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Agile Manufacturing (Digest No.1995/179), IEE Colloquium on

Date 28 Mar 1996

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  • Agile manufacturing: a strategy for the 21st century

    Page(s): 1/1 - 1/6
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (292 KB)  

    Agility offers great potential for business growth. However, firms cannot afford to wait around to see if agility takes off or wait to learn from others' mistakes. Furthermore, there is no room here for scepticism and negative attitudes. A positive response is called for-attitude is a little thing that makes a big difference! No doubt, some aspects of the agility vision may not come to fruition-who can tell? Better to put aside reservations and to actively and positively engage in shaping the future, than to sit on the side lines watching what is happening, or even worse, wondering what is happening View full abstract»

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  • Agile manufacturing-the role of rapid response logistics

    Page(s): 4/1 - 4/3
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (164 KB)  

    As producers, manufacturers, wholesalers and retailers seek ever more effective ways of bringing products to market so they increasingly turn to examining their supply chains to find ways to reduce costs and investment, particularly in working capital. They also turn to time compression of their logistics to improve market responsiveness and avoid potential stock obsolescence. Today creation of the ideal logistics chain has stopped the traditional manufacturers stance of long low cost production runs for stock which is then called off when it is needed. Instead companies have now recut their logistics and production loading to respond rapidly to demand when either a consumer removes a product from the retailers shelf or decides to buy a new car. The UK is seen as world leader in this vital area of responsive logistics View full abstract»

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  • The ability to respond to peak seasonal demand

    Page(s): 2/1 - 2/6
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    Demand for soft drinks in the United Kingdom market is a highly seasonal business, with summer production being 2 to 4 times that of the winter months. The unpredictability ofthe British summer weather creates further challenges for the manufacturer, because a few hot days can have a dramatic effect on sales. Britvic Soft Drinks canning operation is one of the largest in Europe, and the factory must be able to run to meet both seasonality and the shorter-term, weather-related fluctuations. A number of practical examples are given to illustrate how agility is managed View full abstract»

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  • Agility is easy, but effective agile manufacturing is not

    Page(s): 3/1 - 3/4
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (204 KB)  

    The Iaccoca Institute in 1990 produced a paper in which they stated that the competitive environment was changing and that competitive advantage would be gained by those enterprises who are capable of responding rapidly to demand for highly customised, high quality products. The implication of this was that there would be a need to develop organisations and facilities which would be significantly more flexible and responsive than was then current. This requirement led to the concept of the “agile” as a differentiation from the “lean” organisation. This requirement for manufacturing to be able to respond to unique demands moves the balance back to the situation prior to the introduction of lean production, where manufacturing had to respond to whatever pressures were imposed on it, with the risks to cost and quality that this implies. The move to lean production, with its requirement for improvements in the support processes, has been a major task for many organisations to achieve. This paper discusses this balance between leanness and agility, questions how much agility is appropriate and how difficult might it be to achieve View full abstract»

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