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Issues of Co-Operative Working in Concurrent Engineering, IEE Colloquium on

Date 1994

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Displaying Results 1 - 11 of 11
  • Concurrent engineering with suppliers: an `ever closer union'

    Publication Year: 1994 , Page(s): 5/1 - 5/4
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (176 KB)  

    This paper examines the move to concurrent engineering with suppliers in one particular company, Rolls-Royce plc. It discusses the changes in the relationship between Rolls-Royces' Aerospace group and its suppliers to support concurrent engineering. It focuses on the re-design of business processes and the framework required to support this adaptation. Using this experience, the paper draws wider conclusions on the effect of an `ever closer union' between a company and its suppliers View full abstract»

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  • Design for testability, reliability and maintainability

    Publication Year: 1994 , Page(s): 4/1 - 4/5
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (248 KB)  

    To meet the objective of high yield and high reliability the author proposes the combined use of the following techniques: design for functionality, design to cost, design for manufacture, design for testability, design for reliability, design for maintainability, statistical process control, failure reporting and corrective analysis system, failure mode effect and criticality analysis, and concurrent engineering View full abstract»

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  • Observations on the implementation of SE, the use of gaming techniques to empower teams and case studies of team working in selected UK industry

    Publication Year: 1994 , Page(s): 1/1 - 112
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    Over the last three years a Brunel University team has explored the implementation of simultaneous engineering (SE) in a number of British companies in order to: understand what SE means in a British context; reveal “best practice” in SE; and explore ways of using gaming techniques to empower team working. This paper reports those studies in summary form resulting from an early analysis of the observations made to date. In particular, case studies were made of five SE contexts to show what companies meant by SE, where they tried to implement it and what form this implementation took. A simple questionnaire, which aimed to identify key implementation issues was targeted at companies who had demonstrated an interest in SE. Another, complementary study, looked at the way communication can promote or inhibit SE. A final group of studies, in the university and industrial contexts, looked at how gaming techniques could be used to empower people with the teamworking attitudes and skills which is so essential to the fullest operation of SE. The key elements of this framework are summarised View full abstract»

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  • An agent-oriented framework for concurrent engineering

    Publication Year: 1994 , Page(s): 9/1 - 9/4
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (264 KB)  

    We propose a model for the concurrent engineering process based on an agent-oriented approach. Our modelling approach captures the relationships between the attributes, perceptions and actions of agents. Our model differs from traditional models in that it deals not only with the object being designed, but also with the interaction between the human design agents and its influence upon the development of an evolving prototype. Such a model can be applied even where the design process itself has a nonroutine character, with incomplete task descriptions, nondeterministic solution paths and on-going human intervention. The design object can be seen as having a complex hierarchical structure, and each agent as having its own view of the object. We describe a multilevel procedure that specifies the way in which the design object is synthesised from agent views over time. In this process, the design object is developed in a bottom-up fashion through the coordination of activities of agents at every level. The complex activity of each agent is described as a sequence of elementary generic activities associated with observation and experiment. In computational terms, the effect of agent activity upon the design object is expressed through the use of scripts of definitions which can be operationally interpreted View full abstract»

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  • Development of a knowledge platform on concurrent engineering

    Publication Year: 1994 , Page(s): 6/1 - 6/6
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (204 KB)  

    Over the past decade there has been a growing debate in the literature regarding the most appropriate strategies for the implementation of concurrent engineering. Now there are several examples/cases outlining the effectiveness of different tools, techniques and methodologies etc. This paper focuses on the knowledge platform, which is like an “intelligent library”. It reports on the underlying basis for the research study, addresses the key elements of the knowledge platform including the current status of the research project to date, and briefly outlines the future direction of the research programme View full abstract»

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  • Extended enterprise partnerships

    Publication Year: 1994 , Page(s): 3/1 - 3/2
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (108 KB)  

    World wide advances in manufacturing, physical distribution, retailing and information and communication technologies have created important opportunities for advances in management of the extended supply chain. Modern industrial supply chains operate as multipartner networks (extended logistics networks) of retailers, manufacturing distributors and supplier enterprises. Such chains now have to respond to the conflicting demands of improved customer service, just-in-time delivery, reduced inventory and working capital, elimination of spare capacity and faster response to market. ESPRIT Project 65991 EAGLE aims to provide the basis for a new generation of decision-support systems that improve service levels, response times and profitability by ensuring the delivery of cost-effective quantities of all products needed at the right time and place throughout the manufacturing logistics network View full abstract»

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  • IEE Colloquium on `Issues of Co-Operative Working in Concurrent Engineering' (Digest No.1994/177)

    Publication Year: 1994
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (12 KB)  

    The following topics were dealt with: team working; gaming technique; simultaneous engineering; product life cycle development; extended enterprise partnerships; design for testability, reliability and maintainability; concurrent engineering; knowledge platform; coperative knowledge; agent oriented framework; and concurrent software engineering View full abstract»

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  • Designers using cooperative knowledge

    Publication Year: 1994 , Page(s): 8/1 - 8/3
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    Discusses work aimed at facilitating concurrent engineering in the CSCW context by: 1. Supporting the dispersed team meeting; 2. Providing total traceability; 3. Empowering the intervention of (absent) experts; 4. Enabling design reuse; 5. Supporting design process improvement via design research View full abstract»

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  • Environments to support concurrent design teams: a prequel

    Publication Year: 1994 , Page(s): 7/1 - 7/3
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    Design decisions can have unforeseen side effects that cause the need for redesign to propagate across partially completed designs. This risk prevails in linear and ordered models of multidisciplinary design wherein a sequence of specialists each aim to sign off `completed' portions of a design to their successors. One might imagine that such models should be relatively efficient and easy to manage. Work should flow down-stream from market research to specification to concept design to detail design to manufacture and, finally, to sales. Therefore, since the points of contact between designers are known, each designer should be able to make design decisions whose consequences match the requirements of her immediate successors. The practical flaw in this theory is that one designer's output can conflict with the demands of another designer who is located two or more stages downstream in the ordered sequence of specialists. For example, when a manufacturing designer uncovers mistaken assumptions in the work of a concept designer the need for redesign can propagate back upstream to both the concept designer and to the intervening detail designer. Having established the need for concurrent engineering, the author discusses techniques therein, and in particular the use of knowledge engineering View full abstract»

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  • A methodology for product life-cycle development for global manufacturing

    Publication Year: 1994 , Page(s): 2/1 - 2/7
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (352 KB)  

    This paper demonstrates the framework and major objectives of the ESPRIT project 7752, IMS-GCE. The collaboration is international and the consortium members represent a cohesive group from the various regions, including companies and research institutions from the UK, USA, Canada, Italy, Denmark, and Finland. Those collaborators have been working effectively together on a comparative study of global concurrent engineering to find the best practices and major constraints, and to design an architecture for a concurrent engineering system for global manufacturing. Some of the results which show how a product can be manufactured in several countries with ease of co-ordination that results in highly efficient production and logistics are discussed View full abstract»

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  • Concurrent software engineering: coordinating distributed viewpoints for managing inconsistency

    Publication Year: 1994 , Page(s): 10/1 - 10/2
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (100 KB)  

    Concurrent engineering involves the collaboration and coordination of a physically distributed team with variable opportunities for communication with one another. Traditional approaches to the problems of distributed working use a central database, or repository, to which all team members have communication access. Consistency is managed in this database through strict access control and version management, along with a common data model or schema. Such centralised approaches do not adequately support the reality of distributed engineering, where communication with a central database cannot always be guaranteed, and access control rapidly becomes a bottleneck. The alternative, a fully decentralised environment, is seen to be problematic because of the difficulties of maintaining consistency between a large collection of agents. However, these problems can be overcome by recognising that maintaining global consistency at all times is an unnecessary burden. Indeed, it is often desirable to tolerate and even encourage inconsistency, to maximise design freedom, and to prevent premature commitment to design decisions. The focus therefore shifts from maintaining consistency to the management of inconsistencies View full abstract»

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