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Modern Computing, 2006. JVA '06. IEEE John Vincent Atanasoff 2006 International Symposium on

Date 3-6 Oct. 2006

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  • IEEE John Vincent Atanasoff 2006 International Symposium on Modern Computing - Cover

    Page(s): c1
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  • IEEE John Vincent Atanasoff 2006 International Symposium on Modern Computing - Title

    Page(s): i - iii
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  • IEEE John Vincent Atanasoff 2006 International Symposium on Modern Computing - Copyright

    Page(s): iv
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  • IEEE John Vincent Atanasoff 2006 International Symposium on Modern Computing - Table of contents

    Page(s): v - vii
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  • Greetings from the General Chairs

    Page(s): viii
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  • Welcome from the Program Chair

    Page(s): ix
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  • Message from the Steering Committee Chair

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  • Symposium Committee

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  • Program Committee

    Page(s): xii
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  • Program Committee

    Page(s): xiii
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  • Symposium Organization

    Page(s): xv
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  • list-reviewer

    Page(s): xvi
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  • What Does It Mean To Be The First Computer?

    Page(s): 3 - 9
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (196 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    John Vincent Atanasoff has been called the father of the computer and his machine, the Atanasoff-Berry Computer, is known as the first electronic digital computer. This paper examines these statements, not from the point of view of the usual computer scientist, but from that of the professional historian. What does it mean to be first? Is it important to be first? On what basis is the claim made? What other devices might be considered to share this honor? We provide an historian's view of these questions and illustrate them with examples from the early history of computing machines. We hope these examples indicate that a professional historian looks at these questions differently than most View full abstract»

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  • The Quest for Linear Equation Solvers and the Invention of Electronic Digital Computing

    Page(s): 10 - 16
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    The task that motivated Atanasoff's construction of the first electronic digital computer has a mathematical legacy going back thousands of years, and it remains the fundamental operation by which computers are measured; solving systems of linear equations. This is sometimes misconstrued as a "special purpose" form of computing, but is actually as general in application as is any basic block of source code involving the four arithmetic operations +, -, times, and +. Systems built for this function share many architectural features; 70 years after Atanasoff conceived the ABC, ClearSpeed is building hardware for the solution of the exact same type of calculation, but trillions of times faster. The quest for linear solvers has motivated some of the most important innovations in computing history View full abstract»

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  • Indoor Positioning UsingWireless Local Area Networks

    Page(s): 17 - 26
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    Determining the context of users and machines is an important topic in current computing research. An essential detail of a physical object's context is its location, which includes both the actual position as well as the semantics of the surroundings. This paper focuses on the specific problem of determining the position of objects and people within buildings. A low-cost approach is based on wireless LANs, which are now widely deployed. The paper presents a sophisticated probabilistic algorithm for indoor positioning using wireless LANs, but also discusses the problems that need to be solved to make indoor geolocation commonplace View full abstract»

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  • Programming Models for Grid Applications and Systems: Requirements and Approaches

    Page(s): 27 - 32
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (136 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    History repeats itself. Since the invention of the programmable computer, numerous computer scientists keep dedicating their professional lives to the design of "the single, best" programming model, whereas programmers "vote" by choosing their favourite languages and tools. Interestingly, these choices have always been guided by non-functional properties. For programming a single computer, the most widely used models have become object-oriented and component-based programming, a choice driven by their high abstraction level, leading to high programmer productivity. For parallel computers, the winner turned out to be message passing, providing by far not the highest-possible abstraction level, but the closest match between machine architecture and programming model, leading to efficient program execution. For grids, the race is still open. Here, additional nonfunctional properties like fault-tolerance, security, and platform independence enter the scene. In this paper, we explore the scope of grid programming problems and argue for a palette of programming abstractions, each suitable for its respective problem domain View full abstract»

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  • A Scalable Autonomous Replica Management Framework for Grids

    Page(s): 33 - 40
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (364 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Data replication can reduce access time and improve fault tolerance and load balancing. Typical requirements for a replica management system include an upper bound on replica round trip time, scalability, reliability, self-management and self-organization, and ability to maintain consistency of mutable replicas. This article presents the design and a prototype implementation of a scalable, autonomous, service-oriented replica management framework for Globus Toolkit Version 4 using DKS. DKS is a structured peer-to-peer middleware. Grid nodes are integrated into a P2P network. The framework uses the ant metaphor and techniques of multiagent systems for collaborative replica selection. We propose also a complimentary "background" service that collects access statistics and optimizes replica placement based on access pattern and replica lifetimes statistics. We have tested and profiled the prototype View full abstract»

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  • Simulated Annealing for Grid Scheduling Problem

    Page(s): 41 - 45
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (245 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Grid computing is a form of distributed computing that involves coordinating and sharing computing, application, data storage or network resources across dynamic and geographically dispersed organizations. The goal of grid tasks scheduling is to achieve high system throughput and to match the application need with the available computing resources. This is matching of resources in a non-deterministically shared heterogeneous environment. The complexity of scheduling problem increases with the size of the grid and becomes highly difficult to solve effectively. To obtain good methods to solve this problem a new area of research is implemented. This area is based on developed heuristic techniques that provide an optimal or near optimal solution for large grids. In this paper we introduce a tasks scheduling algorithm for grid computing. The algorithm is based on simulated annealing method. The paper shows how to search for the best tasks scheduling for grid computing View full abstract»

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  • tilizing agent teams in grid resource management preliminary considerations

    Page(s): 46 - 50
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    Recently it was suggested that (mobile) software agents can provide an infrastructure for resource management in grids. In this note we introduce an approach based on agent teams, and discuss how it can he used in grid resource management. Details of initial implementation of one of its functionalities are discussed View full abstract»

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  • Dependability in Hybrid Grid Systems: A Virtual Clusters Approach

    Page(s): 52 - 57
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (306 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    With the rapid evolution of mobile and ubiquitous computing, small-scale devices like personal digital assistants, smart "converged" phones and laptops now dominate the market. Despite the parallel emergence of the grid as the new distributed computing infrastructure, an integrated hybrid grid system that consists of both traditional fixed nodes but mobile and limited devices as well, has only recently gained some popularity. One of the main challenges in realizing this integration is the very low levels of reliability and availability of small scale and mobile devices - a characteristic that could compromise the overall dependability and performance of the whole grid system. In this paper we try to identify the main dependability requirements for such a hybrid grid system. We then present our own approach to an efficient integration using our virtual clusters platform, and explain how we manage to meet the dependability requirements as set by our research View full abstract»

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  • Internet Revolution in Telecom

    Page(s): 58 - 62
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    The convergence of telecommunications, computing and content industries has been one of the major trends during the recent years. The convergence changes the digital service market from the existing vertical "pipes" to a more general horizontal structure. As a result of this development the integrated service-network-terminal connections is resolved into generic services available to multipurpose terminals through Internet. In this paper we consider the horizontal development, its effects on telecom services and, in particular, what the development would imply to the communications industry. We explain also why mobile services have been slow in horizontal development, and which disruptive points may drive this development in the mobile services value chain View full abstract»

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  • Some Extensions to the Multidimensional Data Model

    Page(s): 63 - 68
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    Business intelligence applications involve complex queries on very large databases. Users typically view the data as multidimensional data cubes. Computing multidimensional aggregates in large data cubes is a performance bottleneck for many OLAP applications. Calculating the answer of an aggregation query can be too expensive in terms of time and storage space. In this paper we describe some of the problems that can arise in the process of building multidimensional applications with Oracle OLAP Option. We pay a special attention to the sparsity of high dimensional data cubes. We present some extensions to the common multidimensional data model which could solve described problems. They also enable more flexible interface not only for the developer of OLAP application but for the end users too View full abstract»

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  • Features of Future Network Processor Architectures

    Page(s): 69 - 76
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    As network applications are becoming increasingly sophisticated and Internet traffic is getting heavier, future network processors must continue processing computation-intensive network applications at line rates. In this paper, we identify and describe in detail the specific computational features of network applications such as packet parallelism and dependency, the categorization and kernels of network applications, and the design issues for the next generation of network applications such as deep packet classification processing and security-related processing. We investigate the candidate baseline architectures of network processors to support the next generation of network applications, the desired cache and memory organization for these same applications, and how some packet dependency solutions require the processing of packets in a multiprocessor or a multithreaded environment View full abstract»

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  • UPerfsonarUI - a Standalone Graphical User Interface for Querying perfSONAR Services

    Page(s): 77 - 81
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (147 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Ensuring high-quality service from one end user to another, over multiple interconnected networks, is central to the aims and approach of GEANT2, the pan-European research and education network. In order to provide users with reliable and consistent performance monitoring data from multiple networks, GEANT2's performance measurement and monitoring joint research activity, in co-operation with Internet2 and ESnet, is developing a comprehensive network monitoring facility - perfSONAR. Within the framework of this activity, we have developed an open source, publicly accessible, easy to use, and yet powerful standalone graphical user interface client, capable of querying all available perfSONAR services and displaying the returned data in a concise manner. This paper gives a short overview of the existing state-of-the-art solutions, introduces the fundamental concepts of the perfSONAR infrastructure, and describes the design, implementation, and use cases of PerfsonarUI, while highlighting its main advantages. Possible future enhancements of PerfsonarUI are also outlined View full abstract»

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  • Arigatoni: A Simple Programmable Overlay Network

    Page(s): 82 - 91
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (277 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We design a lightweight overlay network, called Arigatoni, that is suitable to deploy the global computing paradigm over the Internet. Communications over the behavioral units of the model are performed by a simple communication protocol. Basic global computers can communicate by first registering to a brokering service and then by mutually asking and offering services, in a way that is reminiscent to Rapoport's "tit-for-tat" strategy of cooperation based on reciprocity. In the model, resources are encapsulated in the administrative domain in which they reside, and requests for resources located in another administrative domain traverse a broker-2-broker negotiation using classical PKI mechanisms. The model is suitable to fit with various global scenarios from classical P2P applications, like file sharing, or band-sharing, to more sophisticated grid applications, like remote and distributed big (and small) computations, to possible, futuristic real migrating computations. Indeed, our model fits some of the objectives suggested by the CoreGrid network of excellence, as described in Schwiegelshohn et al. (Schwiegelshohn et al., 2005) View full abstract»

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