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Application Specific Integrated Circuits for Measurement Systems, IEE Colloquium on

Date 24 Feb 1994

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Displaying Results 1 - 10 of 10
  • Microelectronics and microengineering: the technology combination of the future

    Page(s): 1/1 - 1/2
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (160 KB)  

    The technology for complete integration of transducers, electronic measurement system and actuators on a single chip already exists, though microengineering is still in its infancy and development of a complete system on a chip will pass through a logical sequence. First generation systems will likely consist of separate sensor, actuator and electronic chips perhaps mounted in the same header. Sensors with some on board electronics have already been demonstrated and complete system chips will be developed in the forseeable future View full abstract»

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  • The use of ASICs in the implementation of distance measurement using pulsed infra-red techniques

    Page(s): 9/1 - 9/4
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (232 KB)  

    The defence group (DG) of THORN EMI electronics specializes in the design and manufacture of equipment for installation in guided weapon (GW) systems. These items of equipment often have to be installed in confined, peculiarly shaped spaces, such as the nose cone of a missile or shell, in order to be able to accommodate requirements for increased circuit complexity within the limited space envelopes available, DG has adopted increasing levels of system and circuit integration. These include the use of application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) technology and advanced manufacturing techniques, such as the use of surface mount components. Since the early 1970s, DG has developed a number of products, including altimeters and GW proximity fuzes, that embody distance measuring sensors based on pulsed infra-red techniques, using solid state, uncooled laser and photo-detector components. This paper reviews the evolution within DG of the electronic circuitry for this class of product. In particular, the merits of employing an ASIC implementation for major functional elements of the receiver signal processing chain are reviewed View full abstract»

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  • Design of flexible ASIC's including embedded processors for smart sensor applications

    Page(s): 5/1 - 5/3
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    This paper describes work undertaken in collaboration with Southampton University and European Silicon Structures (ES2). It is the basis of a LINK project titled "ASIC Subsystems for Smart Sensors" supported by the DTI and SERC. The aims of the project are to investigate the facilities offered by the inclusion of a microprocessor core in the signal processing ASIC, to develop additional cells to support the smart sensor concept and at a higher level in the hierarchy to develop reusable system level blocks which will permit rapid redesign to meet new applications View full abstract»

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  • A reconfigurable ASIC front end

    Page(s): 3/1 - 3/4
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    This paper describes the work carried out on developing a reconfigurable ASIC front end for an intelligent sensor system. It is part of a joint industrial and academic research programme in ASICs for smart sensors involving the University of Southampton, Lucas Advanced Engineering Centre and European Silicon Structures (ES2). A test chip has been produced which facilitates the investigation of various aspects of system reconfiguration under digital control. In order to maximise the capability for experimentation, there is a high pin count so that interconnections and resistors can be added externally. The device is realised as standard CMOS library subsystems within the ES2 process. Ten-bit analogue-to-digital conversion (ADC) and digital-to-analogue (DAC) conversion are included View full abstract»

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  • A signal processing ASIC for an electronic nose

    Page(s): 8/1 - 8/5
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    This paper describes the development of a multi-channel BiCMOS ASIC that is capable of measuring absolute and changes in resistance. As such it is used for interrogating sensors based on resistive arrays. The AS1C was initially developed as part of an integrated electronic nose based on conducting polymers. The integrated nose is a hybrid constructed on a multi-layer, thick-film ceramic substrate. At one end, an array of 32 pairs of exposed gold electrodes surround 3 sides of a ground plane. Each electrode measures 1 mm×0.25 mm, they are separated by 0.25 mm and are shorted in pairs by conducting polymers. Each electrode is routed back to the 84-pin Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) which is the subject of this paper. The chip was designed in-house, and fabricated by SGS-Thomson in a 2 μm BiCMOS process under the EUROCHIP initiative View full abstract»

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  • Software drivers for the reconfigurable ASIC analogue front end

    Page(s): 4/1 - 4/4
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (232 KB)  

    The reconfiguration of the analogue front end of an intelligent sensor ASIC is implemented by means of analogue switches under digital control. A simplified diagram that concentrates solely on switching circuitry is shown. The configuration of this sub-system is determined by a vector of noughts and ones, which wholly determines its state. In an experimental version there are sixteen such switches, so any given state of the sub-system can be represented by a 16-bit word, that can be stored in a register-mapped memory space of the controlling digital processor. This is advantageous, as it permits a number of standard configurations to be stored and quickly implemented. Thus the sub-system can be switched into a self-check or self calibration mode with very few control instructions View full abstract»

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  • Transmit and receive ASICs for an ultrasound imaging multi-element array transducer

    Page(s): 6/1 - 6/5
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (316 KB)  

    High resolution focused beams of ultrasonic energy are used for imaging purposes for example by the medical profession and in non-destructive testing. High resolution beam focusing is achieved by pulsing the elements of an ultrasonic array transducer in some predetermined manner. This may take the form of a phased array, which allows for an electronically steered beam (sector scanning), or a linear array which typically would allow groups of elements to be successively pulsed along the array, or even a combination of the two. Conventional multi-element ultrasound transducer arrays are connected by long multi-wire cables to the system's electronics and display unit. This can cause numerous problems including interference and reflections along the cables. The net effect of these is to make the system signal-to-noise ratio poorer. These effects are magnified if the system is designed to operate at higher than conventional ultrasound frequencies. Currently an Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC), capable of providing sixteen programmable channels, each of 1 ns time resolution and with a dynamic range of 219 (easily extendable), has been developed in 1.5-μm CMOS technology under the Eurochip initiative. The role of this chip is to provide delays of programmable length which determine the firing order of the high voltage pulse circuitry of the array elements. It Is envisaged that this ASIC will form part of a generic chip set for operating high frequency arrays in any mode View full abstract»

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  • Low-cost simulation of mixed-signal ASIC functionality

    Page(s): 2/1 - 2/4
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (260 KB)  

    While searching for a method to retain engineering control of design, as for the first ASIC, while using the expertise of a silicon vendor led the author to develop the simulation method described in the paper. The approach is concerned mainly with analogue and quasi-static logic and is of such low-cost that it will allow even the smallest company to model an ASIC function and confirm its technological benefits before having to commit large sums of money for its development. It also allows the user to remain fully in the design loop while the silicon vendor completes the complex and otherwise hidden silicon design View full abstract»

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  • ASICs for monitoring and controlling electric motors

    Page(s): 10/1 - 10/4
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (232 KB)  

    Describes how ASIC design methods can be applied to the monitoring and control of electric motors and shows some of the system requirements and how they can be implemented using standard building blocks. By reference to a design case study, the use of an ASIC in the control of a DC electric motor shows that the functions of a microprocessor-based system can be replaced by a single ASIC View full abstract»

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  • Two dimensional, high resolution, charged-particle sensing ASICs

    Page(s): 7/1 - 7/6
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (376 KB)  

    Describes development of a high resolution imaging XPS spectrometer. The spectrometer was to consist of four main components. A high magnification input lens; double 180° concentric hemispherical analyzers; a transfer lens between the two analyzers; and a high spatial resolution two-dimensional charge injected device (CID) detector. The input lens was to operate in the imaging mode with a magnification of at least 20. At the final exit plane there exists a spatially (and hence energy) resolved electron image, to be amplified by micro-channel plate electron multipliers and output to the CID detector. This detector has been designed to have 256×256 channels with 20 μm×20 μm pixel dimension. Thus the spatial resolution, with a times 20 magnification will be 1 μm. With this design the whole image (=250 μm) will be acquired continuously in real time without scanning the primary X-ray beam, the sample, or the ejected photoelectrons. This will allow chemical maps to be obtained at high spatial resolutions with significantly improved data collection speeds over present methods. This paper will describe the high spatial resolution, two-dimensional, charge injected, electron sensing device (CID) that is used to detect the spatially resolved image View full abstract»

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