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Advances in Sensors and Interface, 2007. IWASI 2007. 2nd International Workshop on

Date 26-27 June 2007

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Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 56
  • [Front cover]

    Page(s): c1
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  • [Title page]

    Page(s): i
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  • Sponsored by

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  • Proceedings

    Page(s): iii
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    First Page of the Article
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  • Copyright

    Page(s): iv
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  • Table of contents

    Page(s): v - vii
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  • Foreword

    Page(s): viii
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  • Organizing Committee

    Page(s): ix
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  • Ultra-low power biopotential interfaces and their application in wearable and implantable systems

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    With the advent of ultra-low power sensor interfaces, long-term ambulatory monitoring using wearable devices and more energy-autonomous implants are becoming a reality. This paper will present suitable architectures and circuits, and will present several application case examples. View full abstract»

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  • CMOS chips for bio molecule sensing purposes

    Page(s): 1 - 6
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    A topical review is given concerning CMOS-based DNA microarrays. Considering the entire application chain, functionalization techniques, required CMOS process extensions and consequences, and a number of readout techniques are discussed. Related circuit design issues and CMOS implementations are highlighted as well. View full abstract»

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  • Molecular electronic circuits

    Page(s): 1
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    This talk focuses on pathways to solving the challenges involved in adapting molecular switches so that they can be used in practical circuits. Addressing these issues result in detailed understanding of the interactions between molecular switch properties and application requirements, deep consideration of interconnect structures, and modeling of potential candidate structures. This talk is part tutorial and part research talk. The tutorial portion will discuss fundamental circuit issues, including CMOS scaling concerns, and competing approaches to nanoelectronics. The research talk will start with a treatment of the appropriateness of Spice as a circuit modeler before presenting our results in memory and logic applications. View full abstract»

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  • Selective quenching of unhybridized fluorescent probes by gold nanoparticles for rapid SNP genotyping using conventional PCR

    Page(s): 1 - 5
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    We detect single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in genomic DNA that has been amplified using a standard PCR protocol where a short fluorescently tagged probe sequence and a single denaturation and annealing step have been added. We utilize the ability of ionically treated gold nanoparticles to selectively adsorb unhybridized probes in the modified PCR product and quench their fluorescence. The method eliminates the time and expense of gel electrophoresis while retaining the ability to use an ordinary thermal cycler for PCR amplification. We describe an application to genotyping Fatty Zucker rats and validate the method against fluorogenic realtime PCR with double blind studies. View full abstract»

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  • Smart sensors for fast biological analysis

    Page(s): 1 - 5
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    This paper presents an updated overview of present works concerning the realization of biological sensors based on electronic devices. In particular DNA sensors will be described and their main characteristics will be analyzed. As an example, a new sensor for DNA detection and analysis will be described in details. The proposed approach is based on the use of non-volatile memories and does not require sample treatment nor sensor surface functionalization. Moreover fabrication technology is widely compatible with standard CMOS process. Experimental results show that the sensor has sufficient accuracy and sensitivity, that can be further improved by suitable device engineering. View full abstract»

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  • Chemical design, synthesis and thin film supramolecular architecture for advanced performance chemo- and bio-sensing organic field effect transistors

    Page(s): 1 - 2
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    Organic thin film transistor (OTFT) sensors are capable of fast, sensitive and reliable detection of various classes of chemical and biological analytes with high selectivity, and display the additional advantage of being compatible with plastic electronic technologies. Their distinctive versatility is based on multilevel control of the properties, from molecular design up to device architecture. Here Phenylene-thiophene based semiconductors functionalized with bio-molecules have been synthesized to be used as active layers in sensing OTFTs. These materials, indeed, combine the recognition capability of bio-molecules with the electronic properties of the conjugated backbone. The resulting OTFTs have been used to perform chemical recognition of citronellol obtaining detection limit in the ppm range. View full abstract»

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  • A new integrated kinematic sensor for the classification of sit-to-stand locomotion task

    Page(s): 1 - 5
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    In this paper we introduce a new kinematic sensor to evaluate the ability to rise from a chair by means of the sit-to-stand locomotion task. It is based on the analysis of the acceleration assessed by a homemade accelerometric transducer. Preliminary results show the feasibility of discriminating the rising from a chair fixed to different heights and the capability of distinguishing between pathological and non pathological parkinsonian subjects. View full abstract»

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  • Gold nanoparticle sensors for environmental pollutant monitoring

    Page(s): 1 - 4
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    Gold nanoparticles (Au-NPs) have been synthesised using a sacrificial anode electrolysis in the presence of tetra-alkyl-ammonium halides, employed as cationic stabilizers. Catalytic NPs have been then deposited on top of Field Effect (FE) gas sensing devices and subjected to mild annealing procedures. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) shows that the NP average core diameter is around 5 nm. X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) have been applied to the surface characterization of the annealed NP films used as active sensing layers. Morphological and spectroscopic results demonstrate that the annealed inorganic nano-clusters are finely dispersed and maintain a metallic oxidation state. Au-NPs can be proficiently employed as gate material in Si-Field Effect Gas Sensors. Preliminary results show interesting selectivity and sensitivity sensing features towards NOx detection. View full abstract»

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  • A two electrode C - NiO Nafion® amperometric sensor for NO2 detection

    Page(s): 1 - 5
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    In this paper the authors propose a new and simple Nafionreg based amperometric sensor and a dedicated measurement system and measurement protocol. The system has a linear response to NO2 concentration and a sensitivity up to 90 nA/ppm. Moreover, the developed sensor shows a satisfactory repeatability and a low cross-sensitivity to some common interfering gases (such as CO and oxygen). View full abstract»

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  • Chromatographic system based on amorphous silicon photodiodes

    Page(s): 1 - 4
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    In this work, we present a novel thin layer chromatography system based on fluorescence detection by means of a linear array of amorphous silicon photodiodes. The photodiodes are optically coupled to a thin layer chromatography plate to monitor, in real-time, the separation of the components of a mixture during the chromatographic run. We designed a horizontal development chamber with UV transparent window and integrated eluent tank. The resulting system is extremely compact and ensures fast analysis using only small amounts of eluent. With our system, we analyzed different mixtures of fluorescent inks and other molecules such as fluorescein. Real-time data of sensors located in different position are used to detect the composition of the mixture. The various components can be determined from the time of the transit of the different species in front of the sensors. Furthermore, from the measured data it is possible to extract additional information as the transport properties of the stationary phase or the velocity profile along the run for each component of the mixture. View full abstract»

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  • A readout circuit in 0.35μm CMOS technology for Lab-on-a-Chip applications

    Page(s): 1 - 6
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    In this paper an integrated readout circuit for Lab-on-a-Chip applications is described. The system consist of a 320x320 array of capacitor sensors and actuators, the pitch of each site is 20 mum. Sensors detect dielectric permittivity variation thanks to dielectrophoresis (DEP) process. Usually for this kind of applications the analog-to-digital conversion is carried out off chip but the major limitation in this case is the noise floor and then high signal to noise ratios are difficult to obtain. In fact, for these applications the noise floor specification (>10b) is more critical than linearity (~8b). In order to reduce the amount of noise coupled to the signal at the chip pad and on the board, an on-chip analog-to-digital conversion is here implemented. The electronic interface is composed by two main blocks: a pre-amplifier with programmable gain and an algorithmic analog-to-digital converter with a 1.5-bit/stage architecture. Each one is realized by fully differential switched capacitor technique. The proposed A/D converter has 1 lb resolution, a sampling rate of about WOksample/s and an input full-scale range of Wp-p differential. Simulation results show a SNR=65.7 dB and an EN OB value of 10.6b. Readout chain is implemented in 0.35 mum CMOS technology with a 3.3Vsupply voltage. View full abstract»

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  • Modeling and design of a microdisk photonic sensor for biological applications

    Page(s): 1 - 6
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    In this paper, we present the modeling and design of a new approach to detect an analyte for biochemical and biological sensing applications. It is based on a whispering-gallery-mode optical resonator coupled with a Fabry-Perot cavity in silicon-on-insulator technology. The theoretical model of the whole architecture includes the influence of all electrical and optical parameters, such as thin oxide thickness, silicon and poly silicon doping concentration, optical losses, wavelength and amplitude characteristics of the architecture, charge accumulation effects, and thermal effects. The very high sensitivity of this device, demonstrated by simulations, is due to the simultaneous influence of the two coupled resonators and the metal-oxide-semiconductor structure. View full abstract»

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  • A configurable architecture for the detection of DNA sequences based on a E2PROM device

    Page(s): 1 - 6
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    The authors present a novel approach to perform the readout of a genetic sensor using a configurable architecture with extremely low drift with temperature and low sensitivity to the drift of mobile gate oxide charges. The proposed architecture, able to detect small changes of U.V. absorbance, calculates the analog weighted difference between the gate / source voltages of a floating gate and a reference nMOS transistor fabricated using a single poly technology. The theoretical dependence of the obtained results on both device and circuit parameters has carefully been analyzed. Experimental results show that the circuit offers a valid solution to decrease the error due to temperature variation during operation. Moreover, the measurement procedure is sufficiently quick for neglecting threshold voltage shifts due to mobile charges. Finally, the proposed approach has a particular advantage in integrated system design, since it is compatible with high-density MOS logic. View full abstract»

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  • A CMOS Integrated DNA-chip for hybridization detection with digital output

    Page(s): 1 - 5
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    A CMOS integrated circuit hosting an array of 80 sensors for DNA hybridization detection was designed. Each biosensor is made up of a FET device whose current is modulated by DNA electric charge. The chip incorporates integrated temperature detection for precise assay control and features programmable signal conditioning, amplification and A/D conversion. Successful pre-and post-layout simulations are provided. View full abstract»

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  • Design of an integrated low-noise read-out system for DNA capacitive sensors

    Page(s): 1 - 6
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    This paper describes an integrated solution for an accurate DNA label-free detection. The sensor considered is capacitive and constists of two golden electrodes. A known DNA strands (probe) is immobilized over them and a capacitive shift occurs in presence of a complementary sequence inside the solution. The shift amount has been previously evaluated by means of a charge sensitive amplifier (CSA) with an active feedback resistance, followed by a comparator and a counter on a prototyping board. Starting from the measurement results an integrated version is presented here using a low-noise CSA to reduce the low-frequency noise and offset. The system provides an A/D conversion and an evaluation of the capacitive shift amount with a resolution of more than 12 bit. The proposed integrated version of the read-out demonstrates the ability to identify variation on the capacitive values of the sensor with a resolution of 0.1%. View full abstract»

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  • Energy scavenging for wireless sensor nodes

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    Most wireless sensor nodes are powered by primary or secondary (rechargeable) batteries. These take up a large proportion of the size and weight, and often the cost, of the nodes, and furthermore the need to replace or recharge them creates a significant maintenance burden. Maintenance free power provision would greatly increase the feasibility of networks with very large numbers of, or very widely distributed, nodes. Recently the scavenging of energy from the environment, in the form of heat, motion, light or other electromagnetic radiation, has been actively researched as a possible solution to this problem. In this paper the progress and ultimate potential of such power sources is reviewed, with an emphasis on motion and vibration scavenging. The power levels achievable are examined, and applications are considered in which such sources are attractive to substitute for or supplement batteries. View full abstract»

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  • Sensor networks for industrial applications

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    Industrial applications are moving from centralized architectures towards distributed ones, thanks to cost effectiveness, better flexibility, scalability, reliability and diagnostic functionalities. The use of sensors in industrial communications improves overall plant performance since sensor information can be used by several equipments and shared on the Web. A communication system suitable for computers and PLCs, that exchanges a large amount of data with soft real-time constrains, can be hardly adapted to sensors, especially to simple and low-cost ones. In fact, these devices typically require a cyclic, isochronous and hard realtime exchange of few data. For this reason, specific fieldbuses have been widely used to realize industrial sensor networks, while high-level industrial communication systems take advantage of Ethernet/Internet and. more recently, wireless technologies. In these years, Ethernet-based solutions that meet real-time operation requirements, called Real-Time Ethernet, are replacing traditional fieldbuses and research activities in real-time wireless sensor networking are growing. In this paper, following an overview of the state-of-art of real-time sensor networks for industrial applications, problems and possible approaches to solve them are presented, with particular reference to methods and instrumentation for performance measurement. View full abstract»

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