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25th Digital Avionics Systems Conference, 2006 IEEE/AIAA

Date 15-19 Oct. 2006

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Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 129
  • [Front cover]

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): C1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • [Sessions listing]

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 1 - 12
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Dynamic Service Composition: Swim using the Topia Conveyance Concept and Sensis SPM

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 1 - 11
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (204 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper describes the mobile object and conveyance architectures supporting the new service in a notional, net-centric SWIM (system-wide information management) environment, the many benefits and uses of Sensis SPM (surveillance performance monitor) data, and provide the development efforts required by other NAS (National Airspace System) system providers to link to this service or to develop a similar SWIM service with Topia mobile objects View full abstract»

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  • The Business Case for System-Wide Information Management

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 1 - 13
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (298 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In today's National Airspace System (NAS), when an application requires information from another application, a custom application-to-application interface is built. This results in an increasingly complex system, where applications are tightly coupled and expensive to develop and maintain. System-wide information management (SWIM) addresses these shortfalls by implementing a shared infrastructure for managing NAS information. SWIM is based on a service-oriented architecture, a fast growing trend in information technology. It will help the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) meet the information-sharing needs of the Next Generation Air Traffic System (NGATS) and the federal government's E-government Initiative. SWIM will reduce the cost, complexity and cycle time for building new applications and help the FAA implement SWIM-enabled applications that increase FAA and user productivity View full abstract»

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  • What is System Wide Information Management (SWIM)?

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 1 - 8
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (890 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    System wide information management (SWIM) has been identified by the FAA as a key enabler for the Next Generation Air Traffic System (NGATS). Boeing has been working with the FAA since 2004 to define the role of SWIM within the framework of the existing and envisioned set of National Airspace System (NAS) communications systems and air traffic operations. SWIM, as an information management infrastructure, in effect creates a "system of systems" of existing (and new) systems (or software applications, or simply applications) interacting through SWIM services. Describing SWIM in such a context is only fruitful when adopting the point of view of each person based on their role and perspective of airspace operations, be they a user, an application developer, or a SWIM implementer. This paper describes our current vision of SWIM from multiple viewpoints (operational, functional, physical) in an attempt to provide a broad perspective of SWIM to a technical audience of mixed backgrounds View full abstract»

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  • An Architecture for System-Wide Information Management

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 1 - 13
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1091 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    System-wide information management (SWIM) is a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) network-centric environment that facilitates software application integration in the National Airspace System (NAS). Built on a set of five core service types - interfaces, registries, message brokers, information assurance and system management - SWIM accelerates NAS evolution by defining a secure common infrastructure for application integration and a framework for information modeling and exchange. The SWIM architecture is based on industry best practices, thereby reducing the cost and risk of application development and maintenance in the NAS View full abstract»

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  • A Software Factory for Air Traffic Data

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 1 - 7
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (256 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Modern enterprise architecture requires a flexible, scalable and upgradeable infrastructure that allows communication, and subsequently collaboration, between heterogeneous information processing and computing environments. Heterogeneous systems often use different data representations for the same data items, limiting collaboration. Although this problem is conceptually straightforward, the process of data conversion is error prone, often dramatically underestimated, and surprisingly complex. The complexity is often the result of the non-standard data representations that are used by computing systems in the aviation domain. This paper describes some of the work that is being done by Boeing Advanced Air Traffic Management to address this challenge. A prototype software factory for air traffic data management is being built and evaluated. The software factory provides the capability for a user such as a Systems Engineer or an Air Traffic Domain Expert to create an interface model. The model will allow the user to specify entities such as data items, scaling, units, headers and footers, representation, and coding. The factory automatically creates a machine usable interface. A prototype for a Domain Specific Language to assist in this task is being developed View full abstract»

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  • Aircraft Data Networks and Performance Enhancement Proxies

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 1 - 6
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (196 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    With the increased deployment of data networks within the aircrafts, it is important to find ways to provide better service to user traffic. In order to provide Internet services within the aircraft, it is important to use the services of satellite networks. Satellite networks introduce high amount of delay in the data transfer process. Internet traffic based on transport control protocol (TCP) suffers due to the high delay introduced by the satellite network. Performance enhancement proxies have proved to be beneficial in the satellite network environment when Internet traffic was transported over the satellite network. In this paper, the authors investigate the advantages of using performance enhancement proxies in the aircraft data network environment View full abstract»

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  • Exploring Network Enabled Airspace Integration Functions for a UAV Mission Management Station

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 1 - 11
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1152 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The research project aims to explore the potential of network connectivity between a UAV control station (UCS), command and control (C2), and air traffic control (ATC) in the area of airspace integration. To support this research, a networked simulation environment has been created allowing mission-level simulations to be performed. Functions and user-interfaces have been designed to explore possibilities regarding integration with other assets, conflict prediction and resolution, dynamic re-planning, and dealing with datalink failures. In 2005 and 2006 a number of demonstrations has been performed to subject matter experts. These demonstrations have resulted in a better understanding of the opportunities, options, challenges and issues associated with the concepts View full abstract»

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  • Commercial Aircraft Information Security-an Overview of ARINC Report 811

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 1 - 12
    Cited by:  Papers (6)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (414 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper provides an overview of ARINC Report 811, Commercial Aircraft Information Security Concepts of Operation and Process Framework. ARINC Report 811 was developed by airline and industry participants of the Airlines Electronic Engineering Committee (AEEC) Aircraft Information Security (SEC) Subcommittee, and it was adopted by the airline members of the AEEC in October 2005. ARINC Report 811 describes a three-step risk-based information security process framework, that considers existing airline operations and the organizational impact associated with the introduction of new aircraft information security procedures, particularly with respect to the management of mobile, global aircraft assets View full abstract»

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  • System-Wide Information Management (SWIM) Demonstration Security Architecture

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 1 - 12
    Cited by:  Papers (2)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (325 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    System-wide information management (SWIM) is a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) network-centric environment that facilitates software application integration in the National Airspace System (NAS). Built on a set of five core service types - interfaces, registries, message brokers, information assurance and system management - SWIM accelerates NAS evolution by defining a secure common infrastructure for application integration and a framework for information modeling and exchange. Providing information security in this distributed network-centric environment is a significant challenge. System users must be confident that their critical data is protected. Competing requirements, the transportation of sensitive data and air-to-ground bandwidth constraints mean that a network layer-based approach to security is no longer sufficient. Trusted security at every layer of a network-centric architecture - combined with strong identity management and a data-oriented approach to information assurance - is the key to success. This paper introduces the FAA SWIM demonstration security architecture, and explores some of the methods and mechanisms used to provide end-to-end security, confidentiality, integrity, availability and privacy for NAS applications and their users View full abstract»

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  • Validation Facilities in the Area of ATM Bottleneck Investigation

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 1 - 9
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (280 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Due to the steady growth of commercial air transport, demand often leads capacity. An increase of capacity while maintaining the same or higher level of safety can only be achieved by introducing new systems and/or procedures, which can be developed and validated with the help of validation facilities prior to real life operation. The validation facilities of DLR's Institute of Flight Guidance with their flexibility and scalability permit a wide range of adaptation to specific goals of development and validation. This paper focuses on the following realtime human-in-the-loop (HIL) simulation facilities: 1) Air Traffic Management and Operations Simulator (ATMOS); 2) Apron and Tower Simulator (ATS); 3) Airport and Control Centre Simulator (ACCES); and 4) Generic Cockpit Simulator (GECO). It is possible to perform small tests with only one facility or even a sub-part of it involved, as well as up to large distributed simulations with several networked facilities and the associated amount of operators, thus the scalability covers a wide range of experiments. These possibilities of conducting simulations can focus on isolated or widespread objectives, depending on the complexity of interrelation between the areas of interest View full abstract»

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  • The "European" Operational Concept Validation Methodology (E-OCVM)

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 1 - 10
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (297 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The E-OCVM is now a "standard" to be applied to all European ATM R&D projects. It facilitates the accessibility of results and their transfer to operations. The E-OCVM has supported good progress in a difficult aspect of ATM R&D. It is part of a continuous process and thus improvements will continually be made to the methodology and its supporting material over the coming years View full abstract»

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  • Exploring Applicability of Grid Technologies to Net Centric "Edge" Systems

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 1 - 12
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (207 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Scientific grids are often characterized by an infrastructure made up of high speed and reliable networks that connect heterogeneous and distributed compute and storage devices. This is in stark contrast to the concept behind the global information grid (GIG). The GIG is an interconnected information transfer infrastructure meant to provide seamless interoperability and information dominance to the war-fighter. This paper explores the applicability of the Web services based grid technologies for monitoring and discovery, workflow, and QoS, to the net centric "edge" applications on the GIG. We discuss the salient features of current grid technologies, along with examples wherever applicable, highlight the ideas that can be readily utilized for "edge" systems, and point out the gap that exists for other required features View full abstract»

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  • A Prototype Dual Can-Bus Avionics System for Small Aircraft Transportation System

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 1 - 10
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1427 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper presents a prototype fabrication and verification on a dual CAN bus system for digital avionics in small aircraft systems. It is extending from a preliminary single CAN-bus study. The proposed dual data bus integrates CAN plus TTP to enhance system performance. For the proposed dual bus avionics, new circuit designs using hardware selector and memory mapping technique are discussed. The system CPU load using hardware selector is much less than the memory mapping by software. Circuit board fabrication and test is verified and extended into PC controlled performance. In the tests, a primary flight display suitable for small aircraft transportation system application is constructed with several functions for terminal data exchange control. Each node will be connected to real instruments or sensors, as well as several simulated signals. In the dual bus IP board design, two configurations by software are considered for different integration requirements. This prototype dual CAN bus system is also performed to verify characteristic enhancement in system reliability and stability View full abstract»

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  • Partitioning Communications System for High Assurance Distributed Systems

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 1 - 8
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (230 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The partitioning communications system (PCS) is architecture for securing distributed systems with high assurance. It provides strong authentication and trustworthy separation of data by sensitivity/safety level and by community of interest. Channel bandwidth is managed, increasing total throughput while simultaneously guaranteeing quality of service. Requirements for the PCS are derived from analysis of the threats to be countered. An overview of how the PCS works as transparent middleware enabling traditional facilities such as CORBA and DDS is also presented. The PCS provides transparent separation of data. Trustworthy separation minimizes certification risk when functions from multiple federated, stovepipe systems are integrated into a single distributed configuration to save size, weight, and power. The PCS also simplifies adoption of network-centric operations such as the global information grid View full abstract»

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  • An Airport Surface Wireless Network - Development & Pre-Deployment Experience

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 1 - 13
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (632 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The next generation air transportation systems (NGATS) test bed will be used to demonstrate, validate and experiment with transformational air traffic management (ATM) technologies and concepts. This is a cooperative effort between Sensis Corporation and NASA Glenn Research Center. The testbed will be deployed at NASA Glenn and the Cleveland Hopkins, Burke Lakefront, and Lorraine County airports. An airport surface wireless network is part of the core infrastructure for the testbed. The objectives for the wireless network are to gain experience with wireless infrastructure in an airport surface environment. Challenges include identifying and utilizing node sites that provide sufficient coverage, and overcome link obstacles ranging from buildings to moving aircraft. This is also an opportunity to explore many multifaceted tradeoffs including spectrum allocation, channel structure, network capacity, application diversity and system cost. Commercial off the shelf (COTS) products will be used to implement the wireless networks. System deployment will include physical installation, network configuration and integration with a multilateration surface surveillance system. Initial network performance will be evaluated with both real and simulated traffic. Key performance parameters include network capacity, latency, packet loss, and link error performance. Mesh network link failover time is also critical. This paper describes the testbed network implementation and experience during the initial development and early integration in preparation for network deployment. NOTE: There are many acronyms used in this paper, see the appendix for definitions View full abstract»

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  • Newsky - A Concept for Networking the Sky for Civil Aeronautical Communications

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 1 - 6
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (493 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this paper, an overview of the NEWSKY project is given. This project is funded by the European Commission within the 6th framework program and starts in January 2007. The NEWSKY project is a feasibility study to clarify if it is possible to establish a heterogeneous network for aeronautical communications which is capable to integrate different communications systems as well as different applications into a single global aeronautical network. The envisaged applications comprise not only air-traffic control and management but also airline and passenger communications View full abstract»

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  • Advanced Aircraft Performance Modeling for ATM: BADA 4.0 Results

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 1 - 12
    Cited by:  Papers (2)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (349 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A more predictable air traffic management (ATM) based on automation requires a precise trajectory computation infrastructure (TCI). The predicted trajectories are not only the result of its trajectory integration capabilities, but also depend on the input obtained from the associated aircraft performance model (APM), the operational instructions defining each trajectory, and the weather data. The APM is the core of the trajectory computation process and as such plays a critical role in the resulting capabilities of any future ATM system. EUROCONTROL Experimental Centre (EEC) conducts a number of activities in the domain of APMs, which are performed within the scope of base of aircraft data (BADA). EEC is supported by Boeing Research & Technology Europe (BR&TE) in the definition, development, implementation, and evaluation of an advanced three degrees of freedom APM suitable for the stringent requirements of future trajectory prediction tools. This new APM becomes version 4.0 of BADA, released and maintained by EEC. BADA 4.0 provides expressions for aircraft drag, thrust, and fuel consumption. It represents a significant improvement over current APMs for its high accuracy, its applicability to all types of power plants (jets, turboprops, and piston engines), its validity in the entire flight envelope, and the inclusion of non clean aerodynamic configurations. Additional features include the accurate modeling of the different power plant ratings, the existence of a limitations model to guarantee a proper usage within the flight envelope, the use of a precise atmospheric model that includes possible temperature and pressure differentials over the international standard atmosphere (ISA), and its modern architecture that results in reasonable complexity, maintainability, and computing requirements. This paper describes the different elements involved in the trajectory computation process, with emphasis in the APM as the essential component. It contains an overv- - iew of the BADA 4.0 APM, describing its different modules, and provides examples of the achieved results, both in terms of the error with respect to the reference data, as well as the shape of the identified models. A new trajectory engine (TE) capable of exploiting all the BADA 4.0 features is currently being developed. Preliminary results showing some of its capabilities are presented View full abstract»

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  • Development of Key Performance Indicators for Trajectory Prediction Accuracy

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 1 - 11
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (308 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Key performance indicators (KPI) for trajectory prediction accuracy were developed by applying factor analysis to a wider set of accuracy metrics obtained from a literature search. A Monte-Carlo simulation was conducted under operationally-representative conditions to provide a data set for the analysis. It is shown that the derived KPI can be linearly combined to estimate the larger set of metrics. These estimates provide good rank correlation with the actual metrics computed. KPIs can describe both the accuracy of trajectory prediction in addition to the quality of the input data supplied to a trajectory predictor. Various applications of these KPI are discussed including the specification of requirements on prediction performance. While certain KPI are described in this study, various values could have been selected. It is argued that TP KPIs should be made consistent with measurements used to express vertical and longitudinal RNP as those get defined View full abstract»

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  • Agent-Based Assessment of Trajectory-Oriented Operations with Limited Delegation

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 1 - 11
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (308 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    An evolutionary concept called "trajectory-oriented operations with limited delegation" is the subject of a preliminary assessment conducted using fast-time simulations with computational agents that represent air traffic controllers. The concept integrates technologies relevant to the next generation air transportation system (NGATS) and holds promise for efficiency gains by enabling aircraft to fly continuous descent approaches (CDAs). The assessment focuses on how controller strategies and automation tools impact CDA operations. The results indicate the concept represents an advance toward higher-efficiency NGATS operations, and emphasize the importance of shared information and air traffic controller decision support tools View full abstract»

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  • 4D FMS for Increasing Efficiency of TMA Operations

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 1 - 8
    Cited by:  Papers (6)  |  Patents (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (797 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In order to meet the anticipated future demand for air travel, DLR's Institute of Flight Guidance is investigating distributed air-ground traffic management (DAG-TM) for arrivals in the extended TMA. Based on the exchange of information between aircraft and ATC via data link, a trajectory based traffic management can take into account user preferred trajectories as well as make use of highly accurate prediction of aircraft movements. This contribution focuses on the airborne part - in particular on the 4D FMS functions for planning and flying various types of CDA approaches. The planning functions to compute approach profiles ranging from 2 degree (clean configuration) up to steep slopes (more than 5 degree) with early configuration and glide path intersection from above are presented. Furthermore, functions to compensate deviations due to inaccurately forecasted wind are described. These functions ensure flying the predicted flight path. The new CDA functionalities have been implemented in DLR's 4D capable advanced flight management system (AFMS) and intensively tested during various flight trials in the A330 full flight simulator in Berlin and with DLR's test aircraft ATTAS, a VFW 614 twin engine jet transport aircraft modified for research purposes. The results of these trials are presented and discussed View full abstract»

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  • Statistical Separation Standards for the Aircraft-Approach Process

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 1 - 13
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (354 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Demand for air transportation has been increasing. A response to this is enhancing the runway utilization and throughput before investing on new runways or instruments. Runway throughput can be increased by reducing in-trail landing separation between aircraft, but the consequence may be an increase in the chance of a severe wake vortex encounter or a simultaneous runway occupancy (or go-around). Current instrument flight rule (IFR) standards provide fixed separation minima for given pairs of wake vortex weight classes of aircraft. In practice, the observed separation is a random variable and fluctuates near or above the specified minimum. In this paper, we propose a framework for statistical separation standards that specifies not only a lower bound for the separation but also a standard for the target value and the variance of the process. We address the question of what a more efficient separation standard is in order to control the risk in the approach process. We also consider whether separation variability may be reduced by employing such standards, i.e. more detailed standards that take the "realized variability" into account. Analytical results of this study suggest that (under specific assumptions) throughput can be increased to some extent without degrading safety for the given facilities, infrastructure, and weather condition. The arguments and concepts are illustrated with statistical observations from Detroit airport (DTW) View full abstract»

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  • A Near-Term Arrival Management Operational Concept and Preliminary Considerations

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 1 - 10
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (316 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Boeing has developed an operational concept for air traffic management (ATM) for implementation in 2008-2012. The objective of this effort at Boeing is to define a significant achievable step improvement in the efficiency, capacity and affordability of the air traffic system for the 2008-2012 timeframe, while also enabling transition to the US next generation air traffic system (NGATS). The concept attempts to take maximum advantage of existing ground technologies and functionality. In addition, it leverages airborne navigational capability that already exists on most commercial production airplanes and many in-service airplanes. Consequently the concept is expected to require only modest changes to airplane systems and ground infrastructure. This paper describes the arrival management element of this concept, focused on the use of fully defined 3D paths to ensure aircraft sequencing and spacing, and discusses some preliminary performance considerations for the implementation of such a concept View full abstract»

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  • Performance of the Air Transportation System for the Atlanta - Chicago - O'Hare Route

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 1 - 10
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (266 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The goal of the air transportation system is to provide reliable, affordable, rapid transportation of people and goods. This service is achieved by the interaction between autonomous, distributed agents (e.g. airports, air traffic control and airlines) that operate under a high degree of uncertainty (e.g. weather, economy). As a consequence, the overall speed of and reliability of this mode of transportation is determined by the collective interaction between these agents and the impact of uncertainty in the system. This paper describes a methodology and the results of an analysis of the degree of uncertainty in trip time reliability on a single congested-hub to congested-hub route (Atlanta - Chicago O'Hare). The analysis identified that the actual gate-to-gate trip time varies by up to 30% of the average trip time. The analysis also identified systemic schedule padding of 16 minutes on this route, and statistically significant differences between the trip time in the summer, winter and fall/spring, between time-of-day, and between narrow-body and regional jets. The implications of these results on airlines strategies and passenger experience are discussed View full abstract»

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