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Coordinated and Multiple Views in Exploratory Visualization, 2007. CMV '07. Fifth International Conference on

Date 2-2 July 2007

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  • Fifth International Conference on Coordinated and Multiple Views in Exploratory Visualization - Cover

    Page(s): c1
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  • Fifth International Conference on Coordinated and Multiple Views in Exploratory Visualization - Title page

    Page(s): i - iii
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  • Fifth International Conference on Coordinated and Multiple Views in Exploratory Visualization - Copyright

    Page(s): iv
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  • Fifth International Conference on Coordinated and Multiple Views in Exploratory Visualization - Table of contents

    Page(s): v - vii
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  • Preface

    Page(s): vii
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  • Acknowledgments

    Page(s): ix
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  • Organisers

    Page(s): x
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  • International Programme and Reviewing Committee

    Page(s): xi
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  • Interactive Visual Analysis of a Timing Chain Drive Using Segmented Curve View and other Coordinated Views

    Page(s): 3 - 15
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1402 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A timing chain drive transfers motion from the engine's crankshaft to the camshaft that operates the valves. The design process of timing chain drives involves computer simulation of many design variants in order to find an optimum. Most of the simulation results can be represented as families of function graphs (data series). Previously, the analysis of those results was based on static 2D diagrams and animated 3D visualizations. They were suitable for the detailed analysis of a few simulation variants, but not for the comparison of many cases. In this paper we propose a new approach to the analysis based on coordinated linked views and advanced brushing features. Our proposed method supports the interactive analysis of many design variants. We introduce a novel view, called segmented curve view, which can display distributions in families of function graphs. The segmented curve view combines individual function graphs where for a fixed value of the independent variable, a bar extends from minimum to maximum values across the family of function graphs. Each bar is divided into segments (bins) with a color that represents the number of function graphs with the value in that segment. In the case study, we demonstrate that the new view combined with "traditional" views provides a strong support for the interactive visual exploration and analysis of a real world timing chain design problem. View full abstract»

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  • Coordinating Linear and 2D Displays to Support Exploratory Search

    Page(s): 16 - 26
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (869 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Linear and 2D displays have complementary strengths and this paper illustrates how they can be used in concert to support users in the search process. Linear lists are the dominant way for presenting search results and users are most familiar with such result displays. However, ranked lists can only display a limited number of results, whereas 2D layouts can display many results. This paper illustrates how several tightly coupled displays and controls can help users to explore large result sets. Further, it shows how linear and 2D displays can be combined to enable users to see structural relationships between the search results, such as being related to the same topics, tags or being stored on the same web host. View full abstract»

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  • Computational Diagnostics: A Novel Approach to Viewing Medical Data

    Page(s): 27 - 34
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (866 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A transition from traditional paper-based medical records to electronic health records is underway. The resulting massive amounts of electronic patient records offer tremendous potential to personalize patient diagnosis and treatment. In this paper, we discuss a computational diagnostics tool that uses digital medical records to help physicians gain better insight about a patient's medical condition. The paper details different interactive features of the tool and discusses the tool's potential in the practice of evidence-based medicine and for advancing patient diagnosis practices. View full abstract»

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  • Hierarchical Linked Views

    Page(s): 35 - 46
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1833 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Coordinated views have proven critical to the development of effective visualization environments. This results from the fact that a single view or representation of the data cannot show all of the intricacies of a given data set. Additionally, users will often need to correlate more data parameters than can effectively be integrated into a single visual display. Typically, development of multiple-linked views results in an adhoc configuration of views and associated interactions. The hierarchical model we are proposing is geared towards more effective organization of such environments and the views they encompass. At the same time, this model can effectively integrate much of the prior work on interactive and visual frameworks. Additionally, we expand the concept of views to incorporate perceptual views. This is related to the fact that visual displays can have information encoded at various levels of focus. Thus, a global view of the display provides overall trends of the data while focusing in on individual elements provides detailed specifics. View full abstract»

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  • Integrating Data and Quality Space Interactions in Exploratory Visualizations

    Page(s): 47 - 60
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1180 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Data quality is an important topic for many fields because real-world data is rarely perfect. Analysis conducted on data of variable quality can lead to inaccurate or incorrect results. To avoid this problem, researchers have introduced visual elements and attributes into traditional visualization displays to represent data quality information in conjunction with the original data. However, little work thus far has focused on creating an interactive interface to enable users to explicitly explore that data quality information. In this paper, we propose a framework for the linkage between data space and quality space for multivariate visualizations. Moreover, we introduce two novel techniques, quality brushing and quality-series animation, to help users with the exploration of this linkage. A visualization technique specifically designed for the quality space, called the quality map, is proposed as a means to help users create and manipulate quality brushes. We present some interesting case studies to show the effectiveness of our approaches. View full abstract»

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  • State of the Art: Coordinated & Multiple Views in Exploratory Visualization

    Page(s): 61 - 71
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (828 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The area of coordinated and multiple views has been steadily developing and maturing over the past fifteen years. Some may say that it is a "solved problem', while others argue that we are only just scratching the surface of the subject. Considering merely the CMV conference series, it is clear to see that in the early years researchers were concerned with models and techniques, while in latter years authors presented more work on how to apply these ideas to different domains. It is our view that there is still much research to be done, but the subject is changing and developing as a tool for visual analytics. This paper provides the "state of the art' of CMV, it describes areas that should be developed further and looks at what the future may hold for coordinated and multiple views. View full abstract»

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  • Coordinated Multiple Views: a Critical View

    Page(s): 72 - 74
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (197 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Hundreds of papers have been presented at the five conferences on coordinated and multiple views (CMV) in exploratory visualization and related conferences on information visualization and visual analytics. However, CMV are still rarely implemented in commercial systems and many users are even not aware that multiple views are useful and coordination can help them to solve their problems. Even toolkits especially designed for information visualization often do not offer any coordination mechanisms for multiple views. One of possible reasons for this may be that existing CMV tools and approaches are insufficiently suited to real-life problems. Most of the CMV tools deal with single-table data sets of rather small sizes. A typical implementation allows one to create several displays (statistical graphics and/or geographical maps) representing individual entities and/or aggregates (e.g., histograms) and link them by brushing and selection. The displays are coordinated through exchanging references to selected entities. To our best knowledge, this approach works efficiently for tables with sizes up to about 105 records. Linking displays that reflect larger tables causes significant delays. View full abstract»

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  • Panel Position Statement: The Future of CMV

    Page(s): 75
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (62 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    While coordinated views have gained acceptance in wide ranging environments, there remains the issue of how to effectively deal with coordinated views in new devices. For instance, multiple monitor setups are gaining ground. Does this change the way in which coordinated views behave? Does the distance the user's visual focus and cursor control have to move change the way in which coordinated views must be interacted with? Similarly, the extensive use of mobile devices for computing, such as PDAs, cell phones, music payers, etc. will require new thoughts as to how to integrate coordinated views. The small screens, ability to rapidly switch between views, and touch based interaction will all drastically change the way coordinated views are integrated. The extent to which such devices are used and the complexity of the software running on them requires such a level of sophistication; typical mobile devices are more powerful than desktops from a decade ago. As coordinated views technology continues to develop we must validate their effectiveness through quantitative user studies and formal analysis. Most user studies to date have been qualitative (i.e. subjective) in nature. A formal validation provided by quantitative analysis will strengthen the long standing argument that coordinated views improve the effectiveness of visualization environments. Finally, putting on my forensics hat, we need to consider the metaphors by which analysts interact with visualization environments. With coordinated views it can become much more challenging to explain to a jury how results were acquired when coordinated views are integrated into the environment. How can we simplify the metaphor and the comprehensibility of the analysis activity? Forensic analysis, however, does provide an enormous opportunity for the CMV community. When attempting to validate activity, analysts must often correlate activity across multiple disparate data sets. This may include hard drive data, network traff- ic data, web access logs, ISP logs, bank records, etc. Clicking on one time period would need to show correlations and anti-correlations in all other records. Consider this on a massive scale for dozens or hundreds of potential suspects with terabyte+ datasets and the analysis challenge becomes enormous. The opportunity for the CMV community to contribute to this field should not be missed. View full abstract»

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  • Requirements for coordinated multiple view visualization systems for industrial applications

    Page(s): 76 - 79
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (473 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this paper we discuss the importance of commercial visualization application development on the progress of research on coordinated multiple view visualization techniques. There is a need for scalable infovis visualization solutions which is in fact the need to control the growing complexity in business data sets. The CMV visualization systems users need solutions which bring insight the complexity of their data. The progress in CMV visualization will be determined by the effort companies put in these problems to help clients with business data in combination with their collaboration with the CMV researchers at the universities. View full abstract»

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  • Is Coordination a Means to Collaboration?

    Page(s): 80 - 84
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (157 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Coordinated multiple view (CMV) approaches have become commonplace in the development of visual tools for information visualization and visual analytics. However, research and development in CMV has focused almost exclusively on the exploratory and analytic needs of individual users working in traditional interactive desktop environments. Current understanding of collaboration in terms of perception, interaction, conceptualization, and social organization begs for integrated approaches to exploration and analysis that support visualization of information in multiple coordinated views by multiple actors working across time and space in multiple roles and environments. This statement outlines two key aspects of a possible strategy for achieving acquisition, exploration, communication, and management of information in a collaborative exploratory visualization environment built on top of a solid foundation of well-established CMV techniques. View full abstract»

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  • The GAV Toolkit for Multiple Linked Views

    Page(s): 85 - 97
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1277 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Implementing InfoVis multivariate data tools, timelinked coordinated views and visual dynamic queries with conditioning from scratch is not a simple programming task. Our research objective is to develop a generic GeoAnalytics visualization (GAV) component toolkit, based on the principles behind visual analytics (VA), for dynamically exploring time-varying, geographically referenced and multivariate attributes simultaneously. GAV includes components based on a synergy of technologies from information visualization, geovisualization and scientific visualization. Our research concentrates on improving visual user interfaces (VUI) methods and trying to extend existing visual representation techniques. The effectiveness of our proposed component toolkit and framework is demonstrated in two customized applications GeoWizard analysing multivariate energy usage data for Swedish municipalities and MD-Explorer exploring multivariate data using novel interactive ternary diagrams. We use parallel coordinates with embedded visual inquiry methods that serves as a visual control panel for dynamically linked and coordinated views. Finally, discoveries made during the visual exploration process can be captured and organized in a format for later recall and communication to others. View full abstract»

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  • Interactive cross-detector analysis of vortical flow data

    Page(s): 98 - 110
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1392 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this paper we discuss the application of multiple linked views for advanced vortex investigation in flow data. Local feature detectors and additional measures integrate into an interactive flow feature detection system based on multiple linked views. We discuss how linking and brushing of derived feature information can lead to increased performance in interactive feature analysis. In a case study we demonstrate how the possibility to integrate the information of multiple detectors leads to sound understanding of vortex type features. Enhanced credibility and combined advantages of several detectors can be achieved by uniting the results of multiple feature detectors in multiple coordinated views. View full abstract»

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  • Author index

    Page(s): 111
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