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ARFTG Conference Digest-Winter, 28th ARFTG

Date Dec. 1986

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Displaying Results 1 - 18 of 18
  • Improved S11 Calibration for Network Analyzers

    Publication Year: 1986 , Page(s): 1 - 16
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
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  • Mechanical Characterization of Calibration Standards for Improved Accuracy

    Publication Year: 1986 , Page(s): 17 - 38
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    Calibration standards for network analyzers are normally supplied with nominal values used to describe them to the measurement software. Although this provides reasonably good results, improved accuracy can be achieved by individually characterizing each calibration standard based on mechanical measurements. This paper discusses techniques of characterizing coaxial and waveguide calibration standards, and methods of evaluating accuracy. View full abstract»

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  • An RF Network Analyzer Verification Process Using a Short Length of Precision Transmission Line

    Publication Year: 1986 , Page(s): 39 - 46
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    In most network analysis measurements, systematic errors such as directivity, crosstalk, port match and frequency response are the most significant sources of measurement uncertainty. The accuracy of an RF network analyzer is therefore specified in terms of these sources of error before and after calibration. Verification standards whose characteristics are known independent of the calibration process are used to verify that the system is performing to the stated specifications. This presentation discusses the verification process that was used to verify the HP 8753 RF network analyzer system performance. It also describes a verification method that uses a short length of precision transmission line as the verification standard. View full abstract»

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  • Measurement Environment Simulation of a Microwave Automatic Network Analyzer

    Publication Year: 1986 , Page(s): 47 - 55
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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  • Automatic MW Attenuation Calibration System Linearity Certification Technique

    Publication Year: 1986 , Page(s): 56 - 64
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  • ANA Measurement Results on the ARFTG Traveling Experiment

    Publication Year: 1986 , Page(s): 65 - 78
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    The Automatic Rf Techniques Group (ARFTG) Executive Committee has assembled two traveling measurement assessment kits. Each of these kits consists of: l-dB, 20-dB, 40-dB, and 60-dB attenuators; a 50-ohm termination; a 10-centimeter air line; 1.2-VSWR and 2.0-VSWR mismatched terminations; and a short circuit termination. These devices are equipped with precision 7-mm coaxial connectors. The traveling kits are being circulated among measurement laboratories that wish to assess their ability to measure reflection coefficient, attenuation, and phase shift from 300 MHz to 17 GHz. The results obtained on ten different automated measurement systems are presented. View full abstract»

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  • A Transient Response Error in Microwave Power Meters Using Thermistor Detectors

    Publication Year: 1986 , Page(s): 79 - 89
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    Broadband coaxial thermistor mounts are commonly used in automated precision microwave measurement systems such as six-port networks. To reduce the effect of temperature drift and to decrease the total measurement time, it is desirable to measure the dc bias voltage on the thermistor mount very quickly after turning the rf on or off. However, investigation has revealed that a coaxial mount may take much longer to settle to a stable dc bias voltage than the thermistor element time constant or the associated power meter servo bandwidth would indicate. If the bias voltage is measured before this transient ends, the error in the calculated rf power can be very large; as much as 1.4% has been observed. This paper describes these transients and gives measured durations and maximum error for a number of different bolometer mounts. View full abstract»

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  • A H.P. 8409-B Based Power Sensor Calibration System

    Publication Year: 1986 , Page(s): 90 - 103
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    Accurate manual calibration of RF/microwave power sensors (Thermistor, Thermoelectric and Diode Bridge mounts) is quite complex. The complete calibration process requires the measurement of both the complex impedance and Effective Efficiency of the device under test. The Calibration Factor and Statement of Uncertainties are calculated. The entire procedure can be streamlined by using computers to reduce data and to produce the Report of Calibration. Precision manual measurements at twenty-four frequency points (50 MHz to 18 GHz) usually take about six man-hours to complete. This paper describes an automated system that will produce comparable results in approximately twenty minutes. The system combines the Hewlett-Packard 8409-B Vector Automated Network Analyzer and the Hewlett-Packard 436A-E10 Power Sensor Calibration System. The resulting system is more than just a simple combination. The system is currently used to calibrate a wide variety of thermistor, thermoelectric and diode bridge mounts manufactured by Hewlett-Packard, Wavetek and Boonton Electric. The list can be easily expanded to include other such devices. The system operates from 50 MHz to 18 GHz with a crossover point at 2 GHz. View full abstract»

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  • Determining Fixture Scattering Parameters from Two Sets of 8510 Error Vectors

    Publication Year: 1986 , Page(s): 104 - 108
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    A variant of Elmore¿s de-embedding technique may be used to characterize a test fixture which only has two sets of precision connectors accessible to the network analyzer provided that each fixture half is reciprocal. The method forms an simple alternative to Peck¿s varactor technique and is usable to higher frequencies. View full abstract»

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  • The 2.4 mm Coaxial Connector: Its Design and Development Using The HP 8510

    Publication Year: 1986 , Page(s): 109 - 117
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  • An Automated Frequency Domain Scalar Network Analyzer Technique for the Separation of Small Reflections

    Publication Year: 1986 , Page(s): 118 - 129
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  • Reflections on a PC-AT as a Controller

    Publication Year: 1986 , Page(s): 130 - 134
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  • "Automatic Interfacing in Computer Programming."

    Publication Year: 1986 , Page(s): 135 - 142
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    The application of Automatic Interfacing in a computer program is described giving examples. When computer programs are structured to make choices possible then they may learn from these answers so that tasks may be automatically performed when desired. Structured programming accounts for the defaults to these answers and also allows the operator to implement changes via switches or change commands. The examples given explain the features added by the logic which remembers previous answers. In my definition, the Automatic Interfacing Program must contain four sections. 1. The first section, called "Learning", is the input section which should do more than just accept information. It should check to see if the information is valid within numerical limits, or valid within syntactic limits. If not, at this point, the program should correct for any mistakes on input. 2. The second section of a controlled program, I have called the "Decision Section". It is at this point that choices art to be made and truth tables eatablished for the rules which are governing the decisions. This may require exacting calculations in order to provide the basis for decision. In all cases, the decision should be registered in an accessible database form for easy observation. It is at this point that a branch should also be made to a "Forgiveness" section, where changes can be made if the logic does not give satisfactory resu1ts. 3. The third section of the computer program is commonly called the "Action" section, or the "Output". View full abstract»

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  • New CAT Program Enhances Network Analyzer Calibration and Characterization

    Publication Year: 1986 , Page(s): 143 - 157
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    Recently developed Computer-Aided Test (CAT) programs, such as EEsof¿s ANACAT program, now provide flexible and interactive means of calibrating network analyzers, viewing the data graphically, and deembedding devices with much greater efficiency than before possible. The S-parameter data can be viewed through several standard formats or with the use of user-defined forms. The data can also be used directly in microwave simulator programs, such as Touchstone. In addition, the program can convert the data into the DIF format (Data Interchange Format) for immediate use in database manager programs such as Lotus. With far greater control through software, the designer can pursue many exciting applications quickly and effectively. The following will illustrate many new features now available to increase the accuracy and efficiency of network analyzer data. View full abstract»

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  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 1986 , Page(s): 1 - 3
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Survey of the articles

    Publication Year: 1986 , Page(s): 1 - 146
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Author index

    Publication Year: 1986 , Page(s): 1 - 165
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 1986 , Page(s): 1 - 102
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    Freely Available from IEEE