functionalities, money and reputation. As a consequence, dynamic and automatic fixing of integration problems in systems that include OTS components can be extremely beneficial to increase their reliability and mitigate these risks. In this paper, we present a technique for enhancing component-based systems with capabilities to self-heal common integration faults by using a predetermined set of healing strategies. The set of faults that can be healed has been determined from the analysis of the most frequent integration bugs experienced by users according to data in bug repositories available on Internet. An implementation based on AOP techniques shows the viability of this technique to heal faults in real case studies. View full abstract»

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  • Incremental verification of inductive invariants for the run-time evolution of self-adaptive software-intensive systems

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 33 - 40
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (408 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The safe run-time evolution of complex software-intensive systems requires that the impact of changes can be predicted at run-time. In this paper we consider the specific case of self-adaptive software-intensive systems using an example for the coordination of autonomous vehicles. We show how incremental run-time checks can verify that changes in the rule set which governs the distributed rule-based self-adaptive behavior provides the required safety properties. We demonstrate how an existing verification technique for invariant checking is turned into an incremental one. We discuss the theoretical complexity of the incremental verification checks and also present some first evaluation results. View full abstract»

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  • Architecture support for runtime integration and verification of component-based Systems of Systems

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 41 - 48
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (446 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Systems-of-systems (SoS) represent a novel kind of system, for which runtime evolution is a key requirement, as components join and leave during runtime. Current component integration and verification techniques are not enough in such a dynamic environment. In this paper we present ATLAS, an architectural framework that enables the runtime integration and verification of a system, based on the built-in test paradigm. ATLAS augments components with two specific interfaces to add and remove tests, and to provide adequate testability features to run these tests. To illustrate our approach, we present a case study of a dynamic reconfiguration scenario of components, in the maritime safety and security domain, using our implementation of ATLAS for the fractal component model. We demonstrate that built-in testing can be extended beyond development-time component integration testing, to support runtime reconfiguration and verification of component-based systems. View full abstract»

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  • SAVVY-WS at a glance: Supporting verifiable dynamic service compositions

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 49 - 56
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (225 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Service-oriented architectures support the development of distributed and evolvable applications that live in an open world. We focus on Web service compositions through which new added-value services are provisioned by integrating pre-existing services through a workflow. We assume that such pre-existing services can be selected and bound at run time to support continuous evolution and contextual adaptive policies. We illustrate a methodology and a set of tools supporting both design-time and run-time verification of service compositions. View full abstract»

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  • Introducing service-oriented coverage testing

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 57 - 64
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (411 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Testing of service-oriented systems is challenged by loose coupling and high dynamism, which are the founding characteristics of this emerging paradigm. Traditional test approaches needs to be revised for such systems, and in particular white-box techniques cannot be applied because services only grant black-box access. We introduce here a novel methodology, called SOCT (service-oriented coverage testing), that adapts the notion of coverage testing to the service-oriented domain, by exploiting the very features of service technology. In SOCT, both the probes inserted into the instrumented service code, and the retrieval of coverage-related information are themselves implemented as pure service invocations. A TCov service is published that makes available these coverage-related services through a WSDL interface. This simple idea elegantly enables the usage of practical test adequacy criteria also to service-oriented applications. In this paper a realization of SOCT is exemplified for coverage testing of BPEL orchestrations, and is illustrated on the case study of the Virtual Scientific Bookstore. View full abstract»

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  • PLASTIC: Providing lightweight & adaptable service technology for pervasive information & communication

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 65 - 70
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (4552 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The PLASTIC project adopts and revisits service-oriented computing for Beyond 3rd Generation (B3G) networks, in particular aiming at assisting the development of services targeted at mobile devices. Specifically, PLASTIC introduces the PLASTIC platform to enable robust distributed lightweight services in B3G networking environments through: (a) A development environment for the thorough development of SLA- and resource-aware services, which may be deployed on the various networked nodes, including handheld devices; (b) A service-oriented middleware leveraging multi-radio devices and multi-network environments for applications and services deployed on mobile devices, further enabling context-aware and secure discovery and access to such services; (c) A validation framework enabling off-line and on-line validation of networked services regarding functional and non-functional properties. View full abstract»

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  • SHADOWS: Self-healing complex software systems

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 71 - 76
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3229 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    As software systems grow in size and complexity, their vulnerability to faults increases, and their reliability and manageability deteriorate. Software assurance methods which aim to alleviate this problem do not scale well. Careful design can also help eliminating faults, yet some are never addressed at design time. Software self-healing is an emerging approach to tackling this problem. Self-healing solutions presented to date commonly solve a single class of problems, or they are not applicable in production environments. The SHADOWS project focuses on self-healing of complex industrial systems. It introduces innovative technologies to enable self-healing of classes of problems not solved elsewhere. It integrates these technologies into a common solution. It further validates the solution in industrial environments. Initial results of this evaluation indicate clear advantages of SHADOWS self-healing technologies. View full abstract»

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  • Towards supporting evolution of service-oriented architectures through quality impact prediction

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 77 - 81
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1995 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The difficulty in evolving service-oriented architectures with extra-functional requirements seriously hinders the spread of this paradigm in critical application domains. This work tries to offset this disadvantage by introducing a design-time quality impact prediction and trade-off analysis method, which allows software engineers to predict the extra-functional consequences of alternative design decisions and select the optimal architecture without costly prototyping. View full abstract»

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  • List of authors

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 82
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • [Title page]

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): i
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (35 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • [Copyright notice]

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): ii
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (22 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Preface

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): iii
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Committee

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): iv
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Contents

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): v
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • A survey of social software engineering

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 1 - 12
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (384 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Software engineering is a complex socio-technical activity, due to the need for discussing and sharing knowledge among team members. This has raised the need for effective ways of sharing ideas, knowledge, and artifacts among groups and their members. The social aspect of software engineering process also demands computer support to facilitate the development by means of collaborative tools, applications and environments. In this paper, we present a survey of relevant works from psychology, mathematics and computer science studies. The combination of these fields provides the required infrastructure for engineering social and collaborative applications as well as the software engineering process. We also discuss possible solutions for the encountered shortcomings, and how they can improve software development. View full abstract»

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  • Bridging ontologies and folksonomies to leverage knowledge sharing on the social Web: A brief survey

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 13 - 18
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (321 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Social tagging systems have recently became very popular as a means to classify large sets of resources shared among on-line communities over the social Web. However, the folksonomies resulting from the use of these systems revealed limitations : tags are ambiguous and their spelling may vary, and folksonomies are difficult to exploit in order to retrieve or exchange information. This article compares the recent attempts to overcome these limitations and to support the use of folksonomies with formal languages and ontologies from the Semantic Web. View full abstract»

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