By Topic

Visualization, 1995. Visualization '95. Proceedings., IEEE Conference on

Date Oct. 29 1995-Nov. 3 1995

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 58
  • Index of Authors

    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (133 KB)  

    Presents an index of the authors whose papers are published in the conference. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Outstanding Contribution Certificate for the Founders of the IEEE Visualization Conference Series

    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (96 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Flow visualization in a hypersonic fin/ramp flow

    Page(s): 379 - 382, 478
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (768 KB)  

    A recent study of a flow detail of an engine intake of future ground to orbit transport systems provided extremely complex data from numerical flow simulation and experimental flow visualization. The data posed a challenging problem to flow visualization, computational flow imaging (CFI), and the comparison of experimental imaging techniques versus computational imaging techniques. Some new visualization techniques have been implemented to provide compact representations of the complex features in the data. It turned out to be most useful to combine various specialized techniques for an icon-like representation of phenomena in a single image in order to study interaction of flow features. Some lessons were learned by simulating experimental visualization techniques on the numerical data View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Propositional n-traces: visualizing a problem in philosophical logic

    Page(s): 338 - 341, 470
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (304 KB)  

    As part of an inter-disciplinary effort, we are visually exploring a current problem in philosophical logic related to information processing. Given a set of inconsistent sentences or inputs, a processor cannot unambiguously infer any specific consequence. Traces represent subsets of possible consequences which can be inferred classically from partitions of the set of inputs. We are interested in the relationship between a given set of Boolean inputs and its respective trace(s). We have developed a visualization paradigm which allows us to view and explore this relationship effectively View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Legibility enhancement for information visualisation

    Page(s): 209 - 216, 454
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (884 KB)  

    Navigation in computer generated information spaces may be difficult, resulting in users getting “lost in hyperspace”. This work aims to build on research from the area of city planning to try to solve this problem. We introduce the concepts of legibility and cognitive maps and the five features of urban landscape with which they are associated. Following this will be descriptions of techniques and algorithms which we have developed to allow these features to be introduced to three dimensional spaces for information visualisation. Next we describe a specific application of these techniques in the visualisation of the World Wide Web and conclude with a look at future development of the system View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Visualizing the tracking and diving behavior of marine mammals: a case study

    Page(s): 397 - 399, 482
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (608 KB)  

    A new method of tracking free ranging marine mammals has been developed which employs a Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver to accurately fix an animal's position when it surfaces and a tri axial magnetometer and velocity time depth recorder to track the animals underwater movements between surfacings in 3 dimensions. Concurrent with the development of the electronics of this movement and position tracking (MAP) tracking system has been the development of ways to analyze data from the MAP system. Spray rendering has been used to visualize the data and to combine it with environmental data allowing biologists view the animals activity in an environmental context. Considerable effort has been has been made to incorporate estimations of uncertainty and ways of minimizing it into our visualizations of the data View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Volume-based reasoning and visualization of diecastability

    Page(s): 359 - 362, 474
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (828 KB)  

    Because of the nature of the die casting process, the part geometry severely restricts the die geometry and hence affects the quality of the part. However, as is often the case in other manufacturing processes, diecastings are currently designed purely based on their function. The manufacturability of the diecastings is not considered until the design has been nearly completed and detailed. This is due to the design support limitations of current CAE tools. We present a new volume-based approach to support diecastability evaluation, especially in preliminary design. Our approach can be applied to arbitrarily shaped parts without pre-defined feature libraries. The focus is on the identification of geometric characteristics, e.g. heavy mass regions, that could be responsible for thermal-related part defects. A distance transform with city-block metric is used to extract this geometric property. Volume visualization techniques are also adopted to allow users to visualize the results in a clear and precise way View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Tensor product surfaces guided by minimal surface area triangulations

    Page(s): 254 - 261, 460
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (816 KB)  

    Presents a method for constructing tensor product Bezier surfaces from contour (cross-section) data. Minimal area triangulations are used to guide the surface construction, and the final surface reflects the optimality of the triangulation. The resulting surface differs from the initial triangulation in two important ways: it is smooth (as opposed to the piecewise planar triangulation), and it is in tensor product form (as opposed to the irregular triangular mesh). The surface reconstruction is efficient because we do not require an exact minimal surface. The triangulations are used as strong hints, but no more than that. The method requires the computation of both open and closed isoparametric curves of the surface, using triangulations as a guide. These isoparametric curves form a tensor product Bezier surface. We show how to control sampling density by filling and pruning isoparametric curves, for accuracy and economy. A rectangular grid of points is produced that is compatible with the expected format for a tensor product surface interpolation, so that a host of well-supported methods are available to generate and manipulate the surface View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Visualization of biological sequence similarity search results

    Page(s): 44 - 51, 437
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1984 KB)  

    Biological sequence similarity analysis presents visualization challenges, primarily because of the massive amounts of discrete, multi dimensional data. Genomic data generated by molecular biologists is analyzed by algorithms that search for similarity to known sequences in large genomic databases. The output from these algorithms can be several thousand pages of text, and is difficult to analyze because of its length and complexity. We developed and implemented a novel graphical representation for sequence similarity search results, which visually reveals features that are difficult to find in textual reports. The method opens new possibilities in the interpretation of this discrete, multidimensional data by enabling interactive investigation of the graphical representation View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Turbulent flow visualization in computational and experimental hydraulics

    Page(s): 388 - 391, 480
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (512 KB)  

    Many practical problems in open channel hydraulics that were traditionally investigated in hydraulic model experiments, are nowadays being solved by using computational fluid dynamics. However, in order to interpret computational results, there is a clear preference among scientists and engineers for visualization in analogy with experimental techniques. One such technique, particle tracing, enables a dynamic (Lagrangian) interpretation of a statically (Eulerian) computed vector field. However, quite often the emphasis in particle tracing is only on the mean flow properties, while effects due to dispersion and mixing are often not accounted for. Hence turbulent flow characteristics have to be incorporated in a visualization system for practical hydraulic engineering problems. The particle tracing technique presented in this case study has been specifically developed to combine both mean and fluctuating velocity vectors, thus simulating stochastic perturbations around mean flow conditions. A number of cases are presented that demonstrate the practical applicability of advanced visualization techniques in realistic engineering studies View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Voxel based object simplification

    Page(s): 296 - 303, 465
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1620 KB)  

    Presents a simple, robust and practical method for object simplification for applications where gradual elimination of high-frequency details is desired. This is accomplished by sampling and low-pass filtering the object into multi-resolution volume buffers and applying the marching cubes algorithm to generate a multi-resolution triangle-mesh hierarchy. Our method simplifies the genus of objects and can also help existing object simplification algorithms achieve better results. At each level of detail, a multi-layered mesh can be used for an optional and efficient antialiased rendering View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Interactive 3D visualization of actual anatomy and simulated chemical time-course data for fish

    Page(s): 393 - 396, 481
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (640 KB)  

    Outputs from a physiologically based toxicokinetic (PB-TK) model for fish were visualized by mapping time series data for specific tissues onto a three dimensional representation of a rainbow trout. The trout representation was generated in stepwise fashion: cross sectional images were obtained from an anesthetized fish using a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system; images were processed to classify tissue types; images were stacked and processed to create a three dimensional representation of the fish, encapsulating five volumes corresponding to the liver, kidney, muscle, gastrointestinal tract, and fat. Kinetic data for the disposition of pentachloroethane in trout were generated using a PB-TK model. Model outputs were mapped onto corresponding tissue volumes, representing chemical concentration as color intensity. The visualization was then animated, to show the accumulation of pentachloroethane in each tissue during a continuous branchial (gill) exposure View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Automated generation of visual simulation databases using remote sensing and GIS

    Page(s): 86 - 93, 442
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (980 KB)  

    This paper reports on the development of a strategy to generate databases used for real-time interactive landscape visualization. The database construction from real world data is intended to be as automated as possible. The primary sources of information are remote sensing imagery recorded by Landsat's Thematic Mapper (TM) and digital elevation models (DEM). Additional datasets (traffic networks and buildings) are added to extend the database. In a first step the TM images are geocoded and then segmented into areas of different land coverage. During the visual simulation highly detailed photo textures are applied onto the terrain based on the classification results to increase the apparent amount of detail. The data processing and integration is carried out using custom image processing and geographic information systems (GIS) software. Finally, a sample visual simulation application is implemented. Emphasis is put on practical implementation to test the feasibility of the approach as a whole View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Recursive pattern: a technique for visualizing very large amounts of data

    Page(s): 279 - 286, 463
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1380 KB)  

    An important goal of visualization technology is to support the exploration and analysis of very large amounts of data. In this paper, we propose a new visualization technique called a `recursive pattern', which has been developed for visualizing large amounts of multidimensional data. The technique is based on a generic recursive scheme which generalizes a wide range of pixel-oriented arrangements for displaying large data sets. By instantiating the technique with adequate data- and application-dependent parameters, the user may greatly influence the structure of the resulting visualizations. Since the technique uses one pixel for presenting each data value, the amount of data which can be displayed is only limited by the resolution of current display technology and by the limitations of human perceptibility. Beside describing the basic idea of the `recursive pattern' technique, we provide several examples of useful parameter settings for the various recursion levels. We further show that our `recursive pattern' technique is particularly advantageous for the large class of data sets which have a natural order according to one dimension (e.g. time series data). We demonstrate the usefulness of our technique by using a stock market application View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Enhancing transparent skin surfaces with ridge and valley lines

    Page(s): 52 - 59, 438
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (936 KB)  

    There are many applications that can benefit from the simultaneous display of multiple layers of data. The objective in these cases is to render the layered surfaces in a such way that the outer structures can be seen and seen through at the same time. The paper focuses on the particular application of radiation therapy treatment planning, in which physicians need to understand the three dimensional distribution of radiation dose in the context of patient anatomy. We describe a promising technique for communicating the shape and position of the transparent skin surface while at the same time minimally occluding underlying isointensity dose surfaces and anatomical objects: adding a sparse, opaque texture comprised of a small set of carefully chosen lines. We explain the perceptual motivation for explicitly drawing ridge and valley curves on a transparent surface, describe straightforward mathematical techniques for detecting and rendering these lines, and propose a small number of reasonably effective methods for selectively emphasizing the most perceptually relevant lines in the display View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Case study: using spatial access methods to support the visualization of environmental data

    Page(s): 400 - 403, 483
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1424 KB)  

    As part of a large effort evaluating the effect of the Exxon Valdez oil spill, we are using the spatial selection features of an object relational database management system to support the visualization of the ecological data. The effort, called the Sound Ecosystem Assessment project (SEA), is collecting and analyzing oceanographic and biological data from Prince William Sound in Alaska. To support visualization of the SEA data we are building a data management system which includes a spatial index over a bounding polygon for all of the datasets which are collected. In addition to other selection criteria the prototype provides several methods for selecting data within an arbitrary region. This case study presents the requirements and the implementation for the application prototype which combines visualization and database technology. The spatial indexing features of the Illustra object relational database management system are linked with the visualization capabilities of AVS to create an interactive environment for analysis of SEA data View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Marching through the Visible Man

    Page(s): 368 - 373, 476
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2172 KB)  

    The National Library of Medicine is creating a digital atlas of the human body. This project, called the Visible Human, has already produced computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and physical cross-sections of a human male cadaver. This paper describes a methodology and results for extracting surfaces from the Visible Male's CT data. We use surface connectivity and isosurface extraction techniques to create polygonal models of the skin, bone, muscle and bowels. We also report early experiments with the physical cross-sections View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Sweeping simplices: a fast iso-surface extraction algorithm for unstructured grids

    Page(s): 143 - 150, 447
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1064 KB)  

    Presents an algorithm that accelerates the extraction of iso-surfaces from unstructured grids by avoiding the traversal of the entire set of cells in the volume. The algorithm consists of a sweep algorithm and a data decomposition scheme. The sweep algorithm incrementally locates intersected elements, and the data decomposition scheme restricts the algorithm's worst-case performance. For data sets consisting of hundreds of thousands of elements, our algorithm can reduce the cell traversal time by more than 90% over the naive iso-surface extraction algorithm, thus facilitating interactive probing of scalar fields for large-scale problems on unstructured three-dimensional grids View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A visualization tool for studying the development of the moss Physcomitrella patens

    Page(s): 364 - 367, 475
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (652 KB)  

    The investigation of mechanisms responsible for the morphogenesis of complex biological organisms is an important area in biology. P. patens is an especially suitable plant for this research because it is a rather simple organism, facilitating its observation, yet it possesses developmental phenomena analogous to those which occur in higher plants, allowing the extrapolation of hypotheses to more complex organisms. The visualization consists of three components: biological data collection, computer-modelling (using L-systems), and model verification. The simulated developmental process is quite realistic and provides an excellent means for verifying the underlying hypotheses of morphogenesis View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Compression domain rendering of time-resolved volume data

    Page(s): 168 - 175, 450
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (860 KB)  

    An important challenge in the visualization of three-dimensional volume data is the efficient processing and rendering of time-resolved sequences. Only the use of compression techniques, which allow the reconstruction of the original domain from the compressed one locally, makes it possible to evaluate these sequences in their entirety. In this paper, a new approach for the extraction and visualization of so-called time features from within time-resolved volume data is presented. Based on the asymptotic decay of multiscale representations of spatially localized time evolutions of the data, singular points can be discriminated. Also, the corresponding Lipschitz exponents, which describe the signals' local regularity, can be determined, and can be taken as a measure of the variation in time. The compression ratio and the comprehension of the underlying signal is improved if we first restore the extracted regions which contain the most important information View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A hardware acceleration method for volumetric ray tracing

    Page(s): 27 - 34, 435
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1020 KB)  

    We present an acceleration method for volumetric ray tracing which utilizes standard graphics hardware without compromising image accuracy. The graphics hardware is employed to identify those segments of each ray that could possibly contribute to the final image. A volumetric ray tracing algorithm is then used to compute the final image, traversing only the identified segments of the rays. This technique can be used to render volumetric isosurfaces as well as translucent volumes. In addition, this method can accelerate the traversal of shadow rays when performing recursive ray tracing View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Iconic techniques for feature visualization

    Page(s): 288 - 295, 464
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1028 KB)  

    Presents a conceptual framework and a process model for feature extraction and iconic visualization. Feature extraction is viewed as a process of data abstraction, which can proceed in multiple stages, and corresponding data abstraction levels. The features are represented by attribute sets, which play a key role in the visualization process. Icons are symbolic parametric objects, designed as visual representations of features. The attributes are mapped to the parameters (or degrees of freedom) of an icon. We describe some generic techniques to generate attribute sets, such as volume integrals and medial axis transforms. A simple but powerful modeling language was developed to create icons, and to link the attributes to the icon parameters. We present illustrative examples of iconic visualization created with the techniques described, showing the effectiveness of this approach View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • On enhancing the speed of splatting with indexing

    Page(s): 69 - 76, 441
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (692 KB)  

    Splatting is an object space direct volume rendering algorithm that produces images of high quality, but is computationally expensive like many other volume rendering algorithms. The paper presents a new technique that enhances the speed of splatting without trading off image quality. This new method reduces rendering time by employing a simple indexing mechanism which allows to visit and splat only the voxels of interest. It is shown that this algorithm is suitable for the dynamic situation in which viewing parameters and opacity transfer functions change interactively. We report experimental results on several test data sets of useful site and complexity, and discuss the cost/benefit trade off of our method View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • High-speed volume rendering using redundant block compression

    Page(s): 176 - 183, 451
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1220 KB)  

    Presents a novel volume rendering method which offers high rendering speed on standard workstations. It is based on a lossy data compression scheme which drastically reduces the memory bandwidth and computing requirements of perspective raycasting. Starting from classified and shaded data sets, we use block truncation coding or color cell compression to compress a block of 12 voxels into 32 bits. All blocks of the data set are processed redundantly, yielding a data structure which avoids multiple memory accesses per raypoint. As a side effect, the tri-linear interpolation of data coded in such a way is very much simplified. These techniques allow us to perform walkthroughs at interactive frame rates. Furthermore, the algorithm provides depth-cueing and the semi-transparent display of different materials. The algorithm achieves a sustained frame generation rate of about 2 Hz for large data sets (~2003) at an acceptable image quality on an SGI Indy workstation. A number of examples are shown View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.