By Topic

ARFTG Conference Digest-Fall, 46th

Date Nov. 1995

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 20 of 20
  • Two-Tier Multiline TRL for Calibration of Low-Cost Network Analyzers

    Page(s): 1 - 8
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (479 KB)  

    We compare calibrations for use on three-sampler vector network analyzers (VNAs), which do not allow the direct application of some advanced error-correction schemes such as TRL (thru-reflect-line). Here we compare various alternatives, including an approximate version of TRL that has been introduced commercially and two-tier multiline TRL using external software. We consider both coaxial and coplanar open-short-load -thru (OSLT) calibrations for the first tier, showing that the latter can lead to inaccuracies. Finally, we investigate the stability of the load reflection terms to show that the first tier calibration need not be frequently repeated. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A Comparative Study of TOSL, TRL, and TRL* Network Analyzer Calibration Techniques, Using Microstrip Test Fixtures

    Page(s): 9 - 18
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (562 KB)  

    For many packaged devices, both active and passive, the preferred test fixture approach is one of microstrip transmission line design. In order to achieve accurate, and reliable two port s-parameter measurements, an accurate calibration of the fixture up to the DUT reference plane is essential. Modern vector network analyzers allow several options when it comes to performing the necessary systematic error correction or calibration. This paper will present results based on verification of three different calibration techniques, by measurement of well defined microstrip impedance standards under TOSL (Thru, open, short, load), TRL (Thru, reflect, line), and TRL* (Hewlett Packard`s modified TRL for three-sampler RF test sets). View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Optimizing Time-Domain Network Analysis

    Page(s): 19 - 28
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (680 KB)  

    In this work, we demonstrate how changes in sample density, time-window size, and waveform averaging affect the accuracy and acquisition time of calibrated time-domain network analysis. One of the key results from this study is that accuracy can be enhanced by eliminating the incident step-edge signal from the time-domain reflection waveform before maximizing the instrument's vertical scale. This study identifies the trade-offs between accuracy and measurement speed and examines other trends to provide general guidance in establishing reliable and efficient time-domain network analysis measurements for a variety of rf and microwave applications. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • T-Matrix De-Embedding of IC Metal Transmission Lines to 18 GHz

    Page(s): 29 - 34
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (453 KB)  

    T-matrix methods are applied to S-parameter data from on-chip metal lines connected to microwave measurement equipment so as to preserve mirror symmetry in the entire system. The propagation constant ¿ and characteristic impedance Zin of a line are derived from measurements on two different lengths of line. It is shown here that Zin can be found with few assumptions about the transition networks. In particular, we present a theorem for determining Zin or its phase for any symmetric or lossless transition network. Multiple lengths of otherwise identical IC line allow redundant, pairwise solutions to be acquired, with high confidence in the final result. Experimental results show that today's IC metal lines at Intel can have flat R, L, G, and C to at least 18 Ghz. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Line-Reflect-Match Calibrations with Nonideal Microstrip Standards

    Page(s): 35 - 38
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (345 KB)  

    We apply a previously developed Line-Reflect-Match (LRM) calibration that compensates for the nonideal electrical behavior of the match standard to microstrip transmission lines and investigate impedance definitions, standard parasitics, and calibration accuracy. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Load-Pull Characterization and Modeling of Chip and Plastic Packaged HBT'S for PCS Amplifier Applications

    Page(s): 39 - 45
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (552 KB)  

    GaAs HBT¿s are excellent candidates for PCS power amplifier applications which require a single low-voltage supply with good efficiency and linearity. This paper describes the characterization and modeling of M/A-COM¿s chip and plastic-packaged HBT for linear power amplifier applications at 1.88GHz. This analysis includes a discussion of the device and package characteristics required for PCS amplifier applications a complete load-pull characterization for power, efficiency, and linearity a discussion of how these contours can be used to identify optimum matching conditions for linear amplifier design, and (4) the development and demonstration of a complete large-signal chip and packaged device model that accurately predicts the measured power, efficiency, and linearity. Through this analysis it is shown that for the GaAs HBT a significant improvement can be achieved in amplifier linearity by trading the device gain for linearity through an appropriate output termination. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • On Wafer RF Testing Characterizes Current SAG on GaAs MESFETs

    Page(s): 46 - 55
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (521 KB)  

    A relatively simple measurement technique aids in MESFET characterization of the phenomena known as current sag. Current sag is described as a decrease in the net DC drain current when low to medium RF power is applied. These on-wafer measurements are taken on an ATN active load pull system. The output impedance can be swept from a short to an open along the real axis of the Smith chart to understand the relationship between load line and current sag. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Using Digitally-Modulated Signals to Measure the Gain Compression and Phase Distortion of a Radio Frequency Amplifier

    Page(s): 56 - 63
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (434 KB)  

    Radio frequency amplifier linearity test data obtained from a network analyzer cw power sweep does not always match the amplifier's response to a digitally modulated carrier (which is the signal present in a communications system). This paper describes a DSP-based RF test technique which extracts the gain compression and phase distortion characteristics of an amplifier from measurements performed with a digitally-modulated test stimulus. The technique utilizes the magnitude variations inherent in phase-shift keyed (PSK) modulation to sweep the input power to an amplifier, instead of using a power sweep from a network analyzer. By downconverting the modulated signal and digitizing in the time domain, the magnitude and phase of the modulation may be measured at the input and output of the amplifier. Using the modulation instead of a cw power sweep to drive the amplifier into compression might produce better correlation between test results and actual operation, at least for PSK modulation schemes. We have demonstrated this new technique experimentally on a commercial power amplifier, where we compare network analyzer power sweep data to DSP-based results using BPSK signals at two different bit rates. For this amplifier at 1 kbps the DSP-based measurement of saturation agrees with the network analyzer measurement and demonstrates the validity of the new technique. At 100 kbps, the amplifier saturation behavior during BPSK operation differs from that measured on the network analyzer in two repects: the nonlinearity of the amplifier decreases at the higher bit rate, and the saturation shows significant time-domain hysteresis. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Automated Large-Signal Load-Pull Characterization of Adjacent-Channel Power Ratio for Digital Wireless Communication Systems

    Page(s): 64 - 70
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (364 KB)  

    Large-signal adjacent-channel power ratio load-pull contours of a GaAs MESFET and a GaAs HEMT excited by ¿4-DQPSK modulation are demonstrated for the first time using an automated load-pull system. It is shown that in general there is only a weak relationship between two-tone third-order intermodulation and adjacent-channel power ratio for the (Japanese) Personal Digital Cellular standard. The relationship is both load impedance and device technology dependent insofar as two-tone linearity characterization cannot generally be used to optimize adjacent-channel power. The load-pull system presented here is modulation and device technology independent. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A 10-6000MHz Receiver and Signal Separation Modules developed for a Mixed-Signal Automatic Test Equipment System

    Page(s): 71 - 79
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (783 KB)  

    A 10-6000MHz receiver and signal separation test set have been developed by Anritsu-Wiltron Co. and Teradyne Inc.. These modules provide multichannel 0.01-3.0GHz vector network analysis, with expansion capability to 6.0GHz. The power levels of the input signals to the receiver can vary over +13dBm ... -100dBm. The receiver has three selectable power ranges. The receiver Noise Figure is less than 9dB double sideband (DSB), over the 10-6000MHz frequency range. The receiver also provides a wideband IF output. In a mixed-signal test system, the 10-6000MHz signal separation module, which is a 100% solid-state module, provides the interface between the DUT and the receiver. It allows the de-embedding of the DUT S-parameters, and the measurement of DUT nth-order intercept points, noise figure, and P-1dB. The receiver can measure all of the modern digital modulation schemes used in PCS/PCN systems, when coupled with the broad-band DSP capability of the Teradyne A5 system. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Impedance Matching Probes for Wireless Applications

    Page(s): 80 - 87
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (739 KB)  

    This work describes the motivation, technology, design, and performance of impedance matching probes that address the needs of wireless applications. The impedance matching solution can be implemented in two distinctly different technologies, air-coplanar and thin-film membrane. Impedance matched probes offer improved load-pull characterization of power, gain and efficiency, and accurate characterization of devices with non-standard impedances. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Testing of the 2.4 GHz Band Spread Spectrum Sound Transceiver Unit Using an Elastic Type SAW Convolver

    Page(s): 88 - 94
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (377 KB)  

    The widespread use of digital communications in today's wireless environment is imminent. The market is ripe to explode with new technologies that enhance the performance of these digital systems' r2. Spread-spectrum (SS) digital communications is a method by which the information of a digital signal is transmitted across a band of frequencies in order to avoid the harmful effects of interference that can distort a digital signal and render it useless. The method by which a signal is spread over the radio frequency (RF) domain is currently the source of much debate today. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Complete characterization of low-noise devices at microwave frequencies: two alternative procedures for HEMTs

    Page(s): 95 - 103
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (430 KB)  

    The complete characterization of microwave transistors in terms of noise, gain and scattering parameters (0{,G } and [SI, respectively) vs. frequency and bias conditions is the first and most important step to design low-noise amplifiers (LNA). View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Advanced Technology Speeds RF-Integrated-Circuit Testing

    Page(s): 104 - 113
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (530 KB)  

    "Rack and stack" instrumentation has been used for many years to create systems for testing hybrid-RF modules. More recently, these systems have been modified to test monolithic RFICs. While these systems may offer a low initial hardware price, they suffer from inflexibility, long programming times, and throughputs that are much too slow to cost-effectively test RFICs in volumes that are now required. This paper will review traditional "rack and stack" system block diagram strengths and weaknesses, and briefly review the basics of a generic network analyzer. It will then, in a step-by-step fashion, evolve the network analyzer block diagram into a modern RF-ATE measurement system -- with digital technology -- that dramatically increases system throughput and flexibility. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Automatic RF Techniques Group Executive Committee Members October 12, 1994

    Page(s): 123 - 125
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (147 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • ARFTG Mailing and Membership List as of 04/12/95

    Page(s): 126 - 138
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (1200 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Table of contents

    Page(s): 1 - vii
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (259 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Survey of the articles

    Page(s): 1 - 146
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (2233 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Author index

    Page(s): 1 - 165
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (2384 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Table of contents

    Page(s): 1 - 102
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (2132 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE