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Enabling Technologies: Infrastructure for Collaborative Enterprises, 1995., Proceedings of the Fourth Workshop on

Date 20-22 April 1995

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Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 28
  • Author index

    Publication Year: 1995
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • User interaction with machines on the move: location aware computing

    Publication Year: 1995 , Page(s): 164 - 170
    Cited by:  Papers (1)  |  Patents (1)
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    The aim of current mobile computing systems is to hide the network as far as possible from applications. This paper introduces location aware computing which makes details of the networked computing environment explicitly available to applications. Depending upon where a user is located, and the capabilities of the machines around a user, applications will alter their behaviour. This will automate tasks such as logging-on, screen-locking and telephone re-routing and applications will automatically modify themselves to make best use of a user's computing environment. It is argued that a location aware computing system must address the three main issues of information gathering, data structure and querying and access control. Ideas within these areas are introduced and explained and the concepts of co-location and spheres of influence suggested as paradigms of person-machine interaction View full abstract»

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  • An ontology of quality for enterprise modelling

    Publication Year: 1995 , Page(s): 105 - 116
    Cited by:  Papers (7)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (960 KB)  

    The TOVE Quality Ontology is the formal representation (using first-order logic) of terms, relationships, and axioms about quality which are generic beyond any specific quality domain. The assumption that quality is “conformance to requirements” is used to decompose the domain of quality into sub-domains of measurement, quality analysis, identification, and traceability. An ontological engineering methodology of posing ontological scope, stating competency questions, constructing data models and axioms, and visualization of the answering of competency questions is demonstrated with an example from the engineering of the traceability ontology View full abstract»

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  • Subdocument invocation semantics in collaborative hyperdocuments

    Publication Year: 1995 , Page(s): 138 - 146
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    We informally explain a new Trellis model that incorporates colored tokens into the previously-described timed-Petri-net-based definition. We give examples of using Trellis to define protocols for Computer Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW). We then explain an interesting analog to procedure call we have developed for subdocument invocation in collaborative hyperdocuments. Trellis prototype implementations are based around a client-server architecture and interpret their specifications. Consequently they provide an environment for the rapid prototyping and incremental development of multi-user distributed protocols View full abstract»

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  • Infrastructure support for cooperative mobile environments

    Publication Year: 1995 , Page(s): 171 - 178
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    With the widespread use of distributed systems on one hand and the rapid deployment of mobile computing and communication infrastructure on the other, it becomes important to link both technologies together. This paper first outlines new problems arising from distributed mobile computing and then presents a software support architecture and system for mobile applications. We then discuss a system model for structuring mobile applications, a station software infrastructure for managing resource access in dynamic mobile environments, and a description technique for specifying behavioural aspects of mobile applications. The implementation is based on the remote procedure call of the OSF Distributed Computing Environment and on Microsoft RPC. First experiences with our prototype are reported and directions for future development are outlined View full abstract»

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  • Core services for coordination in concurrent engineering

    Publication Year: 1995 , Page(s): 189 - 198
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
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    Product development has increasingly become a cooperative endeavor that requires effective coordination in the face of complex dependencies over agents, time and functional perspectives. Distinct coordination support technologies have emerged for each of these kinds of distribution, but all face important limitations. This paper presents a unified model of concurrent engineering coordination that synergistically combines existing approaches in a way that avoids many of their individual limitations and combines their strengths. This model is based on an inclusive dependency capture language plus core coordination services for dependency capture, process enactment and exception handling. An initial implementation of this model is presented and challenges for future evolution of this technology are identified View full abstract»

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  • Personal Electronic Notebook with Sharing

    Publication Year: 1995 , Page(s): 88 - 94
    Cited by:  Papers (5)  |  Patents (17)
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    The concept of an electronic or digital engineering design notebook used by designers to capture information for re-use and sharing is becoming reality in many different flavors. Our development of PENS (Personal Electronic Notebook with Sharing) responds to observed designers' needs for a lightweight tool that is facile enough to compete with paper notebooks in functionality. As design information is entered into PENS in real-time, the PENS information web grows. As it grows, selections can be incrementally published for sharing with collaborators over the Internet's World-Wide Web. In an era where both network security concerns and distributed collaboration demands are growing together, PENS has the capability for firewall-independent sharing. To evaluate the utility of the PENS notebook concept, a prototype has been developed and used by 14 mechanical engineering design teams that span local and remote design partnerships View full abstract»

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  • Working group report on environments [program environments]

    Publication Year: 1995 , Page(s): 5 - 7
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
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    The group agreed that stand alone programs are “dead”, i.e., that modern programs should be expected to share data and functionality with other programs. Further, the “water level” for the amount of program interaction is rising as new environments become more sophisticated. The functionality that applications must share is increasing from sharing files, to object-based interaction, and beyond. Because of the rapid evolution of technologies for location-independent access, information exchange, and coordination, the group developed recommendations for funding sources, standards bodies, and environment and application developers. One general recommendation is that the subjects discussed by the group merit further study. Research, news groups, and conference discussions of standards/environment evolution were proposed. Funding sources are urged to adopt the standards model described here, promote multiple implementations early on, and then encourage coalescence of common features. Standards bodies are urged to consider the standardization of features that are already coalescing rather than to develop top-down standardizations far before the underlying processes are understood. Incremental, extensible standards are preferable to monolithic ones View full abstract»

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  • Information sharing of prosthetic parts CAD databases

    Publication Year: 1995 , Page(s): 82 - 87
    Cited by:  Patents (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (424 KB)  

    The paper describes the access to a database of prosthetic parts using an information sharing system. The prosthetic parts modeled are made of ceramic materials. The prosthetic parts are a femoral head, a cup, and a cup and head device. The information about the prosthetic parts is based on a feature based model and is stored in a relational database. The model for the information sharing system is object oriented. The relational database is accessed remotely from the object oriented model using gateways View full abstract»

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  • Process enactment support in a distributed environment

    Publication Year: 1995 , Page(s): 54 - 61
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
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    This paper proposes a conceptual framework and supporting architecture for general-purpose process modeling and enactment. The framework includes abstractions of all critical entities and their relationships needed to model complex tasks in a distributed environment. We are able to support multi-paradigm process descriptions, since the support system only sees process execution as operations executed by agents. We do, however support division and delegation of activities. The supporting architecture is based on industry-standard communication and distribution mechanisms (CORBA) in order to make the services available to a wide variety of computers, operating systems, and communication protocols. We propose a way to integrate process modelling and enaction with existing configuration management systems and other repositories responsible for the storage and management of the artifacts handled by the processes. Possible application areas for the proposed system include software engineering, other design processes, logistics control, office automation, and enhanced electronic communication View full abstract»

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  • A collaborative environment based on distributed object-oriented databases

    Publication Year: 1995 , Page(s): 95 - 104
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    The need for developing an open CAD environment has never been greater. One of the most critical problems involved in this is the integration of already existing CAD systems into a collaborative environment. Also, the resulting open CAD system has to deal with heterogeneous environments and various different data formats. We describe a collaborative working virtual prototyping (VP) environment which integrates already existing CAD systems. The underlying product model of the VP environment is a STEP (Standard for the Exchange and the Representation of Product Model Data) based integrated product model. The paper also describes how collaborative working is achieved in the VP environment using an object-oriented data management approach. The data management module is used to distribute data in the collaborative environment and to integrate both the system and data. Finally, the paper describes the concurrency requirements of the applications integrated into the VP environment and recommends a concurrency control protocol View full abstract»

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  • Working group report on process [production process workflow in cooperative virtual enterprises]

    Publication Year: 1995 , Page(s): 8 - 11
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    The process workgroup was given the task of studying the production process workflow in cooperative (virtual) enterprises, such as large software houses or companies needing concurrent engineering methods, e.g., for designing and making industrial products. We initiated our agenda by studying the main requirements of tools and environments which could entitle them to support production processes. In our vision, the main tools for supporting process design are descriptive notations for process modeling. Such notations should be formal, to help in understanding, analysing, and simulating the process models we describe. Our requirements for the environment were more vague: we envision an environment distributed on heterogeneous hardware, with a rich infrastructure of services, like distributed object databases and hypertext browsers like the WWW. More important, the environment should be able to “understand” the process model to be supported and enacted, i.e., it should be able to reconfigure itself, possibly dynamically, to support and enforce (“enact”) the workflow defined by the process model. The agenda we discussed included a survey of existing tools and notations for process modeling, which we summarize, an overview of research trends in the recent past, is outlined and, finally, a study of interesting scenarios and case studies worthy of being explored in the near future is discussed View full abstract»

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  • Preparing engineers for collaborative technology: a graduate course

    Publication Year: 1995 , Page(s): 214 - 220
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    How can we prepare engineers and other professionals to work in collaborative environments? In the 1994 Fall semester, we offered an interdisciplinary graduate course in collaborative technology to explore this question. The class involved a variety of different teaching/learning activities including: student debates, videos, guest discussants, software demos, field trips, and hands-on sessions. The primary evaluation mechanism for the class was a team project on collaborative technology View full abstract»

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  • MediaWare: a distributed multimedia environment with interoperability

    Publication Year: 1995 , Page(s): 128 - 137
    Cited by:  Patents (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (560 KB)  

    MediaWare is a distributed multimedia environment based on state-of-the-art distributed object computing standards as specified by CORBA. MediaWare enhances interoperability among media objects through the interoperable virtual connection protocol. MediaWare provides an infrastructure for building interactive multimedia applications that support synchronized, time-based media in a heterogeneous, distributed environment. This paper discusses MediaWare's architecture and its object life cycle. MediaWare's architecture includes an application layer; a quality-of-connection layer, which is an aggregation of the quality-of-service in addition to the user's interaction and synchronization requirements; an interoperable virtual connection protocol layer; an objects database including the interoperable database layer; an object request broker layer; an interface definition language (IDL) mapping layer; and finally, an object implementation layer. The paper includes examples to show MediaWare's power to generate several multimedia teleorchestrations and scenarios View full abstract»

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  • Web*-a technology to make information available on the Web

    Publication Year: 1995 , Page(s): 147 - 153
    Cited by:  Papers (3)  |  Patents (3)
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    The goal of the Information Sharing System (ISS) Project at the Concurrent Engineering Research Center (CERC) is to provide the means for an organization to effectively disseminate information. Thus enabling effective work in collaborative endeavors. Because corporate information exists in a variety of computer information repositories, such as databases, documents, drawings, and datafiles, it is imperative that these sources be integrated with an information sharing system to enable wider use. CERC's Web* (pronounced “WebStar”) software, currently released into the public domain, can be used to integrate multiple information sources. Web* allows the exploitation of the World-Wide Web and the CORBA environment View full abstract»

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  • An organisation ontology for enterprise modelling: preliminary concepts for linking structure and behaviour

    Publication Year: 1995 , Page(s): 71 - 81
    Cited by:  Papers (14)
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    The paper presents our preliminary exploration into an organisation ontology for the TOVE enterprise model. The ontology puts forward a number of conceptualizations for modeling organisations: agents, roles, positions, goals, communication, authority, commitment. Its primary focus has been in linking structure and behaviour through the concept of empowerment. Empowerment is the right of an organisation agent to perform status changing actions. This linkage is critical to the unification of enterprise models and their executability View full abstract»

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  • Collaborative IV&V by SPEED: a tool-kit for the performance IV&V of critical software

    Publication Year: 1995 , Page(s): 221 - 230
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    Software performance engineering is a software engineering methodology whose scope is continuing performance IV&V during the life cycle. SPEED (Software Performance Evaluation and Modeling) is a toolkit for software performance IV&V according to performance engineering criteria. It is in course of development at the Laboratory for Computer Science, and CERTIA Research Center University of Rome at TorVergata. In its present version, it generates and evaluates the Master Model of the product, a performance analysis model that continuously evolves with the product design, and that includes the software workload model and the abstract machine model, or model of the executing environment. Conventional analytical and hybrid simulation techniques can then be applied to the MM to obtain performance predictions for the product under design. The paper gives a description of the SPEED philosophy and architecture, with an accompanying application example of DBMS performance design View full abstract»

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  • Modeling the software process using coordination rules

    Publication Year: 1995 , Page(s): 46 - 53
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    Software Process Modeling is the activity of formalizing the production lifecycle of software systems. The aim is to formally describe a software development process, that then is effectively used and possibly enacted by an environment. We show that rule-based languages, especially logic programming languages, are an important technology for software process specification, modeling, enactment, and coordination. Because several process activities can be defined by rules. Some initial proposals aimed at animating a software process by a rule-based program embedding some development rules. A further step toward the integration of rule-based languages in the software process has be done using a dynamic knowledge base as project database, and a number of special primitives have been introduced to support process programs. Currently there is a trend toward more complex programming environments, called process-centered development environments. We show how some rule-based coordination languages are being used to build this kind of environment View full abstract»

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  • Investigating strong collaboration with the Annotated Egret Navigator

    Publication Year: 1995 , Page(s): 180 - 188
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    The Annotated Egret Navigator (AEN) is a system designed to support strong collaboration among a group as they cooperatively build, review, revise, and improve a structured hypertext document. AEN was used as the central instructional and research system for a graduate seminar on collaborative systems at the University of Hawaii during Fall, 1994. AEN was used for over 285 hours during the second half of the semester alone, and users generated over 800 nodes and 800 links. Lessons learned about strong collaboration include: (1) Users as well as artifacts should be visible; (2) Provide direct and indirect authoring mechanisms; (3) Provide context-sensitive change information; (4) Provide access to intermediate work products; (5) Maintain database integrity; (6) An agent-based architecture may be necessary for systems supporting strong collaboration; and (7) The WWW is not effective for strong collaboration View full abstract»

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  • Brokered collaborative infrastructure for CSCW

    Publication Year: 1995 , Page(s): 207 - 213
    Cited by:  Papers (1)  |  Patents (5)
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    We demonstrate the advantages of a distributed collaborative system for CSCW and highlight the requirements of brokered support for such a system. We also demonstrate how we have augmented the infrastructure of a prototype CSCW environment called SHASTRA to accommodate brokered collaboration. Several applications and possible scenarios of CSCW with brokered cooperative system are also presented. We describe how brokers can be used to exploit plurality and commonality of tasks in a cooperative setting, improving performance for the entire system View full abstract»

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  • Managing the resources of a portfolio of projects

    Publication Year: 1995 , Page(s): 62 - 69
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    The “Virtual Corporation”, as a better way of working, is supported by such visionaries as Tom Peters and Robert J. Kriegel. Organisations making a move to this configuration often suffer culture shock from having to change management style to cope with project management. More significantly, if an organisation is moving towards performing all of its functions using a project structure, it must learn to manage a portfolio of projects. The new corporate structure will have the majority of the workforce divided into project teams. If these neglect to adopt project planning and management procedures many projects will fail. However, if senior management neglect these in managing the entire portfolio of projects, the consequences are potentially catastrophic for the organisation. If an organisation gets it right, “Organisation by Project” is an efficient and highly motivating method of working in which project teams often achieve results that can surpass even the highest expectations View full abstract»

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  • Organization overviews and role management: inspiration for future desktop environments

    Publication Year: 1995 , Page(s): 14 - 22
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    In our exploration of future work environments for the World Bank we proposed two concepts. First, organization overviews provide a consistent support to present the results of a variety of manual or semi-automated searches. Second this view can be adapted or expanded for each class of users to finally map the multiple personal roles an individual has in an organization. After command line interfaces, graphical user interfaces, and the current “docu-centric” designs, a natural direction is towards a role-centered approach where we believe the emphasis is on the management of those multiple roles. Large visual overviews of the organization can be rapidly manipulated and zoomed in on to reveal the multiple roles each individual plays. Each role involves coordination with groups of people and accomplishment of tasks within a schedule View full abstract»

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  • Framework for business process redesign

    Publication Year: 1995 , Page(s): 36 - 45
    Cited by:  Papers (1)  |  Patents (1)
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    A framework based on high-level Petri nets is used to model and analyse business processes. This framework is a powerful tool to support business process reengineering efforts. The “What, how and by whom?” approach is introduced to guide the application of this Petri net based framework View full abstract»

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  • WET ICE tools working group report

    Publication Year: 1995 , Page(s): 2 - 4
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    The authors discuss: 1. Three scenarios that represent different situations for collaboration, 2. A framework that can be used to describe collaborative tools and, 3. Some concerns, issues, and holes we found View full abstract»

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  • Tool support for collaborative software prototyping

    Publication Year: 1995 , Page(s): 25 - 35
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    Prototyping is a means by which requirements for software projects can be defined and refined before they are committed to firm specifications for the finished software product. By this process, costly and time-consuming errors in specification can be avoided or minimized. Reconfiguration is the concept of altering the program code, bindings between program modules, or logical or physical distribution of software components while allowing the continuing execution of the software being changed. Combining these two notions suggests the potential for a development environment where requirements can be quickly and dynamically evolved. This paper discusses reconfiguration-based prototyping (RBP), that is, the simultaneous consideration of requirements, software behavior and user feedback within a running system in order to derive a clear specification of an intended product. Tools enabling RBP can coordinate the efforts of developers, users and subject matter specialists alike as they work toward consensus on an application's specification by means of a prototype View full abstract»

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