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Software Engineering Research, Management and Applications, 2008. SERA '08. Sixth International Conference on

Date 20-22 Aug. 2008

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Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 48
  • [Front cover]

    Page(s): C1
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  • [Title page i]

    Page(s): i
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  • [Title page iii]

    Page(s): iii
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  • [Copyright notice]

    Page(s): iv
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  • Table of contents

    Page(s): v - viii
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  • Message from Conference Chairs

    Page(s): ix
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  • Message from Program Chairs

    Page(s): x
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  • Conference Organizing Committee

    Page(s): xi
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  • International Program Committee

    Page(s): xii - xiii
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  • Keynote Address One

    Page(s): xiv - xvi
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    Provides an abstract for each of the keynote presentations and a brief professional biography of each presenter. The complete presentations were not made available for publication as part of the conference proceedings. View full abstract»

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  • Keynote Address Two

    Page(s): xvii - xviii
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (295 KB)  

    Provides an abstract for each of the keynote presentations and a brief professional biography of each presenter. The complete presentations were not made available for publication as part of the conference proceedings. View full abstract»

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  • Measuring the Social Ability of Software Agents

    Page(s): 3 - 10
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (270 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    To evaluate the global quality of a software agent it is necessary to define appropriate quality characteristics and to determine a set of measures for these features. A comprehensive set of measures has not yet been developed for agent-oriented software. However, some software measures have been adopted from other software paradigms, especially from the object-oriented paradigm because they have features in common. A key characteristic defining a software agent is its social ability, that is, its ability to interact with other agents to achieve its goals. This paper presents a first approximation to a set of measures for evaluating the social ability of software agents for use in the calculation of a global value for this characteristic. View full abstract»

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  • Message Streaming Network Components Architecture and In-Network Programming Model

    Page(s): 11 - 18
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (284 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Many network devices implement capabilities to manipulate traffic depending on the application. Examples include a firewall or a load balancer. These are based on Layer 2-4 packet-based classifications such as port or protocol, or signature recognition. Although configurable or extensible via scripting, they are not generally programmable. We present an architecture extending classification to programmable, semantic Layer 5-7 capabilities. The architecture has programmable handling of that classified traffic, which are message flows, not packets. This has led us to a new, in-network message streaming based programming model. Finally, we present a series of network platform capabilities delivered as components, from precision timing to programmable QoS to network identity. View full abstract»

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  • Automated Deployment of Distributed Software Components with Fault Tolerance Guarantees

    Page(s): 21 - 27
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (224 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this paper, an MILP-based methodology is presented that allows to optimize the deployment of a set of software components over a set of computing resources, with respect to fault tolerance and response times. The MILP model takes into account the reliability and performance parameters of hardware nodes and links, and optimizes a (configurable) trade-off between reliability and performance by replicating software components where necessary and finding an optimal deployment for them. The complete system can be modeled using UML component diagrams and activity diagrams, and an algorithm is presented to transform the UML model to the MILP model. The resulting deployment can then be fed back into the UML model. The applicability of the approach is demonstrated through a case study. View full abstract»

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  • A Study on Design for Testability in Component-Based Embedded Software

    Page(s): 31 - 38
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (276 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Effective implementation of test automation requires taking testing into account in the system design. In short, this is called design for testability (DFT). In this paper a study on DFT in component-based embedded software is presented, based on the interviews and technical documentation from two large-scale companies in the European telecom industry. The way test automation is addressed and the different techniques applied to make this more effective at the architectural level are described. The differences and benefits of different approaches are discussed. View full abstract»

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  • An Analysis of Missed Structure Field Handling Bugs

    Page(s): 41 - 48
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (188 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Despite the importance and prevalence of structures (or records) in programming, no study till now has deeply analyzed the bugs made in their usage. This paper makes a first step to fill that gap by systematically and deeply analyzing a subset of structure usage bugs. The subset, referred to as MSFH bugs, are errors of omission associated with structure fields when they are handled in a grouped context. We analyze the nature of these bugs by providing a taxonomy, root cause analysis, and barrier analysis. The analysis provided many new insights, which suggested new solutions for preventing and detecting the MSFH bugs. View full abstract»

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  • Modeling and Validation of Executable Requirements Using Live Activity Diagrams

    Page(s): 51 - 58
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (317 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A seamless model-based methodology for requirements specification becomes increasingly the key to successful software systems engineering. The enhanced activity diagrams of UML 2 offer a promising intuitive modeling approach for requirements capturing. On this basis, we propose a formal syntax and operational semantics and extend activity diagrams to LADs (Live Activity Diagrams) by liveness-enriched constructs inspired by LSCs (Live Sequence Charts) for stating precise execution modalities. We aim at a tool-supported execution of LAD specifications allowing for early simulation and validation of requirements. We present an implementation of an LAD execution engine and describe the there upon suggested requirements engineering approach by means of an automotive case study. View full abstract»

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  • On Model-Driven Development of Mobile Business Processes

    Page(s): 59 - 66
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (467 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Web services are becoming an integral part of service and workflow systems even within mobile devices. A mobile business process is a special case of a business process where most of the human interaction is performed using mobile devices. Mobile business processes should be adaptable to different mobile devices and to support user interaction with different client applications. Requirements coming from mobility of devices addresses new challenges and interaction models to business process modeling and development. A proper tool support for process development is needed. Furthermore, while mobile business processes emphasize user interaction, a development process should support also creation of user interfaces based on process descriptions. In this paper, we identify characteristics of mobile business processes and propose a model-driven development (MDD) approach, which allows customization of user interfaces. View full abstract»

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  • Parallel Implementation of DPCM Decoding for SMP Systems

    Page(s): 69 - 74
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (177 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    DPCM (differential pulse code modulation) coding is widely used in many applications including lossless JPEG compression. DPCM decoding is inherently a 1-indexed or 2-indexed recurrence relation. Thus, although it is hard to parallelize efficiently, some (N log N)or (log2 N) algorithms have been studied for an N times N image with N times N or N processors. Recently commodity microprocessors are equipped with plural cores and SMP architectures are utilized in some PCs, but the number of parallelism is not so large (up to 80). Thus, it is unrealistic that the image processing of an N times N image is parallelized with N times N or N processors. In this paper, we implements two parallel DPCM algorithms for an N times N image on P processors (P << N): Fat-pipeline and P-scheme. Our experimental results show that both approaches provide the parallelisms of about 3.2 with 6 processing cores. View full abstract»

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  • Compliance of CMMI Process Area  with Specification Based Development

    Page(s): 77 - 84
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (192 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The development of reliable systems is still a major challenge for software industry. Construction of such a system requires both process and product based quality assurance. Many process improvement models have been suggested in industry and found appropriate for achieving high quality products. Examples of such process improvement models are CMM/CMMI, Agile, SPICE, the ISO 9000 family etc. However, implementation of these process improvement models often adds significant extra efforts. To minimize process implementation costs we propose a formal specification based product development model which integrates product and process quality. Formal specification methods have been in practice since decades, and have been successful in the development of safety-critical systems. Some formal methods are VDM, Z, LOTOS, CSP and CASL. In particular, we investigate the compliance of CMMI process area with the formal specification language CSP-CASL. CMMI is based on the notion of process area, which is a cluster of best practices with particular goals in a certain area. For each of the relevant process areas, we show how formal specifications can contribute to achieve the specific goals of that process area. This integration is a new result for achieving process compliance parallel with product development. We demonstrate our approach with an industrial case study. View full abstract»

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  • The Use of Object Orientation to Define Process Models

    Page(s): 85 - 92
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (281 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Software development processes are distinct and not standardized because software users have distinct interests and software companies differ in culture, business and technical procedures, and quality parameters. This scenario exposes the need to define process models to be used as standard but that can be tailored according to project and software company characteristics. In the proposal of this paper, a set of process models defined based on object orientation is proposed as a solution to this problem. The set of these models is grouped in views and is named process architecture. Induction by analogy with software architecture was used as a method to conceive and to structure the process architecture. View full abstract»

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  • Towards Formalization and Verification of Unified Business Process Model Based on Pi Calculus

    Page(s): 93 - 101
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (512 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Nowadays, workflow modeling and analysis has become the focus of study with growing demands on business process management (BPM). In this paper, after defining basic elements (task, user, resource and constraint) of business process, then we propose a formal modeling method of unified business process based on the process algebra language-Pi calculus, integrating tasks, users and resources. Besides modeling control flow, interactional behavior of tasks, users and resources, such as task execution and resource access, can be emphasized so that the unified formal model can satisfy actual running requirements. Also, analysis and verification method of model correctness based on process deduction rule of pi calculus is provided. Next, we establish the Pi calculus model to a concrete business process instance using the modeling approach we propose above. The work reported in this paper provides a theoretical foundation and formal method for modeling and analysis of unified business process. View full abstract»

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  • Adaptation of Refactoring Strategies to Multiple Axes of Modularity: Characteristics and Criteria

    Page(s): 105 - 114
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (200 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In object-oriented programming, the adoption of modules as mixins provides a second axis of modularity. Furthermore, support for aspect-oriented programming introduces a third such axis. In this paper we define criteria under which a feature should be placed in a given unit of modularity and investigate the degree to which the presence of multiple dimensions of modularity affects existing refactoring strategies. We reason about the dilemmas involved and we provide guidelines for applying existing refactoring strategies in order to support the above criteria. We adopt Ruby and Aquarium as example technologies in order to provide an environment with classes, modules and aspects. View full abstract»

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  • A Comparative Review of Processes for Research Development on Applied Computing

    Page(s): 117 - 124
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (577 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The increasing volume of research projects on applied computing is a motivation for analyzing processes which are used to develop such projects. There are significative differences between research projects on applied computing and industrial software projects, for example, in research domain there is the interest in prototype development instead of product development. As a consequence,definition of specific processes to attend this context is required. Additionally, these processes are relevant because, with the wide spread of the Internet, many researchers are working on collaborative projects from geographically distant areas and an adjusted process can help management overtime of artifacts like models, prototypes, and scientific documents. In this paper, the goal is to provide a comparative review of processes for research development on applied computing, based on requirements described in the literature. He hope that results of this review be useful to help researchers to select one approach or defining their own process. View full abstract»

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  • A Theoretical Agile Process Framework for Web Applications Development in Small Software Firms

    Page(s): 125 - 132
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (435 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    As Web based-applications become increasingly important to all aspects of life, there is a need to encourage practitioners to adopt best practices so as to improve the quality of the processes in use, and therefore achieve targets related to time, budget and quality. The Web development industry worldwide is dominated by a myriad of small firms. This presents a challenge in terms of determining the current practices of industry participants, and in devising improvement initiatives which are feasible for small firms. The objectives of this research is to propose a software process model framework that assists the small firms in designing Web based-applications so as not to run over budget and time. To achieve these objectives, an extensive literature survey of Web development methodologies and software process improvement in small firms were conducted to identify Web engineering practice in Web development. The literature survey clarified that, there were several development methodologies of Web-based application. These studies have not taken into consideration software process improvements. A software process framework for Internet development in small firms is proposed in this research .This framework contains several steps to follow; the first step is to begin with small Web project. The second steps is adopt the modified XP process model which is also a suggested process model for Internet development in small firms, and then apply XXPM as a quality model for software process improvement. If the proposed software process framework is to be successful then it must be laid on Web engineering practices. View full abstract»

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