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Instrumentation and Measurement Technology Conference, 2006. IMTC 2006. Proceedings of the IEEE

Date 24-27 April 2006

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  • [Front cover]

    Publication Year: 2006
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  • [Breaker page]

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): nil1
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  • IEEE Instrumentation and Measurement Technology Conference

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): I
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  • Copyright page

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): II
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  • Welcome to a View on the New Technologies for Instrumentation and Measurements

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): III - IV
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  • Design and Testing of Human Machine Interfaces in Automotive Industry

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): V
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  • Magnetic Sensors for Navigation and Security Applications

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): VI
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (39 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Summary form only for tutorial. Magnetic sensors are key elements in many security, military, and navigation systems. Fast development of new sensor types such as AMR (Anisotropic MagnetoResistors), GMR (Giant Magneto-Resistance), SDT (Spin- Dependent Tunelling) and GMI (Giant Magneto-Impedance) brings new opportunities; but not all new is better. The purpose of this tutorial is to critically review the principles and properties of modern magnetic sensors and show how they presently are employed in navigation and security applications and what is their future potential. The emphasis will be given for mine and UXO (Unexploded Ordnance) location. 1. Principles and techniques: - principles of DC magnetic sensors suitable for security applications (incl. AMR, GMR, SDT and miniaturized resonant and fluxgate sensors) - eddy-current methods - induction magnetometers - electromagnetic methods including ELF and Ground Penetrating Radar - imaging techniques, signal processing, recognition - gradiometric techniques, sensor fusion - calibration and error corrections 2. Applications - Mine detection - UXO location - Detection and recognition of vehicles (incl. submersible) - Detection frames and other sensors for border security - Magnetic labels and anti-theft systems - Navigation systems - Magnetic tracking - Distance measurement - Distributed sensors and sensor areas View full abstract»

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  • Space navigation systems and the role of clocks. The adopted solutions in the existing GPS system and in the planned Galileo system

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): VI - VII
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    Summary form only for tutorial. This tutorial will present the general principles and nomenclature for orbits, space navigation, different types of navigation, and their requirements for electronic measurements. It will explore the role of the atomic clocks and time scales in global navigation. The tutorial will also give the important characteristics of the existing Global Positioning System and of the future GALILEO System, which will become operative in 2008 or 2009. Finally,the tutorial will cover some particular solutions for some very specific requirements, primarily for the use of systems in air and sea navigation in restricted areas. The tutorial will present its information in this sequence: Principle of navigation, orbits, and systems of localization Time scales and clocks in navigation systems Description of the GPS navigation system and the Galileo project Timing systems in GPS and Galileo View full abstract»

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  • Developing Real-Time Embedded Products

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): VII
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    Summary form only for tutorial. Part 1 (Morning session): Introduction and Noise and Shielding This tutorial will give an introduction to the issues and overall picture in designing real-time embedded systems. First the tutorial will provide the general principles used in design and development, illustrated with case studies and examples. Topics include: systems engineering, documentation, human interface, packaging, grounding and shielding, circuit design, power, cooling, software, review and testing, production, procurement, maintenance, and disposal. After the introduction will be specific discussions into electromagnetic noise and how to design circuits and shielding to avoid it. The topics include: mechanisms of noise coupling, shielding, electrostatic discharge (ESD), general diagnostics, layout of signal traces, cables, and enclosures. Part 2 (Afternoon session): Tradeoffs, Scheduling, Mission-Critical Systems, and Failures The second set of lectures gets into specifics of design and development and their tradeoffs. The lecture will begin by addressing the eternal question that faces most of us: Do we build? Or do we buy? What architecture do we choose? The choice is between custom development and purchasing components or subsystems for the final design. Issues covered are: specifications, time, cost, and resources. Many case studies and examples will be given. Then the tutorial will present specifics of scheduling and estimating design and development. Hopefully you will find ways you can improve your estimating accuracy. The tutorial will then cover issues in designing mission-critical and safety-critical systems. View full abstract»

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  • Automatic Spectral Estimation with Time Series Models

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): VII - VIII
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (46 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Summary form only for tutorial. Automatic spectral estimation gives random data a language to communicate the information it contains. This tutorial treats the recently developed automatic identification of a single time series model for measured random data. One model is selected, with statistical rules, from hundreds of candidates. That model provides an accurate parametric representation of the power spectral density and of the autocorrelation function of the stochastic data. The accuracy of this autocorrelation function is always better than the usual autocorrelation estimate obtained with lagged products of the random observations. Likewise, the accuracy of the spectral density is always better than the accuracy of tapered and windowed periodograms. Let the data themselves decide about their best representation, they can! Three types of time series models can be distinguished: autoregressive (AR), moving average (MA) and combined ARMA. The recent ability to identify an appropriate time series model for measured stochastic data has three causes: increased computational speed, finite sample order selection criteria, and developments in the reliability of time series algorithms. Time series models are excellent for random data, if the best model type and the best model order are known. With the new ARMAsel toolbox, that a priori information is no longer required. For unknown data characteristics, a large number of candidate models are computed. The ARMAsel Matlab?? computer program automatically selects the best model order for each of the three model types and also the best model type. View full abstract»

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  • Fundamentals of measurement science and instrumentation

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): VIII - IX
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    Summary form only for tutorial. Measuring systems and instruments are becoming more and more complex and are presently capable of performing advanced measurement operations. The recent developments in sensor technology, analog-to-digital converters, and computational capabilities of DSP devices, and the relative simplicity with which these components can be interconnected have opened new possibilities to measurement science and practice. These developments are revealing a number of new issues involving the very fundamentals of the measurement science, from the definition of a new measurement paradigm to the metrological characterization of the measured results. This tutorial is therefore aimed at reconsidering these basic issues, having in mind their application to the modern measuring systems. A model of the measurement process, as a bridge between the empirical world and the world of knowledge and abstract concepts, will be presented. Within this model, the measurement process is only capable of providing incomplete knowledge (the measurement result) about the measurand. It will be shown how an incomplete knowledge about the measurand is still acceptable, provided that we are capable of estimating how incomplete this knowledge is. Starting from this consideration, the methods for characterizing the result of a measurement will be discussed, focusing mainly on the uncertainty, calibration, and traceability concepts. A short survey on the International Metrology Organizations will be also given. After having introduced the basic concept of metrology, a basic instrument diagram will be introduced, and the diagram of the modern systems based on digital signal processing techniques will be discussed in deeper details. View full abstract»

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  • Achieving Accurate and Reliable Low Level Electrical Measurements

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): IX
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    Summary form only for tutorial. This tutorial offers the participants the skills to identify low level measurements and to relate an electrically measured quantity to the physical property of interest. At the conclusion of the tutorial, participants will be able to identify and explain fundamental limitations and non-idealities of basic electrical measurements, as well as the techniques to address them. In pursuit of this goal, the tutorial will include a discussion of the Johnson Noise equation as a primary method of determining the finite limit of voltage and current measurements. The presenter will provide an overview of common sources of error in test environments. Participants will understand how to negate offset voltages and avoid the effects of temperature fluctuations when making low voltage measurements. The tutorial describes the use of current reversal techniques in low resistance measurements to compensate for thermoelectric voltage errors. The presentation will also consider techniques for making successful low current and high impedance measurements. As an introduction, participants will learn about common measurement mistakes, including contamination and the use of improper cables, and their impact on test results. The presenter will show how guarding and shielding are effective in reducing leakage currents due to imperfect insulators and in eliminating interference from radio frequency, electromagnetic, and electrostatic sources. The tutorial will present an example of how these methods are combined to yield femtoamp-level current measurements. To link the theoretical with the practical, throughout the tutorial, the presenter will show how real instrumentation differs from ideal. View full abstract»

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  • Special Session Organizers

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): X
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  • Parallel events to IMTC/2006

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): XI
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  • Call for papers

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): XIII
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  • IEEE Joseph F. Keithley Award in Instrumentation and Measurement

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): XIV - XV
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  • IMTC: A Measurement Tradition

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): XVI
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  • Conference committee

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): XVII
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  • IEEE Instrumentation and Measurement Society

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): XVIII
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  • list-reviewer

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): XIX
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  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): XXI - LV
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  • Author index

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): LVII - LXVIII
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  • [Breaker page]

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 1
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  • 3-D Shape Measurement Method by a 6-axis Robot and a New Sensor Having Ability of Detecting Both the 2-D Incident Angle and Position of a Light

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 2 - 7
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (734 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this paper, we propose a new laser rangefinder equipped with a 6-axis robot and a new sensor that has ability of detecting both the 2D incident angle and the 2D position of a light. It is difficult for an ordinary rangefinder to measure the 3D shape of a specular object. Then we propose the rangefinder that can measure the 3D position (x, y, z) of specular and Lambertian objects from x-z coordinate triangulation and y-z coordinate one. It is clear that the proposed rangefinder has a great potential for the 3D shape measurement of a complex-shape specular object View full abstract»

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  • Digital Imaging Based Measurement of Diesel Spray Characteristics

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 8 - 11
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (222 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper presents a direct photographic imaging and image processing system for the analysis and characterization of diesel sprays. A high-resolution CCD camera with a flash light source is used to capture the spray images through an optically accessible, constant volume chamber. A set of macroscopic characteristic parameters of the sprays including tip penetration, near and far field angles, spray tip velocity and average fuel area density are derived from the images. Experimental work was undertaken on a common rail fuel injection rig. The relationships between the spray characteristics and corresponding injection conditions are presented and discussed View full abstract»

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