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Computer-Aided Software Engineering, 1995. Proceedings., Seventh International Workshop on

Date 10-14 July 1995

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Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 41
  • Proceedings Seventh International Workshop on Computer-Aided Software Engineering

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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Computer-aided sub-processes (CASPs): a practical approach to the use of CASE technology to support process improvement

    Page(s): 20 - 28
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    To improve software engineering practice some people advocate a process improvement approach, while others promote increased use of tools and technology. This paper discusses the relationship between a process-oriented and technology-oriented approach to software improvement. The notion of a computer-aided sub-process (CASP) is advanced as a way of reconciling these views. The CASP approach is described, and illustrated with reference to an existing use of the CASP approach in an industrial setting View full abstract»

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  • Generating user interfaces from specifications produced by a reverse engineering process

    Page(s): 296 - 302
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    A framework for automatic graphical user interface code generation is developed. Tools to support this framework are built: a parser, generation rules, and target code production. The parser reads specifications resulted from a reverse engineering process of a character-oriented user interface. These specifications are written in a language called AUIDL (Abstract User Interface Description Language). This language is based on the object-oriented paradigm, which means the use of class, object, attributes and methods. The methods are used to describe the behaviour of the user interface. The resulted graphical user interface is translated into a language called EASEL, which is also an object-oriented graphical language that allows an IBM/PC to communicate with an IBM mainframe via a 3270 terminal emulator. Directions for further research are also presented View full abstract»

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  • Lessons learned by building and using Scrutiny, a collaborative software inspection system

    Page(s): 350 - 357
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    This is an experience report describing the results of a project to build and introduce an experimental CASE tool into a software engineering organization. The tool is Scrutiny, a CSCW system used to manage and facilitate the performance of software inspection and review by geographically separated teams. We describe Scrutiny and the lessons learned while building it and introducing it. The lessons learned are characterized as tool introduction, process, and user interface issues View full abstract»

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  • Modeling N-ary data relationships in CASE environments

    Page(s): 132 - 140
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    An extended approach is presented for modeling data relationships that involve multiple entities. This approach unifies the different relationship cardinality values defined by existing approaches into a common framework and extends the types of values captured. A concise tabular notation for specifying such values is introduced. The result is a modeling technique that captures more completely the nature of data relationships. We define a set of rules for identifying inconsistencies within the definition of a given data relationship and indicate how these rules can be applied within CASE tools for data modeling. We conclude that our extended approach together with appropriate automated support can aid in modeling complex data relationships View full abstract»

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  • Domain modeling for software reuse and evolution

    Page(s): 162 - 171
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    This paper describes a prototype domain modeling environment used to demonstrate the concepts of reuse of software requirements and software architectures. The environment, which is application-domain independent, is used to support the development of domain models and to generate target system specifications from them. The prototype environment consists of an integrated set of commercial-off-the-shelf software tools and custom developed software tools View full abstract»

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  • Supporting the domain lifecycle [CASE adoption]

    Page(s): 10 - 19
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    CASE tools are notorious for forcing organizations to adapt to a standard development methodology. The underlying assumption is that a universally applicable development method exists and it is up to the organization to conform to that method. But software development is no longer a homogeneous field. As computers are applied to an increasingly diverse set of applications, it is becoming increasingly important to understand the different demands these domains place on the development process. Our solution to this dilemma is to create an organization-wide development infrastructure based on accumulated experiences within application and technical domains, The domain lifecycle formalizes a process for accumulating project experiences and creating domain knowledge than can be used to increase product quality and improve development productivity. Supporting the domain lifecycle eases development of software that has been developed previously in the organization, freeing designers to concentrate on less well-known elements of an application View full abstract»

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  • A framework for prototyping and mechanically verifying a class of user interfaces

    Page(s): 280 - 288
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    Increasing importance is being attached to the ability of ensuring that graphical user interfaces (GUIs) behave as expected, as they are being used in more applications where safety and security are critical. Prototyping is the preferred approach to creating GUIs because of the need to allow the user to test many of the issues associated with usability. Unfortunately it is often difficult to verify that prototype-based implementations always behave as expected. In this paper we present a framework for prototyping GUI-based applications in which both an implementation (prototype) and a formal model of that implementation are mechanically derived from a description of the application. The model can then be used to support proofs of behavior, while the prototype can be used to test functionality and usability View full abstract»

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  • Program understanding as constraint satisfaction

    Page(s): 318 - 327
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    The process of understanding a source code in a high-level programming language involves complex computation. Given a piece of legacy code and a library of program plan templates, understanding the code corresponds to building mappings from parts of the source code to particular program plans. These mappings could be used to assist an expert in reverse engineering legacy code, to facilitate software reuse, or to assist in the translation of the source into another programming language. In this paper we present a model of program understanding using constraint satisfaction. Within this model we intelligently compose a partial global picture of the source program code by transforming knowledge about the problem domain and the program itself into sets of constraints. We then systematically study different search algorithms and empirically evaluate their performance. One advantage of the constraint satisfaction model is its generality; many previous attempts in program understanding could now be cast under the same spectrum of heuristics, and thus be readily compared. Another advantage is the improvement in search efficiency using various heuristic techniques in constraint satisfaction View full abstract»

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  • A comparison of the results of two surveys on software development and the role of CASE in the UK

    Page(s): 234 - 238
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    The use of CASE and structured methods continues to evolve. This paper examines the extent to which this is reflected in the update of both technologies within the UK. To do this, a comparison is made between the results obtained from a survey carried out in 1990 and a second carried out in 1994. The issues discussed include the use of methods, the use of CASE, tool support for methods, and users' satisfaction with CASE. The key findings were that CASE usage has increased over this period, while in-house method use has begun to predominate View full abstract»

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  • MCASE: model-based CASE

    Page(s): 152 - 161
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    MCASE is an approach to software development which emphasizes the use of operational models throughout the life cycle. Software development consists, therefore, in building, testing and refining models within a seamless process that leads the analyst/developer from analysis to design and finally do the implementation of the system. MCASE is made up of two modeling languages, namely Protob and Quid (the former covering functional and behavioral issues, the latter addressing informational aspects), and a methodology for building the architecture of models. The paper also describes the simulation and animation of the models emphasizing the integration between the functional/behavioral part and the information one View full abstract»

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  • The development of Phedias: a CASE shell

    Page(s): 122 - 131
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    The paper describes the development of Phedias, a CASE shell, whose design objectives include ease of use and portability. Phedias supports method specification and CASE tools (in the form of graphical editors) generation. Within Phedias, a method is specified both conceptually and presentationally. The former is based on the metamodelling principle and by means of a graphical editor whose building blocks are the modelling constructs of a predefined metamodel. The latter is via a form based symbol definition interface which allows symbols to be defined, composed and viewed. Based on both types of specifications, Phedias is able to generate a CASE tool which supports and verifies the use of the method. A specified method together with its CASE tool, can in turn be used to specify other methods View full abstract»

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  • Automatic identification of reusable components

    Page(s): 80 - 87
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    A model for the effective reuse of components from previous software developments is presented. The model has been implemented in a software system which makes use of software measures to assess the reusability of a given component. The results obtained by the system were then benchmarked against the performance of experienced software developers in terms of recognizing reusable components. The initial results suggest that the approach has merit and can serve as a practical mechanism for effectively identifying reusable components from existing software libraries View full abstract»

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  • Reverse engineering as a bridge to CASE

    Page(s): 304 - 317
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    This is an applied research report on the exploitation of reverse engineering technology acquired through the ESPRIT DOCKET Project. It describes three efforts to implement this technology in business applications at the Bremer Warehouse Company, the Technical University of Manchester, and the Union Bank of Switzerland. In all three instances, reverse engineering was used to extract knowledge from existing source code and database structures, in order to build a bridge from the current operating software to a planned CASE environment. In all three instances, automated tools developed within the scope of the DOCKET project were used. The report shows that much remains to be done to really fulfil the requirements of industry View full abstract»

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  • Automated support for distributed software design

    Page(s): 381 - 390
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    Automated support for the software design process has existed for many years in the form of CASE tools. Most of these are tailored to support specific design or analysis methods, and often have knowledge of the corresponding methodology built into the working of the tool. However, in terms of tool support, few of them go much beyond the provision of syntax-sensitive editors and checkers for the design notations concerned. We feel that conventional CASE tools have been too conservative in the level of automated support offered to the human developer. The Software Architect's Assistant is our attempt at addressing this limitation. It is an interactive graphical tool developed to facilitate the manipulation of software architectures, and currently supports the design and construction of Regis distributed programs. In its implementation, conscious effort has been made to maximise usability and efficiency, primarily by enhancing the level of automation and flexibility together with careful design of the user interface. Although currently specific to Regis distributed programs, the Assistant embodies concepts and ideas which are applicable to CASE tools in general View full abstract»

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  • Design of a hyper media tool to support requirements elicitation meetings

    Page(s): 250 - 259
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    Introduces a hypermedia tool for requirements elicitation meetings. We consider such a meeting to be a consensus-making process among the participants, who have their own roles. Participants in the meeting usually repeat the following activities to reach the final specification: (a) preparing the agenda and/or final specification for the next meeting while referring both to their own memory and the secretary's minutes, if accessible; and (b) pursuing the arguments in a meeting while referring either to the agenda for the meeting or to the minutes and their own memory about previous meetings. From observations of several real meetings, most of the final specifications were inconsistent, and unnecessary and redundant communication had occurred in the meetings because a large amount of verbal data in the meetings made each participant's memory and meeting minutes incomplete and ambiguous. From this point of view, our tool gives the participants the following facilities: (1) a plain record of the meetings; (2) a repository for the minutes and agenda extracted from the record; and (3) multi-modal and graphical user interfaces for referring to the repository. Such facilities can be available for the participants to develop both suitable minutes and agendas. Our tool improves the efficiency of a consensus-making process by suppressing unnecessary and redundant communication View full abstract»

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  • Model-based reuse repositories-concepts and experience

    Page(s): 60 - 69
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    Reuse repositories provide a wide range of assets that software engineers can use in developing systems to reduce the need for continual development of components that provide the same functionality. Most current reuse repositories are component based; they provide a catalogue of software components categorized by some scheme. An alternative to the component based repository is the model based repository, which provides a model of information built from the analysis of existing systems within the same domain. This domain model provides the basis for a domain specific software architecture (DSSA), which is a generic solution to the software requirements captured in domain analysis. The DSSA is used as a framework for organizing repository components. This organization includes a mapping between the requirements in the domain model and the specifications in the DSSA. The paper details a conceptual approach to the creation of a model based repository and discusses the development of one such repository-the CARDS Command Center Library (CCL). It is shown how a domain model, a DSSA, and requirements traceability provide the foundation for a model based reuse repository with support for automated system development achieving high levels of reuse, including reuse of requirements and design information. A discussion of the CARDS CCL shows how CARDS has followed this conceptual approach within the USAF Command Center domain View full abstract»

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  • Architecture specification support for component integration

    Page(s): 30 - 39
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    The paper describes an approach to automating the construction of software systems from components. We illustrate how integration-related concerns such as component interfacing, interconnection, distribution and configuration can be modeled with a specification language. We also show how a graphics-based design environment can be used to support visual specification and transformation of integration specifications into implementations. This approach raises the level of architecture specifications to assist the currently labor-intensive and error-prone process of system integration View full abstract»

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  • An evaluation of object-oriented CASE tools: the Newbridge experience

    Page(s): 4 - 9
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    We evaluated a large number of object-oriented CASE tools, concentrating on 14 that seemed particularly interesting. Our primary evaluation criterion was the degree of automatic code generation, but we also considered custom document generation, ease of use, consistency checking, and other factors. We found that, although many tools claim to do automatic code and document generation, very few actually do complete generation of code, and fewer still provide an easy method for automatic generation of design documentation. We present some details of our evaluation, explain why we did not select any CASE tool, and then make suggestions based on our experiences View full abstract»

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  • Automated partial communication deadlock analysis after changes to Ada code

    Page(s): 215 - 224
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    When writing concurrent Ada programs, deadlock is always a possibility. Existing algorithms to analyze for deadlock are either very limited or relatively expensive. While the best are still quite feasible for inclusion in an Ada developer's toolbox, costs start becoming high when changes to code force repeated full re-analysis. This paper uses control-and-communication flow analysis as a basis to derive an efficient algorithm for automated partial re-analysis of Ada programs with respect to communication deadlock. Re-analysis needs are determined based on types of code changes. The paper also presents an analytic evaluation of the efficiency of the re-analysis technique View full abstract»

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  • Providing support for process model enaction in the Metaview metasystem

    Page(s): 141 - 149
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    Process modeling is a means of formally defining many aspects of the software development process through the use of models. Partial automation of a process model can help to improve the software process. Menial or tedious tasks, such as collecting metrics, no longer have to be the responsibility of the developer. Coordination of effort can also be enhanced through automation. Automation can be achieved through the development of a process modeling support environment and the appropriate CASE tools. This is one of the major goals of the Metaview project, which involves the design and development of a metasystem to generate such an environment. A key requirement for this type of support environment is to use an active database. Active databases can react through an action to events, such as changes to a particular data item, thereby giving them the flexibility needed for process modeling. The paper presents an execution model for the support of process model enaction in the Metaview system. The execution model is intended to support a wide variety of process models and process modeling languages. The model is based upon the event rule model used in active databases View full abstract»

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  • A computer-based process handbook for a systems engineering business

    Page(s): 172 - 181
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    This paper outlines a way of using a computer-based handbook for the dissemination of company and project knowledge which alleviates the problems of paper-based procedure manuals. An online facility, a handbook, is created to allow instant access to up-to-date information about a company and the way it operates. The data is organised using a series of models built using the Boardman Soft Systems Methodology and a unique pictorial representation called the `Systemigram' View full abstract»

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  • CASE technologies created in Japan

    Page(s): 226 - 233
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    Looks at CASE technologies originating an Japan and presents some selected ones to an international audience. Japanese computer manufacturers' CASE products have been evolving. These are examined first, summarizing their characteristics. Then, true “upper CASE” products, together with one new development methodology, which have been developed by independent software vendors, are reviewed, highlighting their features. The first one, called “VEST-SAVER”, is built with special emphasis on ease of use for Japanese users. The second one, “X upper”, employs business flow diagrams which are easier for end users to understand. The new methodology, called “VOCJU”, is totally different from conventional methodologies. It is claimed to give the potential for epoch-making productivity improvements. The “Intelligent-Pad” can be considered to be a superb object-oriented visual programming technology. Lastly, re-engineering technologies developed in Japan are covered, with special focus on “RESCUE” View full abstract»

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  • Model-based design of tools for business understanding and re-engineering

    Page(s): 328 - 337
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    Tools can provide useful assistance for business re-engineering planning. Activities such as business knowledge acquisition, business process modeling, performance, quality and impact analysis all can be done more effectively if supported by proper tools. We describe a design scenario for business understanding and re-engineering tools that is based on systematic modeling of business knowledge. The business knowledge model forms conceptual schema for the tool repository. We start by building a generic business model. As both the model and required tool characteristics vary from company to company and from one business re-engineering project to another, we customize the generic model and tools to reflect needs of a given company and a business re-engineering project in hand. We achieve a required level of tool flexibility by applying meta-CASE techniques. The physical repository schema and tools themselves are automatically generated from the customized business model specifications. We focus on tools and analysis methods that have not been extensively described in other sources. We describe an interview assistant tool, support for impact analysis and an end-user query language in which a user can define new business analysis methods, not supported by a generic tool environment View full abstract»

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  • Understanding frameworks by exploration of exemplars

    Page(s): 90 - 99
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    A framework is designed to cover a family of applications or subsystems in a given domain and is typically delivered as a collection of interdependent abstract classes, together with their concrete subclasses. The abstract classes and their interdependencies describe the architecture of the framework. Developing a new application reusing classes of a framework requires a thorough understanding of the framework architecture. We introduce the notion of an exemplar for documenting framework, and propose exploration of exemplars as a means for architecture understanding. An exemplar is a executable visual model consisting of instances of concrete classes together with explicit representation of their collaborations. For each abstract class in the framework, at least one of its concrete subclasses must be instantiated in the exemplar. Model level exploration of exemplars is unique among the prevalent approaches to framework based development; existing approaches still emphasize different class browsing and retrieval technologies, active cookbooks, or code tracing View full abstract»

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