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Internet Network Management Workshop, 2008. INM 2008. IEEE

Date 19-19 Oct. 2008

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Displaying Results 1 - 10 of 10
  • A Hidden Markov Model approach to available bandwidth estimation and monitoring

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 1 - 6
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1317 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Available bandwidth estimation techniques are being used in network monitoring and management tools to provide information about the utilization of the network and verify the compliance of service level agreements. However, the use of these techniques in other applications and network environments is limited by the convergence time, accuracy, and amount of overhead that they introduce. In this paper, we propose a Hidden Markov Model-based technique to end-to-end available bandwidth estimation and monitoring that improves these performance metrics and therefore promises to expand the use of these techniques in other scenarios. The estimator, which has been implemented in a new tool called Traceband, is as accurate as Spruce and Pathload but considerably faster, and introduce far less overhead. In addition, when compared using bursty cross-traffic, Traceband is the only tool that accurately reacts to zero-traffic periods, which may be particularly useful for those applications that need to make decisions in real time. View full abstract»

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  • CleanBGP: verifying the consistency of BGP data

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 1 - 6
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (155 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    BGP data contains artifacts introduced by the measurement infrastructure which can substantially affect analysis. This is especially important in operational systems where ldquocrying wolfrdquo will result in an operator ignoring alarms. In this paper, we investigate the causes of measurement artifacts in BGP data - cross-checking and using properties of the data to infer the presence of an artifact and minimize its impact. We have developed a prototype tool, CleanBGP, which detects and corrects the effects of artifacts in BGP data, which we believe should be used prior to the analysis of such data. CleanBGP provides the user with an understanding of the artifacts present, a mechanism to remove their effects, and consequently the limitations of results can be fully quantified. View full abstract»

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  • Cross-domain fault localization: A case for a graph digest approach

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 1 - 6
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (401 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Prior research has focused on intra-domain fault localization leaving the cross-domain problem largely unaddressed. Faults often have widespread effects, which if correlated, could significantly improve fault localization. Past efforts rely on probing techniques or assume hierarchical domain structures; however, administrators are often unwilling to share network structure and state and domains are organized and connected in complex ways. We present an inference-graph-digest based formulation of the problem. The formulation not only explicitly models the inference accuracy and privacy requirements for discussing and reasoning over cross-domain problems, but also facilitates the re-use of existing fault localization algorithms while enforcing domain privacy policies. We demonstrate our formulation by deriving a cross-domain version of SHRINK, a recent probabilistic fault localization strategy. View full abstract»

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  • Towards validated network configurations with NCGuard

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 1 - 6
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (373 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Today, most IP networks are still configured manually on a router-by-router basis. This is error-prone and often leads to misconfiguration. In this paper, we describe the Network Configuration Safeguard (NCGuard), a tool that allows the network architect to apply a safer methodology. The first step is to define his design rules. Based on a survey of the networking literature, we classify the most common types of rules in three main patterns: presence, uniqueness and symmetry and provide several examples. The second step is to write a high-level representation of his network. The third step is to validate the network representation and generate the configuration of each router. This last step is performed automatically by our prototype. Finally, we describe our prototype and apply it to the Abilene network. View full abstract»

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  • Interdomain traffic engineering in a locator/identifier separation context

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 1 - 6
    Cited by:  Papers (10)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (256 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The Routing Research Group (RRG) of the Internet Research Task Force (IRTF) is currently discussing several architectural solutions to build an interdomain routing architecture that scales better than the existing one. The solutions family currently being discussed concerns the addresses separation into locators and identifiers, LISP being one of them. Such a separation provides opportunities in terms of traffic engineering. In this paper, we propose an open and flexible solution that allows an ISP using identifier/locator separation to engineer its interdomain traffic. Our solution relies on the utilization of a service that transparently ranks paths using cost functions. We implement a prototype server and demonstrate its benefits in a LISP testbed. View full abstract»

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  • Exposing server performance to network managers through passive network measurements

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 1 - 6
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (215 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We describe a novel approach to managing the application-level performance of servers within an enterprise network given only passively-collected TCP/IP headers of packets from a link connecting clients to servers. The analysis is driven by constructing, in real-time, a source-level model of the request-response exchanges between each server and all of its clients. By continuously monitoring traffic, we generate a statistical profile of numerous application-layer measures of server performance. Given these measures, and their distributions over time, a network manager can quickly triage server performance problems in generic terms without any knowledge of the servers operation or a priori interaction with the serverpsilas operators. This approach is illustrated by using a continuous, 2-month dataset taken from a border router on the UNC campus to diagnose an actual problem with a UNC web portal. View full abstract»

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  • Using visualization to support network and application management in a data center

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 1 - 6
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (364 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We argue that there is a continuum between completely manual and completely automated management of networks and distributed applications. The ability to visualize the status of the network and applications inside a data center allows human users to rapidly asses the health of the system - quickly identifying problems that span across components and solving problems that challenge fully autonomic and machine-learning based management systems. We present a case study that highlights the requirements on visualization systems designed for the management of networks and applications inside large data centers. We explain the design of the Visual-I system that meets these requirements and the experience of an operations team using Visual-I. View full abstract»

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  • Adaptive parsing of router configuration languages

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 1 - 6
    Cited by:  Papers (3)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (159 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Network functionality is growing increasingly complex, making network configuration management a steadily growing challenge. Router configurations capture and reflect all levels of network operation, and it is highly challenging to manage the detailed configurations of the potentially huge number of routers that run a network. One source of difficulty is the constant evolution of router configuration languages. For some languages, particularly Ciscopsilas IOS command language, and its relatives, these changes demand frequent maintenance of configuration parsers in any configuration management tool. The essential problem is that config parsers understand a statically determined set of inputs, requiring human intervention to modify that set. We propose an alternative design for router configuration parsers: adaptive parsers. Such parsers can infer the configuration language based on real configs and automatically adapt to changes in the config language, all with minimal human involvement. We present the design of such a parser and discuss its prototype implementation for the Cisco IOS configuration language. We have validated our prototypepsilas accuracy and efficiency by running it on the configuration files of Tier-1 ISP networks. Our results show that from only 81 configuration files, we can learn enough IOS to successfully parse all of the 819 IOS configurations in under 10 minutes. View full abstract»

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  • [Copyright notice]

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 1
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (14 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • 2008 IEEE internet network management workshop (INM)

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 1
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (11 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE