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Autonomous Mental Development, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 2 • Date June 2013

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Displaying Results 1 - 12 of 12
  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): C1
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  • IEEE Transactions on Autonomous Mental Development publication information

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): C2
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  • Brain-Like Emergent Temporal Processing: Emergent Open States

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 89 - 116
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (3100 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Informed by brain anatomical studies, we present the developmental network (DN) theory on brain-like temporal information processing. The states of the brain are at its effector end, emergent and open. A finite automaton (FA) is considered an external symbolic model of brain's temporal behaviors, but the FA uses handcrafted states and is without “internal” representations. The term &... View full abstract»

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  • A Simple Ontology of Manipulation Actions Based on Hand-Object Relations

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 117 - 134
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (2943 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Humans can perform a multitude of different actions with their hands (manipulations). In spite of this, so far there have been only a few attempts to represent manipulation types trying to understand the underlying principles. Here we first discuss how manipulation actions are structured in space and time. For this we use as temporal anchor points those moments where two objects (or hand and objec... View full abstract»

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  • An Autonomous Social Robot in Fear

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 135 - 151
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1675 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Currently artificial emotions are being extensively used in robots. Most of these implementations are employed to display affective states. Nevertheless, their use to drive the robot's behavior is not so common. This is the approach followed by the authors in this work. In this research, emotions are not treated in general but individually. Several emotions have been implemented in a real robot, b... View full abstract»

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  • Adaptability of Tacit Learning in Bipedal Locomotion

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 152 - 161
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1978 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The capability of adapting to unknown environmental situations is one of the most salient features of biological regulations. This capability is ascribed to the learning mechanisms of biological regulatory systems that are totally different from the current artificial machine-learning paradigm. We consider that all computations in biological regulatory systems result from the spatial and temporal ... View full abstract»

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  • Reaching for the Unreachable: Reorganization of Reaching with Walking

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 162 - 172
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1121 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Previous research suggests that reaching and walking behaviors may be linked developmentally as reaching changes at the onset of walking. Here we report new evidence on an apparent loss of the distinction between the reachable and nonreachable distances as children start walking. The experiment compared nonwalkers, walkers with help, and independent walkers in a reaching task to targets at varying... View full abstract»

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  • Redundant Neural Vision Systems—Competing for Collision Recognition Roles

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 173 - 186
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (3330 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Ability to detect collisions is vital for future robots that interact with humans in complex visual environments. Lobula giant movement detectors (LGMD) and directional selective neurons (DSNs) are two types of identified neurons found in the visual pathways of insects such as locusts. Recent modeling studies showed that the LGMD or grouped DSNs could each be tuned for collision recognition. In bo... View full abstract»

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  • Open Access

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 187
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  • IEEE Xplore Digital Library

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 188
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  • IEEE Computational Intelligence Society Information

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): C3
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  • IEEE Transactions on Autonomous Mental Development information for authors

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): C4
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Aims & Scope

IEEE Transactions on Autonomous Mental Development (TAMD) includes computational modeling of mental development, including mental architecture, theories, algorithms, properties, and experiments.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Angelo Cangelosi
Plymouth University