By Topic

Global Software Engineering, 2006. ICGSE '06. International Conference on

Date 16-19 Oct. 2006

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 51
  • IEEE International Conference on Global Software Engineering - Cover

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): c1
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (1648 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • IEEE International Conference on Global Software Engineering - Title

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): i - iii
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (357 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • IEEE International Conference on Global Software Engineering - Copyright

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): iv
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (52 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • IEEE International Conference on Global Software Engineering - Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): v - viii
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (339 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Welcome

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): ix
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (136 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Executive Committee

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): xi
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (583 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Conference organizers

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): xvi
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (29 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Program Committee Members

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): xvii
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (30 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Keynote Talks

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): xviii
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (812 KB)  

    Provides an abstract for each of the keynote presentations and a brief professional biography of each presenter. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Global Software Development Challenges: A Case Study on Temporal, Geographical and Socio-Cultural Distance

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 3 - 11
    Cited by:  Papers (41)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (119 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Global software development (GSD) is a phenomenon that is receiving considerable interest from companies all over the world. In GSD, stakeholders from different national and organizational cultures are involved in developing software and the many benefits include access to a large labour pool, cost advantage and round-the-clock development. However, GSD is technologically and organizationally complex and presents a variety of challenges to be managed by the software development team. In particular, temporal, geographical and socio-cultural distances impose problems not experienced in traditional systems development. In this paper, we present findings from a case study in which we explore the particular challenges associated with managing GSD. Our study also reveals some of the solutions that are used to deal with these challenges. We do so by empirical investigation at three US based GSD companies operating in Ireland. Based on qualitative interviews we present challenges related to temporal, geographical and socio-cultural distance View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Outsourcing Decisions and Models - Some Practical Considerations for Large Organizations

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 12 - 17
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (102 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Outsourcing has recently spurred broad discussions due to the relatively high failure rate of outsourced activities. To analyze how organizations can increase their success rate of outsourcing activities, the authors take a two-prong approach to the outsourcing decision and execution process, covering the "why" and "how to" outsource. To determine the optimal setup, the authors introduce six outsourcing dimensions, which trigger the decision process and the subsequent procurement and execution processes. Strategic and operational considerations as well as risk implications are further elaborated. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A Reference Model for Global Software Development: Findings from a Case Study

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 18 - 28
    Cited by:  Papers (11)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (748 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The purpose of this paper is to present a reference model for global software development, based on the results found in a case study conducted in two software development units from multinational organizations located in Brazil. A preliminary description of this model was originally published in 2004. In this paper, we present the reference model in detail, improving the description and discussing the factors that enable multinationals corporations to operate successfully across geographic and cultural boundaries. At the end, we also discuss a preliminary evaluation of the reference model usage View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Blocks and Enablers for Global Software Engineering Projects

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 29
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (124 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Global software engineering is of growing importance due to reasons of skills, load balancing, response time, local presence and efficiency. However, many GSE projects have run into roadblocks with severe performance impacts. Working in a global context obviously has advantages but also drawbacks. While the positive side accounts for time-zone effectiveness or reduced cost in various countries, we should not close our eyes in front of the severe disadvantages. In fact the business case is surely not a simple trade-off of different cost of engineering in different regions. Working in a globally distributed project means overheads for planning and managing people. It means language and cultural barriers. It creates jealousy between the more expensive engineers being afraid of loosing their jobs, while forced to train their much cheaper counterparts. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Project Management within Virtual Software Teams

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 33 - 42
    Cited by:  Papers (11)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (238 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    When implementing software development in a global environment, a popular strategy is the establishment of virtual teams. The objective of this paper is to examine the effective project management of this type of team. In the virtual team environment problems arise due to the collaborative nature of software development and the impact distance introduces. Distance specifically impacts coordination, visibility, communication and cooperation within a virtual team. In these circumstances the project management of a virtual team must be carried out in a different manner to that of a team in a single-site location. Results from this research highlighted six specific project management related areas that need to be addressed to facilitate successful virtual team operation. Organizational structure, risk management, infrastructure, process, conflict management and team structure and organization. Additional related areas are the sustained support of senior management and the provision of effective infrastructure View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Comparison of Selected Survey Instruments for Software Team Communication Research

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 43 - 54
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (254 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    One of the factors that influence task productivity is communication pertaining to task, resources, and organizational issues. The objective of this research is to explore the availability of validated survey instruments in the area of organizational and team communication and assess their applicability in software development team research. Based on past studies, we have selected six comprehensive instruments. This paper provides a brief summary of the instruments and the various dimensions that they cover. The instruments are classified using a Group Variable Classification System (GVCS - input-process - output - feedback) model for team research. As most of the instruments have been used in manufacturing or service environments in the past, these instruments need to be tailored for use in software team research. They can also be used as a basis for developing new instruments View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Cultural Differences in Temporal Perceptions and its Application to Running Efficient Global Software Teams

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 55 - 61
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (196 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Global software development has been found to be a difficult undertaking, in particular, when members of a single team are not co-located. Studies have looked at the impact of different cultural backgrounds, communication structures and temporal distance on the team's effectiveness. This research proposes to examine the impact of culturally based perceptions of time. A gap analysis is proposed to carry out this examination. The gap that will be measured is the gap between time-based attitudes and behavior in team unit A and team unit B where units A and B are part of the same team but are not co-located. These time-based attitudes and behavior will be compared to measures of team satisfaction and team effectiveness. A model of the impact of the temporal cultural differences and their effect on team performance is presented and the proposed research for testing this model is described View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Delegation in Virtual Team: the Moderating Effects of Team Maturity and Team Distance

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 62 - 68
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (184 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Virtual teams are becoming an important work structure in software development projects. However, a number of issues arise due to the complexity and newness of the virtual team context. One such issue relates to when and how team leaders should delegate authority and responsibility to the team. Previous studies have yielded conflicting results. This work aims to answer this question about delegation by investigating the moderating effects of team maturity and team distance on the relationship between leader delegation and team outcomes. A research model and specific propositions are presented. This paper provides useful insights for future virtual team leadership research and for organizations interested in developing virtual team leadership View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Requirements Engineering in Distributed Projects

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 69
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (139 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Due to its communication and collaborationintensive nature, processes of requirements engineering (RE) become one of the key challenges in distributed software development. The reality of distributed projects is that cross-functional stakeholder groups are tasked with specifying and managing requirements across cultural, time-zone and organizational boundaries. This creates an unique set of problems not only when an organization opens development centres across the world, but also when software development is a multi-organizational business affair. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Success of Offshore Relationships: Engineering team structures

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 73 - 82
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (227 KB)  

    According to a recent NASSCOM-McKinsey report, the top reasons of unsuccessful off-shoring include: Inadequate preparedness and execution by client, Low onsite team morale and support, Onshore-offshore coordination and Miscommunication and cultural issues. The structure of the offshore team has a bearing on each of these. This paper compares two offshore structuring models, one being, organizing exactly like the client team that is off-shoring and the other, structuring the team a matrix structure. Managers are constrained in the selection of an appropriate model due to a number of reasons. Considering the changing market dynamics in this industry, execution efficiency has to be improved which will require best utilization of competencies and alignment of global delivery teams. Thus it becomes very important for managers to consider various alternatives and try out structures that will let them make best use of their resources View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Managing Software Performance in the Globally Distributed Software Development Paradigm

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 83 - 91
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1080 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The information technology (IT) industry continues to lose close to GBP 45 billion each year as a result of under per forming applications. Our observations, while troubleshooting a number of projects on performance related issues, has been that the root cause for most of these problems lies in shortcomings at the requirements engineering, architecture and design or system integration testing phases of the software development lifecycle (SDLC). We attribute this to a lack of awareness on the basic principles of performance engineering in terms of the activities that need to be performed in this context and when and how in the SDLC should these be done. This problem is particularly accentuated in projects executed using the globally distributed software development model owing to the geographic dispersion of the development teams. This paper proposes an experience based methodology on how to manage the performance of an application that is developed under this radically new development paradigm View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • IT Application Assessment Model for Global Software Development

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 92 - 100
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (4357 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In the technology enabled globalizing world with shrinking margins, IT offshore outsourcing is a well established practice in global software development. This is in line with the strategy of focusing only on core businesses of the enterprises. Despite this increasingly popular trend, the initial expectations of cost reduction of offshore outsourcing are not realized. Typically many hidden costs, risks of transition, learning needs, communications overheads, setup-times, ramping up durations, scope creeps, government regulations, etc, are not taken into account in the initial estimation of the relationships. This leads to ineffective value realization of offshore outsourcing which can be avoided by precision in cost estimates that are sustainable in execution cycles. It is thus imperative to develop a structured, objective and consistent approach to determine cost and productivity of application offshore outsourcing engagements. Wipro Offshore Outsourcing Methodology (WQOM), described in this paper, specifies such an approach, taking a holistic view of the end to end process. The driver for the methodology has been the focus to build quality in the complete process, starting from, pre-sales till the life cycle of the relationship. This methodology has been developed by incorporating the experience, judgment, intuition and expertise of multiple experts who managed and were part of many successful long-term offshore-outsourcing engagements. It provides guidelines to practitioners and decision makers to estimate the cost of IT application offshore outsourcing which include application assessment and to plan transition and steady state productivity achievement in a predictable and systematic manner. The core of the methodology is Wipro Application Assessment Model (WAAM), which leads to a consistent, robust and experience based estimate of time required to transition the application to offshore and the offshore onsite resource mix to maintain the application during its - life. It facilitates the practitioners to recognize risks and optimal bidding View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Culture and Shared Understanding in Distributed Requirements Engineering

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 101 - 108
    Cited by:  Papers (7)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (176 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Developing requirements for large software systems requires continuous and effective coordination of tasks, resources, and people. Research in team cognition suggests that the traditional input-process-output model is insufficient for the level of coordination needed in the development of such large systems. Coordination in these projects is greatly affected by human and behavioural factors, relying on developers having a shared understanding of both the system and the project. In globally distributed projects cultural diversity poses interesting challenges to the team's ability to form a shared understanding since developers from different cultures have disparate problem-solving and communication processes. This paper discusses an ongoing study on how culture affects the efforts through which requirements engineers, along with other members of the development team, acquire a shared understanding of both the system requirements and other issues such as project organization and progress. This paper explains the study's theoretical framework and outlines the more specific questions explored View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Could Global Software Development Benefit from Agile Methods?

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 109 - 113
    Cited by:  Papers (15)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (198 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    At first glance, agile methods and global software development might seem incompatible. Agile methods stress continuous face-to-face communication, whereas communication has been reported as the biggest problem of global software development. One challenge to solve is how to apply agile practices in settings where continuous face-to-face interaction is missing. However, agile methods have been successfully used in distributed projects, indicating that they could benefit global software development. This paper discusses potential benefits and challenges of adopting agile methods in global software development. The literature on real industrial case studies reporting on experiences of using agile methods in distributed projects is still scarce. Therefore we suggest further research on the topic. We present our plans for research in companies using agile methods in their distributed projects. We also intend to test the use of agile principles in globally distributed student projects developing software for industrial clients View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Collaborative International Usability Testing: Moving from Document-based Reporting to Information Object Sharing

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 114 - 118
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (165 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Usability testing is an activity that has traditionally been carried out in specialized labs in a specific geographical location. As test subjects tend to be drawn from the community in which the lab is located, problems can occur in identifying design issues related to people in other countries. This paper examines Internet-based approaches to the execution of remote usability tests and the collection of general guidelines on usability design for specific communities. The collection and communication of such knowledge through Web-based communities is argued to be a better approach than the current report format of usability test communication View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Collaborative Software Engineering with a Digital Ecosystem

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 119 - 126
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (381 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Adaptation to changing requirements is one of the predominant challenges in distributed development. Software projects exceeding certain scales cannot be addressed by small-sized companies because of the incapability of meeting the financial guarantees and also because of staffing problems. In spite of their advantage of being more flexible, small companies when teaming up are usually overextended due to the overhead of communication and synchronization costs. A need emerges here for an infrastructure endorsing decomposability of software specifications and semi-automatic re-composition of the implemented components to satisfy the original requirements. This infrastructure facilitates a more efficient risk management due to the more finely grained specification. Such an infrastructure is presented here as a result of an ongoing research and implementation activity including real-world testing spanning several European countries and regions View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.