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Grid Computing, 2007 8th IEEE/ACM International Conference on

Date 19-21 Sept. 2007

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  • [Front cover]

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): c1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • [Front inside cover]

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): c2
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  • [Back inside cover]

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): c3
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  • Hub page

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): i
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Session list

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): ii
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  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): iii - viii
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  • Brief author index

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): ix - xii
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  • Detailed author index

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): xiii - xl
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  • The end of indexes

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): xli
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  • General co-chairs’ message

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): xlii
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  • Program Chairs' message

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): xliii
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  • Conference chairs

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): xliv
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  • Program Committee

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): xlv - xlvi
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  • Keynote presenters

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): xlvii
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (112 KB)  

    Provides an abstract for each of the keynote presentations and a brief professional biography of each presenter. The complete presentations were not made available for publication as part of the conference proceedings. View full abstract»

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  • CD support

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): xlviii
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  • [PDF Reader FAQ and support]

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): xlix
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  • [PDF Reader FAQ and support]

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): l
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  • Grid 3.0: Services, semantics and society

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 1
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (119 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The trend in recent years in distributed computing and distributed information systems has been to open up: to expose interfaces and content outside the bounds of the originating application, resource or middleware; to simplify access to third party resources, data and capability; and to actively encourage and support creativity through the reuse and combination of already available components and content, be they ours or others. The ubiquity of the Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) is testament to the driver, in both industry and scientific research, for more agile solutions, more rapid development, more flexibility and more opportunity for effective use of what has gone before. The rise of the web service and its adoption for Grids are examples. In the sciences the web service has become established as the delivery mechanism for publicly available data sets and tools. Designing reusable components and enabling content to be reusable is tough; finding it. and correctly understanding and using it is even tougher, especially when the consumer is not the producer. Another concern is the gap between the infrastructure and resource provider and the application developer and user. Infrastructure has no value other than to enable applications. In the Grid we seem to have done a good job enabling Virtual Organisations of resource providers through virtualisation and provisioning. View full abstract»

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  • Scheduling Δ-Critical Tasks in mixed-parallel applications on a national grid

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 2 - 9
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (239 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Mixed-parallel applications can take advantage of large-scale computing platforms but scheduling them efficiently on such platforms is challenging. When relying on classic list-scheduling algorithms, the issue of independent and selfish task allocation determination may arise. Indeed the allocation of the most critical task may lead to poor allocations for subsequent tasks. In this paper we propose a new mixed-parallel scheduling heuristic that takes into account that several tasks may have almost the same level of criticality during the allocation process. We then perform a comparison of this heuristic with other algorithms in simulation over a wide range of application and on platform conditions. We find that our heuristic achieves better performance in terms of schedule length, speedup and degradation from best. View full abstract»

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  • Multi-objective planning for workflow execution on Grids

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 10 - 17
    Cited by:  Papers (21)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (236 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Utility grids create an infrastructure for enabling users to consume services transparently over a global network. When optimizing workflow execution on utility grids, we need to consider multiple quality of service (QoS) parameters including service prices and execution time. These optimization objectives may be in conflict. In this paper, we have proposed a workflow execution planning approach using multi-objective evolutionary algorithms (MOEAs). Our goal was to generate a set of trade-off scheduling solutions according to the users QoS requirements. The alternative trade-off solutions offer more flexibility to users when estimating their QoS requirements of workflow executions. Simulation results show that MOEAs are able to find a range of compromise solutions in a short computational time. View full abstract»

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  • Scientific workflow scheduling in computational grids — Planning, reservation, and data/network-awareness

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 18 - 25
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (222 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A very important issue in executing a scientific workflow in computational grids is how to map and schedule workflow tasks onto multiple distributed resources and handle task dependencies in a timely manner to deliver users' expected performance. In this paper, we present our work to develop and evaluate an advanced workflow scheduler in computational grid environments, the GRACCE scheduler. The GRACCE scheduler applies advanced scheduling techniques, such as resource negotiation and reservation, data/network-aware scheduling and performance prediction in the resource allocation and execution planning process. To evaluate the scheduler, we have set up an experimental environment that models a computational grid in those aspects relevant to workflow scheduling. Our results show the average performance improvement, using the GRACCE scheduler, is about 20% under high resource loads. View full abstract»

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  • On the dynamic resource availability in grids

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 26 - 33
    Cited by:  Papers (11)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2032 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Currently deployed grids gather together thousands of computational and storage resources for the benefit of a large community of scientists. However, the large scale, the wide geographical spread, and at times the decision of the rightful resource owners to commit the capacity elsewhere, raises serious resource availability issues. Little is known about the characteristics of the grid resource availability, and of the impact of resource unavailability on the performance of grids. In this work, we make first steps in addressing this twofold lack of information. First, we analyze a long-term availability trace and assess the resource availability characteristics of Grid'5000, an experimental grid environment of over 2,500 processors. The average utilization for the studied trace is increased by almost 5%, when availability is considered. Based on the results of the analysis, we further propose a model for grid resource availability. Our analysis and modeling results show that grid computational resources become unavailable at a high rate, negatively affecting the ability of grids to execute long jobs. Second, through trace-based simulation, we show evidence that resource availability can have a severe impact on the performance of the grid systems. The results of this step show evidence that the performance of a grid system can rise when availability is taken into consideration, and that human administration of availability change information results in 10-15 times more job failures than for an automated monitoring solution, even for a lowly utilized system. View full abstract»

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  • High-available grid services through the use of virtualized clustering

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 34 - 41
    Cited by:  Papers (6)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (255 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Grid applications comprise several components and web-services that make them highly prone to the occurrence of transient software failures and aging problems. This type of failures often incur in undesired performance levels and unexpected partial crashes. In this paper we present a technique that offers high-availability for Grid services based on concepts like virtualization, clustering and software rejuvenation. To show the effectiveness of our approach, we have conducted some experiments with OGSA-DAI middleware. One of the implementations of OGSA-DAI makes use of use of Apache Axis V1.2.1, a SOAP implementation that suffers from severe memory leaks. Without changing any bit of the middleware layer we have been able to anticipate most of the problems caused by those leaks and to increase the overall availability of the OGSA-DAI Application Server. Although these results are tightly related with this middleware it should be noted that our technique is neutral and can be applied to any other Grid service that is supposed to be high-available. View full abstract»

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  • Multi-state grid resource availability characterization

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 42 - 49
    Cited by:  Papers (6)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2267 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The functional heterogeneity of non-dedicated computational grids will increase with the inclusion of resources from desktop grids, P2P systems, and even mobile grids. Machine failure characteristics, as well as individual and organizational policies for resource usage by the grid, will increasingly vary even more than they already do. Since grid applications also vary as to how well they tolerate the failure of the host on which they run, grid schedulers must begin to predict and consider how resources will transition between availability modes. Toward this goal, this paper introduces five availability states, and characterizes a Condor pool trace that uncovers when, how, and why its resources reside in, and transition between, these states. This characterization suggests resource categories that schedulers can use to make better mapping decisions. Simulations that characterize how a variety of jobs would run on the traced resources demonstrate this approach's potential for performance improvement. A simple predictor based on the previous day's behavior indicates that the states and categories arc somewhat predictable, thereby supporting the potential usefulness of multi-state grid resource availability characterization. View full abstract»

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  • Fair resource sharing in hierarchical virtual organizations for global grids

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 50 - 57
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (191 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In global grid computing, users and resource providers organize various virtual organizations (VOs) to share resources and services. A VO organizes other sub-VOs for the purpose of achieving the VO goal, which forms hierarchical VO environments. Resource providers and VOs agree upon VO resource sharing policies, such as resource sharing amount. Thus, users in lower-layer VOs can access resources in higher-layer VOs to accomplish their common goals. In this paper, we deal with fair resource allocation problem in hierarchical VOs, so that an appropriate proportion of a VO resource for each lower-layer VO is analyzed. In addition, we provide a resource allocation scheme based on these predefined proportions. Simulation results show that the proposed approach gives better fairness as well as performance compared with other schemes. View full abstract»

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