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Software Specification and Design, 1991., Proceedings of the Sixth International Workshop on

Date 25-26 Oct. 1991

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Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 34
  • Proceedings of the Sixth International Workshop on Software Specification and Design (Cat. No.91TH0388-9)

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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Seven (plus or minus two) challenges for requirements research

    Page(s): 256 - 259
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    Requirements research has not had much effect in industry. A more appropriate research agenda would focus on several communication problems that plague requirements. Seven challenges are identified. All but one call for the development of improved methodology and enabling technologies rather than power tools or exotic languages View full abstract»

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  • A model for composite system design

    Page(s): 216 - 219
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    Composite systems are systems that encompass multiple agents involved in ongoing, interactive activities. The authors study requirements acquisition, specification and design of such systems. The research objective is a model that encompasses this entire design activity, and thereafter, techniques and tools called for by the model, which will serve to provide automated assistance to a skilled designer of composite systems. The authors outline the proposed model that they have established so far, together with the experimental pieces of technology that they are assembling View full abstract»

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  • Addressing requirements issues within a conceptual modeling environment

    Page(s): 212 - 215
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    The paper takes the position that research on how to formalize informal requirements information is not enough. One must actually identify what tasks the requirements analyst is undertaking, identify the types of knowledge that are being interrelated, and work out the desired relationships, or correspondences, between the various views. To do this, a conceptual modeling environment (ACME) is needed to define the various modeling viewpoints. An example is the definition of functional and architectural requirements and the assertion/retraction of design decisions that assign functions to components View full abstract»

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  • Developing reactive systems in a VDM framework

    Page(s): 130 - 139
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    The detailed validation of reactive systems, using an extension of VDM, is studied. The specification and proof of behavioural aspects is added to VDM by using traces of the input/output activities. The major objective of the work is to progress in the comprehension of the practical implications of the specification, design, and symbolic validation of machine-checked reactive systems View full abstract»

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  • Issues in the specification and design of parallel programs

    Page(s): 75 - 82
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    An overview is given of the main specification and design issues for parallel systems of programs from a software engineering perspective. A parallel system design approach based on the Large-Grain Data Flow 2 (LGDF2) computation model is outlined. An assessment of LGDF2 as the basis for unified specification, design, and implementation of parallel programs is given, along with a brief assessment of its potential impact on parallel software development and software project management View full abstract»

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  • Real-time specification and modeling with joint actions

    Page(s): 84 - 91
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    The notion of joint actions provides a natural execution model for a specification language, when temporal logic of actions is used for formal reasoning. The authors extend this basis with scheduling, the role of which is to enforce liveness properties and to introduce real-time properties. This is done in a way that agrees with the partial-order view of computations and can be applied already in early stages of specification and design. In scheduling principles this leads to distinction of total correctness, partial correctness and incorrectness with respect to liveness properties. A general scheduling policy is formulated that covers any reasonable scheduling as a special case. When this policy is totally correct and gives the required real-time properties, no special limitations are imposed on implementation. A refinement method is described by which a system can be transformed into a form for which this is true View full abstract»

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  • FUNSOFT nets: a Petri-net based software process modeling language

    Page(s): 175 - 184
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    Introduces an approach to software process modeling and analysis. It is based on describing software processes by FUNSOFT nets. FUNSOFT nets are high level Petri nets which are adapted to the application domain of software process modeling. Their semantics is defined by predicate/transition nets. That enables them to benefit from standard analysis techniques approved for predicate/transition nets View full abstract»

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  • Techniques for the design of communicating processes

    Page(s): 67 - 74
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    The last few years have seen the development of many parallel architectures. Among them distributed memory parallel computers seem to be very promising. The programming of these machines requires the design processes to be mapped onto nodes, communicating by message passing along the links of the architecture. The authors describe the rationalized design of such programs, by defining refinement techniques View full abstract»

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  • Advantages and limits of formal approaches for ultra-high dependability

    Page(s): 237 - 241
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    The paper discusses the advantages and limits of formal approaches to software development for achieving ultra-high dependability of critical computer systems. Among the issues addressed are: what is a formal specification? What can be done with it? What is correctness? What kind of certainty comes from a proof? And from testing? The paper does not claim to answer these questions: rather it is a formulation of the author's reflections and perplexities in this area View full abstract»

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  • PoliS: a programming model for multiple tuple spaces

    Page(s): 44 - 51
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    The class of parallel models and languages based on a shared associative data structure has aroused large interest. Among these languages, Linda is certainly well known. The author defines PoliS, a model of coordination based on the concept of multiple tuple spaces, a generalization of the Linda approach to parallel programming. The model introduces a programming method in which both space and time of computations can be specified and programmed, aiming at controlling coordination of distributed entities. The author discusses a parallel programming language based on this model and, as a meaningful application, the design of a programming environment based on PoliS View full abstract»

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  • Prototyping and formal analysis of concurrent and distributed systems

    Page(s): 60 - 66
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    The author sketches the specification language SEGRAS and illustrates related formal validation techniques with a few simple examples including a dynamic reconfiguration problem. The language is particularly suited for concurrent and distributed applications. It draws from two main sources: algebraic specifications of abstract data types and a special class of high-level Petri nets. The language is supported by an experimental specification environment whose semantic tools exploit the operational semantics of the language View full abstract»

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  • Goal-directed concept acquisition in requirements elicitation

    Page(s): 14 - 21
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    Requirements analysis includes an acquisition step where a global model for the specification of the system and its environment is elaborated. This model involves concepts that are usually not found in the final formal specification, such as goals to be achieved, agents and their responsibilities, etc. The authors present an approach for model acquisition which is driven by such goals. They describe a conceptual meta-model in terms of which requirements models are acquired. The acquisition strategy can be viewed as a systematic way to traversing this meta-model backwards from the goals. The goal-directed acquisition strategy and the use of the meta-model are illustrated with a case study, the specification of a simple elevator system View full abstract»

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  • Reuse of analogous specifications during requirements analysis

    Page(s): 220 - 223
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    Analogy is proposed as an alternative paradigm for specification reuse during requirements analysis. However, extensive analyst involvement is necessary to maximise analogical reuse across domains. An intelligent reuse advisor which supports analysts during the retrieval, understanding and customisation of complex specifications is proposed. Its design is based on cognitive models of analogical reasoning during software reuse derived from empirical studies of analytic behaviour View full abstract»

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  • Heterogeneous design idioms for software architecture

    Page(s): 158 - 165
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    Software designers use a variety of structural patterns to specify system architectures. These patterns, or idioms, are currently used informally and imprecisely. Nevertheless, they provide a useful, broadly shared vocabulary. In practice, a given design often relies on several patterns. The paper reviews some common architectural idioms, shows several ways in which they are used heterogeneously, and discusses the benefits of making these idioms and their combinations more explicit and precise View full abstract»

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  • A formal specification of a visual language editor

    Page(s): 120 - 129
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    A non-trivial case study is presented, on the use of the Larch specification languages to describe the Miro visual languages and graphical editor. In addition to excerpts from the specification, the authors discuss properties of Miro provable from the specification, limitations of Larch, and general lessons learned from this exercise View full abstract»

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  • Designing software for customization and evolution

    Page(s): 250 - 255
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    Writing software for several similar situations often involves writing a general purpose program for the domain, followed by customization appropriate for each situation. As domain understanding evolves, the general purpose program also evolves, leading to complications for the customized versions. The solution lies with the domain analysts and designers of the original system: they must characterize those domain aspects that require customization and those that are likely to evolve, and they must select design techniques that support both types of change View full abstract»

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  • Authoring-in-the-large: software engineering techniques for hypertext application design

    Page(s): 193 - 201
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    Discusses a structured approach to hypertext application design called authoring-in-the-large. This approach is based on the belief that in order to get a consistent, expressive, usable hypertext, the application should be first designed at a conceptual level in a system independent manner. The author should try to describe global properties of an application-its representation structures, navigational patterns, operational semantics, overall visualization and display aspects, before actually creating and filling in the nodes' content. In addition, the paper presents HDM-hypertext design model, a first attempt toward developing high level design primitives for describing static and dynamic aspects of hypertext applications from the authoring-in-the-large point of view View full abstract»

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  • Declarative specification and declarative programming

    Page(s): 2 - 11
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    A formalism for declarative specification and programming is introduced that forms a logical and methodological framework for program and system specification and construction. It combines axiomatic techniques based on logical concepts for specifying properties and the possibility to introduce names for objects. In particular it comprises within one formalism, the possibilities of formulating specifications and defining algorithms. The logical formalism is based more or less on typed predicate logic. The development rules are particular proof rules together with the inference rules of predicate logic. As a special aspect, the authors consider logical formulas which explicitly specify typed identifiers as elements of signatures View full abstract»

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  • Experiences using statecharts for a system requirements specification

    Page(s): 31 - 41
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    Some lessons learned and issues raised while building a system requirements specification for a real aircraft collision avoidance system using statecharts are described. Some enhancements to statecharts were necessary to model the complete system and a few notational changes were made to improve reviewability View full abstract»

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  • Telecommunication service description using state transition rules

    Page(s): 140 - 147
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    For telecommunication software design, SDL (R. Tinker et al., 1986) functional specification description language is conventionally used for specification descriptions. The authors clarify difficulties of SDL description for supplementary services, which allow a conversation among an infinite number of customers, and where there is considerable service interaction behavior. They also propose a telecommunication service description method, STR (state transition rule) method. In the proposed method, the service among an arbitrary number of customers can be defined easily, and declarative description is allowed for service interaction behavior in the early stage of software design. The authors clarify a feature of the proposed descriptions, that monotonic increase of transition rules realizes easy service addition. Lastly, the analyzability of the proposed descriptions is discussed View full abstract»

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  • Dealing with different time scales in formal specifications

    Page(s): 92 - 101
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    The authors motivate the need for allowing the consistent treatment of different time scales in formal specifications of time critical systems, with the purpose of enhancing the naturalness and practical usability of the notation. The approach to this issue is illustrated on TRIO, a temporal logic language for the specification of real-time systems. The authors briefly introduce TRIO and define an extension to the language which considers a temporal universe composed of various temporal domains of different time granularity. The semantics of the extended language is defined via translation mechanisms which allow one to interpret formulas referring to a larger time granularity in a finer temporal domain, and the main properties of such translations are discussed. Finally, a complete simple example of a system specified at various levels of granularity is presented View full abstract»

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  • Preconditions for understanding [formal specification]

    Page(s): 242 - 245
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    The author argues that advocates of a formal method have an obligation to explain the relationship between the role of proof in that method and the role of proof in others. Such comparisons are needed to (a) clarify the `method' behind a specific notation, (b) dispel misconceptions invited by the use of similar vocabulary with different meanings, and (c) suggest improvements to existing methods. These points are illustrated by comparing the use of preconditions in Z with that in other formal methods View full abstract»

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  • Abstraction and composition in Δ-specifications of concurrent systems

    Page(s): 52 - 59
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    An investigation is made of the application of the Δ-grammar graph rewriting model to the problem of specifying concurrent systems. The authors present abstraction and composition techniques for the Δ-model and illustrate their use through examples View full abstract»

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  • Swarming over the software barrier [parallel programming]

    Page(s): 233 - 236
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    Swarm is a concurrent programming model which integrates a Linda-like communication medium, the shared dataspace, with a UNITY-like computational model, proof system, and program structure. It generalizes the Linda tuple-space operations by providing more powerful dataspace queries. It generalizes UNITY by permitting content-based access to data, a dynamic set of statements, and the capability to control the execution mode (i.e. synchronous or asynchronous) for arbitrary collections of program statements View full abstract»

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