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3DTV Conference: The True Vision - Capture, Transmission and Display of 3D Video, 2008

Date 28-30 May 2008

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  • [Front cover]

    Page(s): C1
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  • [Breaker page]

    Page(s): 1
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  • [Breaker page]

    Page(s): 1
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  • Preface

    Page(s): i - ii
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  • Table of contents

    Page(s): iii - xv
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  • Staff or Society listings

    Page(s): xvi - xviii
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  • list-reviewer

    Page(s): xix - xx
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  • [Commentary]

    Page(s): xxi
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  • [Breaker page]

    Page(s): xxii
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  • [Breaker page]

    Page(s): 1
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  • [Breaker page]

    Page(s): 2
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  • Three Dimensional Sensing, Visualization, and Display

    Page(s): 3 - 4
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    This keynote address will present an overview of recent advances in Three-dimensional (3D) sensing, imaging and display. We shall discuss both passive sensing integral imaging and active sensing computational holographic imaging for 3D visualization, display, and image recognition. Mathematical analysis, computer simulations, and optical experimental results will be presented. There are numerous applications of these technologies including medical 3D imaging, 3D visualization, 3D identification and inspection, 3D television, 3D video, 3D multimedia, interactive communication, education, entertainment, and commerce. View full abstract»

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  • 3D Modeling of Real-world Objects, Scenes and Events from Videos

    Page(s): 5 - 6
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    In this talk I will present an overview of several techniques developed in my group for recovering 3D shape, motion and appearance from images. We will start by discussing how to recover photo-realistic 3D models of static objects or scenes from videos. Besides static scenes, we also aim to model dynamic events. While we will show that it is possible to recover dynamic shape from a single video stream, the simplest way to recover dynamic shapes consists of using multiple cameras. Our approach allows for camera calibration and synchronization to be obtained from videos recorded during normal operation. Our silhouette-based technique recovers the 3D shape of multiple dynamic objects as well as of static occluding objects in the environment. Towards the future, one of our main research goals is to develop approaches for capturing immersive 4D spatio-temporal representation of dynamic events taking place in large-scale environments. View full abstract»

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  • 3D in the Home: Mass Market or Niche?

    Page(s): 7 - 8
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  • [Breaker page]

    Page(s): 9
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  • [Breaker page]

    Page(s): 10
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  • Compression of 3D Meshes - Applications, Approaches, Standards

    Page(s): 11 - 14
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    3D triangle meshes are a common form for representing the geometry of static and dynamic 3D objects. They are employed already in many areas, e.g. e-commerce, video games, online museums, CGI or 3D animated films, etc. Static triangle meshes represent only a piecewise linear approximation of complex 3D objects. As a consequence the approximation error can be unacceptably high unless the number of triangles is sufficiently large. On the other hand a large number of triangles makes these meshes cumbersome to handle and expensive to store or to transmit. Consequently, there exists a demand for techniques for efficient compression of static and dynamic 3D meshes. In this article we start with basics on 3D meshes. Thereafter, we explain the key ideas behind different mesh compression approaches for static and dynamic 3D meshes, and highlight their similarities and differences. Finally, we introduce the upcoming MPEG standard for compression of dynamic 3D meshes, which is referred to as FAMC (Frame-based Animated Mesh Compression), and show comparative compression results. View full abstract»

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  • Challenges to 3D Realistic Broadcasting System

    Page(s): 15 - 16
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    Summary form only given.Realistic broadcasting is considered as the next generation broadcasting service supporting user-friendly interactions. In this talk, we define multi-modal immersive media and introduce technologies for the realistic broadcasting system, which has been developed at Realistic Broadcasting Research Center (RBRC) in Korea. In order to generate three-dimensional (3-D) scenes, we acquire immersive media using a depth- based camera and/or multi-view camera systems. After converting the immersive media into broadcasting contents, we send the immersive multimedia contents to the clients using high-speed and high-capacity transmission techniques. Finally, we can experience realistic feelings from the 3-D display, 3-D sound, and haptic interaction. With the realistic broadcasting system, we can generate new paradigms for the next generation digital broadcasting. View full abstract»

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  • Computer-Generated Holograms and 3-D Visual Communication

    Page(s): 17 - 18
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    Summary form only given. 3D visual communication is one of the most topical issues in the development of the modern information society. There are no doubts that the ultimate solution for 3-D visualization is holographic imaging. This is the only method that is capable of reproducing, in the most natural viewing conditions, 3-D images that have all visual properties of the original objects including full parallax, and are visually separated from the display device. 3-D visual communication and display can be achieved through generating, at the viewer side, of holograms out of data that contain all relevant information regarding the scene to be viewed. Digital computers are ideal means for converting data on 3-D scenes into optical holograms for visual perception. Basic ideas of using computer generated holograms for 3D visualization date back to 1960-th .1970-th. However, at that time there was no an appropriate technological base for the implementation of these ideas. Recent advances in computer engineering, electro optics and nano-photonics allow making a decisive breakthrough in this respect. The goal of the tutorial is to assist new generation of researches in the adaptation of these ideas to the new emerging technical means and their implementation in 3D displays, 3D television and 3D video communication. It covers all main relevant issues, from basics of holography to principles of synthesis and encoding of computer generated holograms and methods of 3D visualization using computer generated holograms. View full abstract»

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  • [Breaker page]

    Page(s): 19
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  • [Breaker page]

    Page(s): 20
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  • Scanning Led Array Based Volumetric Display

    Page(s): 21 - 24
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (302 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A novel quasi-holographic display concept is developed using light emitting diode (LED) arrays on scanning platform. The display system is capable of providing smooth motion parallax and solving the accommodation-vergence rivalry. Each scanner module contains 1D LED array mounted on a polymer scanner with a lens for imaging the LEDs onto a special diffuser screen. The scanning modules are actuated electromagnetically and the LEDs are driven with an external LED driving field programmable gate array (FPGA) circuitry designed for the purpose. The scanners have a natural frequency of 12.7 Hz, scan line of 21.5deg total optical scan angle (TOSA) and a quality factor of 20. The three dimensional (3D) display concept is proved with two of these modules by displaying two points sequentially at two different depths. View full abstract»

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  • Novel Depth-Fused Display (DFD) System With Wide Viewing 3D Images

    Page(s): 25 - 28
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    Viewing angle caused by images shift is the most serious issue for depth-fused display (DFD). A wide viewing angle 3D-DFD system utilized high collimated backlight with wide viewing angle micro-lens array was proposed to avoid the images shift. From the experiment results, the viewing angle was demonstrated to be increased to thetas =plusmn30deg~plusmn40deg, which is much wider than that of conventional DFD (thetas<plusmn10deg). Consequently, the proposed 3D-DFD system will be glasses-less, fatigue-less, and wide viewing. View full abstract»

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  • Design and Implementation of a DMD Based Volumetric 3D Display

    Page(s): 29 - 32
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    A real image swept-volume volumetric display is developed. A piston type moving screen is used to obtain the desired volume. A commercially available DMD device is used to project 2D slices of a 3D frame. There is a varying magnification effect during the projection because of the optical design of the system; raw 3D video frames are processed by a software to generate the appropriate 2D slices by also correcting the magnification. Synchronization between the hardware and the software is achieved via a microcontroller. The overall system is capable of printing 12 3D frames per second where a 3D frame consists of 90 2D slices with a resolution varying from 512times512 to 450times450 (approx. 20M voxels per one 3D frame). Although some flickering effect is observed due to rather low 3D frame rate, results are visually satisfactory. View full abstract»

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  • Implementation of Stereoscopic and Dualview Images on a Micro-Display High Definition Television

    Page(s): 33 - 36
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    Cutting edge Micro-display High Definition Televisions have the capability to display high resolution images at high update rates. The next capability on the horizon to enhance the viewing experience of High Definition Televisions is the ability to display stereoscopic images and video content. This paper discusses the implementation of a Micro-Display High Definition Television, capable of displaying stereoscopic images and video content with the aid of high contrast shutter glasses. It also introduces another new feature called DualView. View full abstract»

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