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e-Science and Grid Computing, 2006. e-Science '06. Second IEEE International Conference on

Date 4-6 Dec. 2006

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  • Second IEEE International Conference on e-Science and Grid Computing - Cover

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  • Second IEEE International Conference on e-Science and Grid Computing-Title

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  • Second IEEE International Conference on e-Science and Grid Computing-Copyright

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  • Second IEEE International Conference on e-Science and Grid Computing - TOC

    Page(s): v - xviii
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  • Welcome Message from Conference Chairs and Program Chairs

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  • e-Science 2006 Conference Organization

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  • Workshop Organizers

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  • Grid Enabling Data De-Duplication

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    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (205 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A Grid based implementation of a system for finding duplicates in large databases is described. The solution is scalable to many nodes and does not suffer the problems found in other implementations that can result of loss of data and/or deadlock. The system may be applied to conventional de-duplication problems such as found in address management as well as more advanced problems such as banned image detection. The system uses the AURA pattern match methods implemented within a service oriented architecture. The approach builds on the PMS and PMC technology developed in the DAME eScience project. View full abstract»

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  • Grid Based Flood Prediction Virtual Organization

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    The topic of natural disaster management -- prediction, prevention, or minimization of their impact is an important topic for scientific research. The advances in computer simulation and highperformance computing in recent years have highly extended the possibilities in this field, and have changed the ways in which natural disaster management systems operate. This paper describes evolution of one such system -- a flood prediction application. The application consists of a set of simulation models, visualization tools, and various support components. During past six years it has evolved from a simple hydraulic modeling scenario into a sophisticated cascade of simulations, using state-of-the art grid, workflow and knowledge management technologies, and is one of the first applications of the SOKU [1]concept in the field of computer simulations. View full abstract»

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  • Designing Workflow Components for e-Science

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    In this paper we present a general domain for the analysis of workflows and workflow components based on the notion of a collection of Turing machines sharing a set of tapes. We show that computationally equivalent workflows can be evaluated in terms of two dimensions: data complexity and process complexity. We show that this approach allows for the evaluation of various workflow architectures. Using this formal framework we prove that maximal simplicity, generality and consistency are mutually exclusive. Simplicity of and generality of workflow components leads to complexity of data structures and computational processes. This is an issue that deserves more attention from designers and users of workflow communication protocols. We define a formal version of the General Workflow Design Problem and show that this problem is decidable in the case of a finite number of topologies. Thus, automatic composition of workflows is possible in limited domains. Decidability for an infinite number of topologies remains an open question. We show how our findings from the formal framework manifest themselves in real world e-Science workflow environments. View full abstract»

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  • VLE-WFBus: A Scientific Workflow Bus for Multi e-Science Domains

    Page(s): 11
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    In e-Science, a Grid environment enables data and computing intensive tasks and provides a new supporting infrastructure for scientific experiments. Scientific workflow management systems (SWMS) hide the integration details among Grid resources and allow scientists to prototype an experimental computing system at a high level of abstraction. However, the development of an effective SWMS requires profound knowledge on both application domains and the network programming, and is often time consuming and domain specific. Integrating mature implementations of domain specific SWMS improves reusability of workflow resources and promotes a generic framework for different e-Science domains. In this paper, we discuss different options to derive a generic workflow management system from domain specific implementations, and propose a workflow bus based solution, called VLE-WFBus. Legacy SWMSs are wrapped as federated components and are loosely coupled as one workflow system via a runtime infrastructure. An agent based prototype is presented; the integration among different workflow management systems has been demonstrated. View full abstract»

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  • Semantic Composition of Scientific Workflows Based on the Petri Nets Formalism

    Page(s): 12
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    The idea of an application described through its workflow is becoming popular in the Grid community as a natural method of functional decomposition of an application. It shows all the important dependencies as a set of connections of data flow and/or control flow. As scientific workflows grow in size and complexity, a tool to assist end users is becoming necessary. In this paper we describe the formal basis, design and implementation of such a tool -- an assistant which analyzes user requirements regarding application results and works with information registries that provide information on resources available in the Grid. The Workflow Composition Tool (WCT) provides the functionality of automatic workflow construction based on the process of semantic service discovery and matchmaking. It uses a well-designed construction algorithm together with specific heuristics in order to provide useful solutions for application users. View full abstract»

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  • Using High-Level Petri Nets for Hierarchical Grid Workflows

    Page(s): 13
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    An increasingly popular application programming model for Grids is to deploy often-used functionalities as remote services on high-performance hosts, following the principles of a service-oriented architecture. Complex applications are created by using several services and specifying a workflow between them. We discuss how workflows of Grid applications can be described easily as High-Level Petri Nets (HLPN), in order to orchestrate and execute distributed applications on the Grid automatically. In order to simplify the handling of complex and large-scale workflows, we introduce hierarchical Grid workflows, making use of the Petri Net refinement paradigm that allows to represent sub-workflows by single graph elements. We show how a complex application, the Barnes-Hut algorithm for N-Body simulation can be expressed as a hierarchical HLPN, using our platform-independent, XML-based Grid Workflow Description Language (GWorkflowDL). We discuss how the GWorkflowDL can be adapted to current Grid technologies, in particular to Java/RMI and the recent WSRF framework. View full abstract»

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  • Managing Large-Scale Workflow Execution from Resource Provisioning to Provenance Tracking: The CyberShake Example

    Page(s): 14
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    This paper discusses the process of building an environment where large-scale, complex, scientific analysis can be scheduled onto a heterogeneous collection of computational and storage resources. The example application is the Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC) CyberShake project, an analysis designed to compute probabilistic seismic hazard curves for sites in the Los Angeles area. We explain which software tools were used to build to the system, describe their functionality and interactions. We show the results of running the CyberShake analysis that included over 250,000 jobs using resources available through SCEC and the TeraGrid. View full abstract»

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  • K-WfGrid Distributed Monitoring and Performance Analysis Services for Workflows in the Grid

    Page(s): 15
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (570 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Grid workflows for e-science are complex and prone to failures. However, there is a lack of performance monitoring and analysis tools for supporting the user as well as workflow middleware to monitor and understand the performance of complex interactions among Grid applications, middleware and resources involved in workflow executions. In this paper, we present a novel integrated environment which supports online performance monitoring and analysis of service-oriented workflows. Performance monitoring and analysis of Grid workflows and infrastructure is conducted through a Web portal. Performance overheads of Grid workflows are analyzed in a systematic way, and performance problems can be detected during runtime. Moreover, we present several languages that alleviate the interaction among performance monitoring and analysis services and their clients. Our system has been integrated into the K-WfGrid knowledge-based workflow system. It plays a key role in supporting the user and developer to analyze their workflows and in providing performance knowledge for constructing and executing workflows. View full abstract»

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  • Grid Organizational Memory: A Versatile Solution for Ontology Management in the Grid

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    Recent developments in the field of Grid computing reveal the strong need of managing metadata on much higher level than it used to be done previously. Standard solutions like MDS provide relatively efficient means of managing Grid resources on a low level basis, usually available for Grid experts and simple search tools. However in order to manage resources among multiple Virtual Organizations composed of highly heterogeneous entities, joining and leaving the Grid in a dynamic manner, a more flexible way of describing and managing their resources is required. In this paper, a solution to this problem based on ontologies and distributed knowledge base is presented. The knowledge base distributed architecture is discussed with the flexibility and fault-tolerance outlined. The performance evaluation for typical use cases shows, that ontology separation and various configurations of GOM make it useful for managing knowledge in multiple domains. View full abstract»

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  • Workflow-Driven Ontologies: An Earth Sciences Case Study

    Page(s): 17
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    A goal of the Geosciences Network (GEON) is to develop cyber-infrastructure that will allow earth scientists to discover access, integrate and disseminate knowledge in distributed environments such as the Web, changing the way in which research is conducted. The earth sciences community has begun the complex task of creating ontologies to support this effort. A challenge is to coalesce the needs of the earth scientists, who wish to capture knowledge in a particular discipline through the ontology, with the need to leverage the knowledge to support technology that will facilitate computation, for example, by helping the composition of services. This paper describes an approach for defining workflow-driven ontologies that capture classes and relationships from domain experts and use that knowledge to support composition of services. To demonstrate the capability afforded by this type of ontology, the paper presents examples of workflow specifications generated from a workflow-driven ontology that has been defined for representing knowledge about gravity data. View full abstract»

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  • Kalipy: A Tool for Online Performance Analysis of Grid Workflows through Event Correlation

    Page(s): 18
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (361 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Static scheduling and execution of Grid workflows is prone to severe performance losses due to inaccurate predictions or the dynamic nature of the Grid environment. In this paper we present an online tool for analysing the performance overheads that appear during the real-time execution of workflow applications in Grid environments. We employ event correlation techniques and a distributed superpeer architecture in which each peer correlates local lowlevel activity and middleware events to infer performance overheads related to larger workflow regions at a higher level of abstraction. The rule-based correlation technique provides full extensibility to our approach that requires no source code modification. We demonstrate the functionality of our tool through online performance analysis of a real-world workflow application executed in a Grid environment. We present automatically generated online graphs of correlated events that promptly signal to the end-users the real reasons of run-time performance overheads in their executions. View full abstract»

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  • Interactive Workflows in a Virtual Laboratory for e-Bioscience: The SigWin-Detector Tool for Gene Expression Analysis

    Page(s): 19
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    Explorative research is a vital part of biological sciences. Biologists frequently have to examine and compare multiple (large) sets of biological data in an interactive and explorative manner. Exploring alternative ways of examining the data and managing the necessary resources often require substantial (manual) effort and time. In this paper, we present a concrete example of how VLAM, a grid-based workflow management system, can enhance experimentation. We discuss in detail the process of developing the SigWin-detector, an application in the domain of bioinformatics. We show that SigWin-detector can promptly identify regions of increased gene expression in transcriptome maps and periodicity in weather data. We also show that the workflow can be extended or partially modified. The individual modules can also be used to compose different experiments. SigWin-detector fulfills the requirements of interactive and explorative experimentation. View full abstract»

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  • Adapting and Evaluating Commercial Workflow Engines for e-Science

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    Numerous Grid workflow engines exist, each generally specialized for a single application domain such as protein folding. Although the underlying purpose and functionality of the Grid workflow engines are similar, and they make use of a common set of Grid protocols, the implementations vary vastly, making interoperation among them nearly impossible. On the other hand, the concept of workflows of Web services is very popular in the enterprise domain and many engines exist for business workflows. These mostly revolve around the Business Process Execution Language (BPEL), an emerging standard for Web services workflow description. We study three different business workflow engines - Microsoft's BizTalk Server, Microsoft's Windows Workflow Foundation and Oracle's Business Process Manager and analyze how each of these engines can be adapted to e-science and the Grid environment. We have implemented widely-used grid workflows on each of these engines and show quantitatively and qualitatively that each business engine has positive and negative aspects for large-scale e-science. View full abstract»

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  • Communication over a Secured Heterogeneous Grid with the GriddLeS Runtime Environment

    Page(s): 21
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    Scientific workflows are a powerful programming technique for specifying complex computations using a number of otherwise independent components. When used in a Grid environment, it is possible to build powerful "virtual applications" across multiple distributed and heterogeneous resources. Whilst toolkits such as Globus virtualize many system attributes, and thus make it easier to span different organizations, inconsistent security policies and resource heterogeneity can limit the applicability of workflow techniques. In earlier work, we have described a novel run time environment, GriddLeS, that supports flexible communication patterns between workflow components. GriddLeS abstracts IO operations, such that applications are given the illusion of operating on a local file system, whilst in fact they send and receive data between components. In this paper, we describe how GriddLeS assists in resolving some of the issues that arise due to heterogeneity in security policies and system architectures in a Grid environment. We illustrate the solution using a real world scientific workflow for climate modeling, and demonstrate a system that spans multiple conflicting security domains with heterogeneous resources. View full abstract»

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  • Supporting Decentralized, Security Focused Dynamic Virtual Organizations across the Grid

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    The ability to dynamically create and subsequently manage secure virtual organisations (VO) is one of the key challenges facing the Grid community. Existing approaches for establishing and managing VOs typically suffer from lack of fine grained security since they largely focus on public key infrastructures with statically defined access control lists, or they are based upon a centralised site for storage of VO specific security information. What is really needed is a federated model of security where sites are able to manage their own security information for their own institutional members, delegating where necessary to trusted local or remote entities, as well as defining and enforcing authorisation policies for their own resources. In this paper we present tools that support such capabilities and highlight how they have been applied to dynamically create and manage security focused VOs in the education domain. We believe that this federated VO security model for fine grained access to Grid services and resources should be the future model upon which security focused Grids are based. View full abstract»

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  • CROWN-ST: A Security and Trustworthiness Architecture for CROWN

    Page(s): 23
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    CROWN is a service-oriented grid computing middleware enabling resources integration in multiple heterogeneous domains and establishing dynamic cooperative relationship among researchers nationwide and worldwide. However, several security challenges should be addressed in CROWN due to the heterogeneous distribution of resources and the dynamic collaborations and resource sharing. In this paper, we present a security and trustworthiness architecture, CROWN-ST, for CROWN. The aim of this architecture is to provide a fine-grained and extensible framework for security and trustworthiness that enables employing distributed access control and dynamic trust establishment among service providers and consumers in a Grid environment. Based on this open and flexible architecture, a series of fundamental services which consist of secure communication, authentication, access control, credential federation, trust management and negotiation are implemented. Finally, comprehensive experimental studies are conducted to demonstrate the feasibility and performance of current CROWN-ST implementation. View full abstract»

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  • Domain Based Access Control Model for Distributed Collaborative Applications

    Page(s): 24
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    This paper describes the design and development of a flexible domain-based access control infrastructure for distributed Collaborative Environments. The paper proposes extensions to classical RBAC models to address typical problems and tasks in the distributed hierarchical resource organisation that came from the practical experience in developing industry oriented virtual laboratories infrastructure, particular: hierarchical resources policy administration, user roles management, dynamic security context and authorisation session management. The paper provides implementation details on the use of XACML for finegrained access control policy definition for domain based resources and roles organisation. The paper analyses the required functionality and suggests extensions to the major service-oriented access generic framework such as Acegi, Globus Toolkit Authorisation framework, and GAAA Authorisation framework in order to support complex resource organisation and collaboration scenarios in dynamic virtualised environments. The paper is based on experiences gained from the industry funded project Collaboratory.nl and other major Grid-based and Grid-oriented projects in collaborative applications and complex resource provisioning. View full abstract»

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  • A European Legal Approach to Grid Computing

    Page(s): 25
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    This paper presents a European legal approach to grid computing. In the absence of specific legislation regulating its legal status, we attempt to classify the different layers of grid computing (grid fabric, grid middleware and grid applications) by applying the relevant legal terminology to the nature (hardwaresoftware) and function (provision of services) of each layer. We suggest that grid services should be holistically considered as information society services for the purposes of applying the relevant regulatory framework. View full abstract»

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