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Automotive Applications of Advanced Modelling and Control, IEE Colloquium on

Date 16 Nov 1994

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Displaying Results 1 - 9 of 9
  • Design concepts and details for an active roll control systems

    Page(s): 4/1 - 4/7
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (164 KB)  

    Active roll control is a cost effective approach to conventional suspension enhancement. A general active suspension can allow good low frequency vibration isolation and can eliminate body roll and pitch in (low frequency) manoeuvring. However, it is doubtful if car users can discern modest vibration isolation improvements, since they are not sufficiently in touch with the excitation which gives rise to the response which they feel. On the other hand, drivers are themselves responsible for the steering excitation which provokes a manoeuvre, so they are closely connected with both input and response. They seem to be much more impressed by handling improvements than by ride improvements View full abstract»

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  • Observers in engine control systems: What is the potential?

    Page(s): 5/1 - 5/3
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (168 KB)  

    Observer technology offers substantial scope to improve engine control system performance. Improved control response, the creation of “virtual” sensors and fault detection and diagnosis are all functional improvements which are offered. A simple fault detection function is a proven concept on a turbocharged diesel engine. Control system observers have an appearance of being complex and there is a natural reluctance on the part of vehicle manufacturers to insert complexity into an engine management system without significant benefits. A single exhaust gas oxygen sensor has been demonstrated to provide multiple cylinder measurements. The demand for single cylinder control, an on-board diagnostics (OBD) mandate and the arrival of robust and cheap hydrocarbon sensors may give enough of a impetus View full abstract»

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  • IEE Colloquium on `Automotive Applications of Advanced Modelling and Control' (Digest No.1994/218)

    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (36 KB)  

    The following topics were dealt with: automotive control overview; integrated motion control systems; computer aided analysis and design of traction control system; active roll control systems; observers in engine control systems; sliding mode based control strategies; dynamics modelling and control; adaptive and semi-active suspension systems; and active suspension system View full abstract»

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  • The application of advanced modelling techniques to reduce prototyping time for a novel active suspension system

    Page(s): 9/1 - 9/4
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (180 KB)  

    This paper describes the application of a range of simulation and design techniques to the development of a prototype active suspension system using a novel actuation technique within tight cost and time constraints. The suspension system is centred around a buckling leaf spring element with a very low effective spring rate. This is connected between the body and suspension using a variable geometry linkage giving variable mechanical leverage ratios. The force at the wheel is thus variable, by changing the linkage geometry, but is almost independent of the wheel to body displacement. The modelling and simulation techniques employed include: static modelling, nonlinear dynamic modelling, and control system and signal processing simulation View full abstract»

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  • Integration and implementation of a priori knowledge for dynamics modelling and control

    Page(s): 7/1 - 7/3
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    Neural networks have been employed in a range of automotive modelling and control tasks. This paper discusses the recently introduced local model network structure. The structure can be viewed as a hybrid model which smoothly combines local models (of linear or nonlinear form) by interpolation. Interpolation of local models is implemented in the form of a basis-function network. The benefits of this structure include: existing knowledge can be directly integrated, and the model can be fully analysed and interpreted in a local manner. The author describes the local model network and discusses its relevance for automotive modelling and control tasks View full abstract»

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  • Sliding mode based control strategies for automotive systems

    Page(s): 6/1 - 6/3
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (184 KB)  

    A variable structure control system (VSCS) may be used to provide robust control of uncertain, often nonlinear, dynamical systems which are subject to external disturbances. The method has thus received some attention from sections of the automotive industry where nonlinear behaviour is common, the operating environment is harsh and tight performance specifications are often required. This paper first outlines the fundamental properties of the VSCS philosophy. The development of a simple VSCS for an automotive actuator including the results of bench test trials is reviewed. The conclusion offers an analytical overview of the best contemporary theoretical practices in relation to the needs of the automotive industry View full abstract»

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  • Automotive control overview

    Page(s): 1/1 - 1/5
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (292 KB)  

    The availability of low cost rugged microelectronics has enabled automotive control systems to rapidly advance from hydro-mechanical and simple electro-mechanical implementations to sophisticated computer based systems. These are usually developed as individual subsystems with limited interaction between sub-systems. The current challenge for the automotive control engineer is to address the problem of control systems integration. The possibilities for integrated control take two forms: 1) within the vehicle, the installation of a control area network; and 2) outside the vehicle, there is a need to integrate the action of individual vehicles within a road infrastructure View full abstract»

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  • Adaptive and semiactive suspension systems with lower prices and only small energy requirements

    Page(s): 8/1 - 8/2
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (60 KB)  

    The effects of adjustable shock absorbers and spring- and tyre-stiffness on suspension systems are discussed. The effects on vertical driving comfort and dynamic wheel load are considered, for both passenger cars and commercial trucks View full abstract»

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  • Computer aided approach to the analysis and design of a traction control system

    Page(s): 3/1 - 3/6
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (132 KB)  

    This paper reports on aspects of ongoing work to establish the potential of alternatives to rule-based traction control schemes. The paper is concerned primarily with the modelling and control of a brake intervention system. Control theory objectives have led to the development of a full nonlinear MATRIXx simulation model as the test bed to evaluate the performance of different control approaches View full abstract»

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