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Composition-Based Software Systems, 2008. ICCBSS 2008. Seventh International Conference on

Date 25-29 Feb. 2008

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  • [Front cover]

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  • [Title page i]

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  • [Title page iii]

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  • [Copyright notice]

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  • Table of contents

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  • Foreword

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  • Message from the Program Chairs

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  • Planning Committee

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  • Program Committee

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  • Diagnosis and Prognosis of Interoperability Challenges

    Page(s): 4
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    As systems have grown larger and more complex into systems of systems, the community has learned much about what works and what doesn't when designing for interoperability. These lessons learned can help in identifying and predicting problems early in the development lifecycle. This workshop will bring together practitioners who have insights into addressing systems of systems interoperability. The session will focus on diagnosing interoperability issues within software systems; prognosticating interoperability challenges given a proposed system design or architecture; and the resulting impact on the system of systems design. The key questions to be addressed by the workshop are: “how can system interoperability issues be identified and addressed as early as possible; and how can this be confirmed?” Positions are invited from industry and academia that look at interoperability from the following perspectives: quantifiable requirements, architecture, design practices, analysis, testing, and lessons learned from successes and failures. Insights from traditional software systems and non-traditional environments that apply to system of systems development are particularly welcome. The proposed format is a 6 hour workshop comprised of 4-5 20 minute position papers combined with a healthy discussion component. The workshop seeks to leverage insights and identify proposed areas for further development and research. View full abstract»

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  • Tutorial 1: Modeling Key Dynamics in Complex Systems (of Systems) Environments: Foundational Concepts

    Page(s): 7
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (149 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The transition from systems that provide a pre-defined product to ongoing relationships that focus on supporting dynamically changing customer needs over time is moving suppliers from a product-delivery mode to one in which through-life capability management is expected. Appropriately modeling both supply and demand provides participants in this context with a richer understanding of risks and risk mitigations associated with their delivery strategy. This tutorial presents foundational concepts for modeling approaches along with a number of modeling techniques that address different aspects of customer-supplier relationships in dynamic environments. View full abstract»

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  • Tutorial 2: The Method Framework for Engineering System Architectures (MFESA): A Practical Way to Generate Effective and Efficient Project-Specific System Architecture Engineering Methods

    Page(s): 8 - 10
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    This 1/2 day tutorial presents a new proposed method framework and associated repository of reusable method components for creating appropriate project-specific methods for engineering system architectures. Several MFESA tasks directly involve component-based software-intensive systems in that they involve the identification and analysis of potential reusable architectural work products including patterns, models, and architectural components. View full abstract»

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  • Tutorial 3: Engineering Systems of Systems

    Page(s): 11
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    Over the past decade, the complexity of new and acquired systems of systems has increased dramatically. Until now, research has mainly focused on the properties of systems of systems. Recently, paradigms such as service oriented  architecture (SOA) and Grid computing are being adopted to implement systems of systems. Additionally, techniques such as SoS Navigator are being developed to identify complexrelationships among organizations participating insuch systems of systems. However, there is no unifiedbody of knowledge that captures the engineeringpractices necessary for creating and managing systemsof systems. Further research is required to build this body of knowledge, but two main challenges must be addressed. View full abstract»

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  • Tutorial 4: Adopting SOA

    Page(s): 12
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (153 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This half-day tutorial provides an unbiased, comprehensive and vendor independent overview of the potential benefits and risks implied when embarking on a SOA strategy. Course participants will gain knowledge and a clear understanding of the concept of Service-oriented Architectures (SOA), covering the entire SOA lifecycle, from conception through planning, development and deployment to maintenance. View full abstract»

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  • Designing for Recovery: New Challenges for Large-Scale Complex IT Systems

    Page(s): 15
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    Summary form only given. Since the 1980s, the object of design for dependability has been to avoid, detect or tolerate system faults so that these do not result in failures that are detectable outside the system. Whilst this is potentially achievable in medium size systems that are controlled by a single organisations, it is now practically impossible to achieve in large-scale systems of systems where different parts of the system are owned and controlled by different organisations. Therefore, we must accept the inevitability of failure and re-orient our system design strategies to recover from those failures at minimal cost and as quickly as possible. This talk will discuss why such recovery strategies cannot be purely technical but must be socio-technical in nature and argue that design for recovery will require a better understanding of how people recover from failure and the information they need during that recovery process. I will argue that supporting recovery should be a fundamental design objective of systems and explore what this means for current approaches to large-scale systems design. View full abstract»

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  • Practical Approaches to Delivering Service-Oriented Solutions: The Role of Software Architects and Architecture in an SOA World

    Page(s): 16
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    Summary form only given. A key challenge in software engineering is the design and realization of complex software- intensive systems from assemblies of parts and pieces. Creating successful component-based software solutions depends on there being a close connection between the key business objectives, and the flexible IT technical services that enable this. Current software development patterns and practices have evolved to help create the flexible architectures required to achieve the goals of component-based approaches. With the increasing focus on service-oriented architectures (SOA), we must revisit some of the key architectural concerns for SOA, and enhance the methods, tools, and best practices at the heart of successful service-oriented solutions. The focus of this presentation will be on changing practices for component-based development with SOA, and methods for modeling of service-oriented solutions in support of a broader approach to the analysis, design, construction, and governance of such solutions. View full abstract»

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  • Interoperability to Drive Open Innovation of Enterprises

    Page(s): 17 - 18
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    This presentation will discuss interoperability and, specifically, Enterprise Interoperability from a broad European perspective. It will summarise the achievements of the enterprise interoperability cluster to date, and its plans for the future. It will introduce the research direction of the new FP7 projects that belong to the cluster. In addition, the presentation will outline the R&D paths that the commission wish to explore in the field of enterprise interoperability for the next FP7 ICT Work Programme 2009-2010. The presentation will conclude with critical issues pertaining to advancing interoperability for enterprises in a period of profound market and structural change, unleashed by new ideas and processes of innovation, and in anticipation of Future Internet enterprise systems, services and communication networks. View full abstract»

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  • Supporting Runtime System Adaptation through Product Line Engineering and Plug-in Techniques

    Page(s): 21 - 30
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (521 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Product line engineering and plug-in techniques pursue different but complementary goals. Software product line engineering strives for modeling the variability of software systems on different levels of abstraction, whereas plug-in systems support software extensibility, customizability, and evolution. We present an approach demonstrating the benefits of integrating those two areas and discuss the integration of a plug-in platform for enterprise software with an existing product line engineering tool suite. The plug-in platform provides extensibility as well as runtime reconfiguration and adaptation mechanisms on the .NET platform. Automatic runtime adaptations are attained by using the knowledge documented in variability models. We discuss several usage scenarios developed in cooperation with our industry partner illustrating the need of our approach in the enterprise software domain. Finally, we validate the approach on a commercial ERP system of our industry partner. View full abstract»

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  • A Methodology for Dynamic Service Composition

    Page(s): 33 - 42
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    Much work has been done in the area of Service- centric Software Engineering and Service oriented Architectures (SOA). However, comprehensive guidance on how to compose dynamic and context- aware services in order to be able to self-adapt and self-configure at run-time is rarely given. This paper provides such guidance in the form of an ISO/IEC 24744-based methodology, which includes the work that is expected to be performed (by people and by machines), the products to be involved, and the agents that participate. By using this methodology, Service- centric Software Engineering approaches can come closer to delivering tangible results. View full abstract»

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  • Composing Multi-view Aspect Models

    Page(s): 43 - 52
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    Large models for complex systems can be decomposed in separate pieces corresponding to different perspectives on the system. This decomposition allows the modeller to check properties locally on some aspects of the system before considering the global complexity of the model. In this paper we consider two types of decomposition: according to the concerns identified in the requirements and according to structural and behavioural perspectives. Once the separate models are available and have been checked separately, they have to be composed to check global properties. In this work, we propose automatic composition operators for symmetric and asymmetric concern models, each concern being modelled from a structural and behavioural point of view. View full abstract»

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  • Evolving and Composing Frameworks with Aspects: The MobiGrid Case

    Page(s): 53 - 62
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (317 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Software frameworks enable modular, large-scale reuse by both providing a core architecture addressing recurring concerns in a certain domain and a set of variability options. However, the high volatility of requirements nowadays often imposes a number of framework changes with an architecture-wide impact. In order to avoid the framework design erosion, the modularity and stability of its core architecture implementation must be preserved. With aspect-oriented programming (AOP) promising superior software evolvability, there is a need for verifying its efficacy to enhance or not framework architecture stability. This paper presents a systematic case study where we have compared the evolution of 00 and aspectual versions of a code mobility framework, called MobiGrid. Our analysis was driven by the application of heterogeneous evolutionary changes to MobiGrid, such as feature extensions and compositions with a second framework. Our analysis is also rooted at a comprehensive suite of conventional quantitative stability and modularity indicators. View full abstract»

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  • Experience Report on the Construction of Quality Models for Some Content Management Software Domains

    Page(s): 63 - 71
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    In previous work, we proposed the use of software quality models for driving the formulation of requirements in the context of software package selection. Now, we report two related projects of construction of software quality models in the domains of document management, entreprise content management and Web content management. These domains may be considered particular cases of a more general category sometimes labeled as content management. The goals of these projects are several. First, to assess the scalability of our methods and artifacts. Second, to investigate the degree of reusability when working on domains so closely related. Third, in relation to the previous one, to gain more knowledge of the adequacy and effectiveness of our notion of software domains taxonomy. Fourth, to evaluate the suitability and usability of our DesCOTS system proposed as tool-support for these activities. View full abstract»

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  • Domain Implementation in Software Product Lines Using OSGi

    Page(s): 72 - 81
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    Software product lines (SPL) are a powerful way of ensuring quality, economic efficiency, and manageability of software system families. In SPL, a key aspect is the domain implementation, whose goal is to provide the implementation of reusable assets (components). However, current approaches present some gaps in this direction, such as the lack of definition on how to implement and document software components in a systematic way. In this context, this paper presents a method for domain implementation in software product lines. The method is based on a well defined set of guidelines, inputs, outputs, and roles, and uses OSGi as the main implementation technology. An experimental study evaluates the viability of the use of the method and the impact of applying it to a software development project. View full abstract»

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  • Benchmarking the Customer Configuration Updating Practices of Product Software Vendors

    Page(s): 82 - 91
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (198 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Product software vendors do not invest enough effort on release, delivery, deployment, and usage and activation of their software products. Not spending effort on these customer configuration updating processes leads to high overhead per customer, which impedes growth in customer numbers. This paper presents the results of a survey that provides product software vendors with an overview of their customer configuration updating processes and practices, and benchmarks theirs against competitors using similar technology, of the same size, and active in the same market. These benchmarks contain customized advice to the respondent company that can be used to strategically improve customer configuration updating processes to gain efficiency and effectiveness. The survey was held in the Netherlands, and 74 software vendors responded. Amongst other conclusions, a significant positive correlation was found between success of a software product and a vendor's recent investments into customer configuration updating. View full abstract»

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