By Topic

Agile Manufacturing, 2007. ICAM 2007. IET International Conference on

Date 9-11 July 2007

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 49
  • IET International Conference on Agile Manufacturing (ICAM 2007)

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): c1
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (234 KB)  

    The following topics are dealt with: product development; manufacturing systems; agile supply chain; product flow; supply chain support; lean production; and agile corporate strategy. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Cover

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): c2
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (117 KB)  

    First Page of the Article
    View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Agile Manufacturing

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): i
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (251 KB)  

    First Page of the Article
    View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • ICAM 2007 Supporters:

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): ii
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (244 KB)  

    First Page of the Article
    View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • ICAM 2007 is Organised by:

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): iii
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (357 KB)  

    First Page of the Article
    View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Continued

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): iv
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (294 KB)  

    First Page of the Article
    View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Author Disclaimer

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): v
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (554 KB)  

    First Page of the Article
    View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Copyright

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): vi
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (270 KB)  

    First Page of the Article
    View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • The Institution of Engineering and Technology

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): vii
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (411 KB)  

    First Page of the Article
    View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • blank

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): viii
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (120 KB)  

    This page or pages intentionally left blank. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Table of Contents

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): ix
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (389 KB)  

    First Page of the Article
    View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Table of Contents (continued)

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): x
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (426 KB)  

    First Page of the Article
    View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Table of Contents (continued)

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): xi
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (365 KB)  

    First Page of the Article
    View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Author List

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): xii
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (296 KB)  

    First Page of the Article
    View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Welcome to ICAM 2007 International Society of Agile Manufacturing

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 1 - 2
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (816 KB)  

    First Page of the Article
    View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Exploring the Application of New Data COllection Tools and Techniques in the Development of Cost Models

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 3 - 9
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (4030 KB)  

    Two aspects of the cost model development process are essential to the success of the cost model development process, particularly when cost models must be developed for processes and products that are still under development: the need to develop a coherent model development methodology and the problem of data identification and collection. This paper describes the results and findings from an investigation examining the cost modelling process in terms of data sources and data collection techniques and tools used by cost engineers and estimators when developing cost models and estimates, and highlights how the appropriate selection of these elements can contribute to make cost model generation faster, easier and more structured. A comprehensive life library of potential data sources and data collection tools and techniques has been developed and improved as new methods and sources are incorporated. This research investigation builds on the work initially conducted as an EPSRC funded research programme entitled improving the cost model development process (Grant Ref. GR/M 58818). View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • EVALUATION AND OPTIMISATION OF ERRORS IN THE REVERSE ENGINEERING PROCESS: A CASE STUDY

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 10 - 17
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (4618 KB)  

    Reverse engineering is used to reproduce a virtual model of any existing complex 3D shape. It is a fast evolving area which has a multitude of applications. It has also become an increasingly vital tool to reduce product development cycles. In conjunction with modern growing areas such as rapid prototyping or rapid tooling, this science is leading towards a rapidity, flexibility and agility discipline. This paper describes and analyses the successive errors embedded in the Reverse engineering process. Several simple components with specific geometric shapes are reverse engineered and remanufactured. Results show that the successive errors involved in each stage of the Reverse engineering process remain minimal (of the order of 0.5% or less) resulting in an overall maximum uncertainty of less than 1% between the original components and their remanufactured parts. Finally, two surface reconstruction procedures are described and compared with a suggested alternative method. This method enables the construction a CAD model with smooth surfaces without any oscillations and a closer fit to the scans. The final CAD model obtained can then be redesigned for an improved performance prior to a remanufacturing. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Meta-design for agile concurrent product design in the virtual enterprise

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 18 - 25
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (5259 KB)  

    The area of collaborative design is well-researched and many factors, including IT and other tools and techniques, which contribute to more effective collaboration, have been demonstrated. However, the implementation of these techniques in order to achieve a more agile collaborative environment is relatively under-researched, particularly at the design stage where agility is less well defined than at the manufacture stage. The article investigates the level of adoption of these factors in the defence and aerospace industry in Northern England, and their benefits to the level of agility in a collaborative design project. Furthermore, the article introduces meta-design as an early adoption technique for implementing agile tools and demonstrates the potential benefits of this method through data gathered by industrial questionnaire. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • NEW PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT: IMPLEMENTING PROCEDURES FOR SUSTAINABLE PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT IN SMEs UTILISING AVAILABLE TECHNOLOGIES

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 26 - 31
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (4021 KB)  

    Small to medium sized enterprises (SMEs) in the UK are increasingly engaging in new product development (NPD) for competitive advantage. With limited resources and expertise in new product and process development, introduction and implementation the associate risks are significantly higher for those involved. In this paper, enterprise resource planning (ERP) technology is used to provide an insight into the relationship between technology application, personnel involvement and sustainable product development in a subcontract manufacturing SME. The aim is to provide a product development strategy supported by the implementation of sustainable product development procedures through the utilization of available, advanced technologies. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • STREAMLINING THE ORDER-DELIVERY PROCESS WITH A FRAMEWORK FOR IMPROVING MANUFACTURING SYSTEMS

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 32 - 40
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (5860 KB)  

    This paper presents a framework for evaluating and improving manufacturing systems that is being developed in an on-going research project. The framework is intended to assist companies in evaluating the current state, and identifying the improvement potential, of their manufacturing systems. The framework consists of desired characteristics of a manufacturing system that have been classified along two dimensions: decision areas in manufacturing system improvement and manufacturing objectives. With regard to manufacturing, the aim is to support the development of a manufacturing system that is able to produce the required product variety and volume efficiently, using rapid and reliable processes. The framework is considered from the viewpoint of the order-delivery process. It is shown that the framework supports simplifying and streamlining the configuration and manufacturing processes, which contributes towards improving the performance of an order-delivery process. The relevance of the framework is also discussed, on the basis of which the framework is seen to have the potential to become a useful tool for companies aiming to improve their manufacturing systems and order-delivery processes. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • READY CONFIGURATION OF MACHINES INTO AN EXISTING MANUFACTURING SYSTEM

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 41 - 50
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (7103 KB)  

    This paper focuses on simplifying and easing the integration of a new machine into an existing conventional hierarchical manufacturing system. Based on a distributed manufacturing paradigm, it proposes the functions and interfaces that a new machine and an existing manufacturing system should possess so that ready and simple configuration of additional machines can be achieved. The configuration process is intended to include not only mechanical and electrical interfaces but also decision system interfaces too (such as planning, scheduling and shop floor control). The preliminary experiments to compare the reconfigurability resulting from a conventional integration method and the proposed distributed method are presented. The results are then discussed. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Modularization and Simulation-Based Optimization of Work Piece Handling in Manufacturing Cells

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 51 - 56
    Cited by:  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3940 KB)  

    For manufacturers of machine tools a core challenge is to offer complete, client-specific production systems as a system supplier. Consequently, the requirements for automation and handling technology are constantly increasing. In particular, the type of linkage between machine tools and peripheral devices is very important. Usually several suppliers are involved in the development of an agile manufacturing system (AMS), due to the numerous components of handling systems. In most cases, there is no transparency about the process chain, the capabilities and necessities of handling and automation functions on all supplier levels. Furthermore, every supplier optimizes its own part of the system in terms of cost, cycle time and availability. The wbk Institute of Production Science developed a new simulation-based configuration tool for an optimal sharing of automation and handling functions among the suppliers of AMS. The focus of the approach lies on the automation and handling functions, such as transport, clamping, gripping, and the layout of machining cells, but not on the optimization of machine tools themselves. The objective of this paper is to achieve an overall optimum regarding output, utilization of machining cells and availability of an integrated automation process chain. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • CASE STUDY: TIME-BASED BENEFITS OF AGILE ASSEMBLY LINES COMPARED TO ASSEMBLY IN A GROUP OF CELLS

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 57 - 63
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (4221 KB)  

    This paper presents a case study comparing the assembly of hoists grouped by function and assembly organised into short visually controlled agile assembly lines. The purpose of the study is to analyse the benefits and disadvantages of the three systems. The study is focused on differences in quantitative factors such as production hours and assembly lead time. The case assembly system produces 2000 units annually. Products are assembled in four main stages and in some subassembly cells. There are 4 different types of product in production, and every type has some variation, but the main process flow is the same. During the study the assembly system was changed from groups to flow lines. The system output was registered before the change, during the change, and after the change. The actual lead times of the products are also registered at the same time. There are several potential benefits in assembly lines compared to cells. The simulation shows an 11% decrease in direct assembly hours. The time is in line with experience with the case system. The lead time decreased from 2.5 days to 1 day in the simulation; this was also in line with the results with the case system. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • FLEXIBLE MANUFACTURING SYSTEMS NEED FLEXIBLE PEOPLE - BUT HOW DO YOU RECRUIT, MANAGE AND DEVELOP THEM?

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 64 - 73
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (6943 KB)  

    In this paper we present the background to and integration of a range tools and methodologies into a holistic approach for selecting, managing and developing the sort of flexible people that are required for modern agile manufacturing systems. The sciences and methodologies are introduced and we explain how these powerful approaches can be understood and deployed for business benefits by line managers. Some examples, as well as implementation strategies are used to explain the methodologies and their limitations. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • EMPIRICAL MANAGEMENT OF ENGINEERING PROJECTS: A COMMON SENSE APPROACH TO AGILITY

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 74 - 77
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2473 KB)  

    A traditional approach to management of engineering projects invariably tends to prescribe a predefined process. In semiconductor manufacturing, a standard approach to process control involves the application of a predefined mathematical model that sufficiently describes the relationship between inputs and outputs of a physical system Such a model is effective in controlling physical processes, however, when the objective is to manage human processes then a predefined control model may no longer be able lo sufficiently describe the relationship between inputs and outputs, requirements and deliverables. In cases where human processes are to be managed, an empirical model is often able to more readily adapt to emergent characteristics in a project. An empirical model is one which does not attempt to comprehensively describe the system with a predefined formula, but simply adjusts the inputs respective to observed changes in the outputs with the objective of billing the target. The idea of empirical process control is an underpinning of agile development methodologies such as Scrum and provides a pragmatic basis for management of engineering projects in general. The rationale for this assertion follows logically from a common sense perspective about the uncertainty of future events. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.