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Integrating Telecommunications and Information Technology on the Desktop, IEE Colloquium on

Date 1994

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  • IEE Colloquium `Integrating Telecommunications and Information Technology on the Desktop' (Digest No.1994/073)

    Publication Year: 1994
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (16 KB)  

    The following topics were dealt with: workstation based multimedia conferencing; BT vision technology; teleconferencing workstation; networked multimedia for informal collaboration; services for deaf people; desktop multimedia services; and real-time interactive speech integration with screen data on LANs View full abstract»

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  • An experimental integrated workstation for teleconferencing

    Publication Year: 1994 , Page(s): 5/1 - 5/5
    Cited by:  Patents (3)
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (276 KB)  

    This paper gives a brief description of an integrated workstaton based on the IBM PC for use as a videoconferencing terminal for communication over an integrated services digital network using asynchronous transfer mode. The MASTER (Multimedia AidS for TeleconfERencing) project, funded largely by the Science and Engineering Research Council, was set up to investigate a low-cost teleconferencing environment suitable for operation across an ISDN. When this project was first conceived telephone-based teleconferencing systems was already in use, but were still quite expensive to install. It was felt that technological advances were making possible the reception, and play-back, of pictures and sound on ordinary desk-top computers, which would provide the basis for low-cost teleconferencing systems. Towards the end of this project, these advances have received recognition, first, through the production of `multimedia personal computers', and more recently, by the announcement of low-cost teleconferencing (video/audio) systems View full abstract»

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  • BT vision technology for the desktop

    Publication Year: 1994 , Page(s): 2/1 - 2/2
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (64 KB)  

    This paper gives an overview of BT's portfolio of vision technology with more detailed information presented on BT's personal computer videophone and ISDN videophone. A demonstration of the PC videophone is followed by a description of possible applications and what might happen in the future. BT is currently adding two new videophones to its range of videoconferencing equipment. The PC videophone uses BT's vision technology to provide a single slot solution for a PC to enable one-to-one multimedia meetings. BT has worked with IT partners to produce a package including application software which has the following main features: fully H.320 compliant, single PC slot, API available, full colour, chalkboards, contact directories; file transfer, JPEG image compression, video/audio in/out, handsfree telephone and detachable camera View full abstract»

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  • Workstation-based multimedia conferencing: Experiences from the MICE project

    Publication Year: 1994 , Page(s): 1/1 - 1/6
    Cited by:  Patents (22)
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (400 KB)  

    In 1992, the CEC agreed to finance a one-year project called `Piloting of Multimedia Integrated Services for European Researchers (MICE)'. The goal of the project is to enable interworking between European researchers, and connecting them to sites in the US, using existing facilities. The main aim of MICE is to enable multimedia conferencing (audio, video and shared workspace) between conference rooms and workstation-based facilities, hardware and software codecs, packet-switched networks and ISDN, using both uni- and multicast technology View full abstract»

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  • Requirements and solutions for integration of multimedia services on the desktop

    Publication Year: 1994 , Page(s): 9/1 - 9/9
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (536 KB)  

    The use of networked multimedia by various industry sectors, in relation to particular business activities. Effective multimedia systems are required to handle very large amounts of information represented in a variety of forms, from unformated text through to full motion video. Full desktop multimedia solutions will require development work in areas beyond the PC or workstation itself namely; LANs, network multimedia servers, and software tools. Also, the communication networks must provide several key features such as high capacity, variable bandwidth, synchronisation of different types of traffic and support for different types of data flow (isochronous and asynchronous) View full abstract»

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  • Is it a telephone or is it a computer?

    Publication Year: 1994 , Page(s): 3/1 - 3/3
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (196 KB)  

    The likeable and usable service interfaces LUSI project has concentrated its effort by adopting a `problem up' approach. The project identified 3 public service categories, messaging, conversational and retrieval, and, taking into account the availability of services to partners, selected 14 user-service interfaces for inclusion into the first experimental phase of the project. The services employed, identified in a table, include videotex, multimedia videoconferencing and videotelephony. The purpose of these trials was to identify users problems with the user interfaces and to categorise those problems as common to all services or as particular to a given category or type. By biasing the samples of users participating in the trials towards the elderly (those aged 60 or over) LUSI is confident that the range of problems encountered is representative of those the public at large face when using modern telecommunications services View full abstract»

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  • Moving the `desktop' into the field

    Publication Year: 1994 , Page(s): 4/1 - 4/3
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (264 KB)  

    The electricty industry, as other utilities, is concerned with the management of large scale distribution networks. These networks have been developing for more than a century and the methods for operating them have changed over this time. For almost fifty years mobile communications have played an increasingly important role in the co-ordination of activities in the field. In more recent years, the industry has exploited IT with the result that a significant amount of mixed-media information is now held in computerised form. This information is available to office workers on their desktop. However, it is believed that substantial benefits could be accrued by making this information available to those workers who operate in the field, i.e. by moving the desktop into the field. This paper reports on the initial findings of the DTI/SERC supported MOST project which aims to produce a pilot system to demonstrate how mixed-media information can be exploited in the field using mobile computers and wide-area radio communications as enabling technologies View full abstract»

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  • Networked multimedia support for informal collaboration

    Publication Year: 1994 , Page(s): 6/1 - 6/4
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (292 KB)  

    As part of a general research investigation into the use of technology in socially organised work at EuroPARC, the authors have, been studying the use of networked multimedia environments, or media spaces, in supporting work group collaboration. They have built a media space, the Ravenscoft Audio/Video Environment (RAVE), and used it in support of their own workplace activities for a number of years. Their experience has been that primary value of the technology has not been the explicit `desktop conferencing' of that sort, but rather the way in which patterns of informal contact and passive awareness can be supported. These forms of communication are quite different to the traditional desktop conferencing model. They are often spontaneous and opportunistic, rather than prearranged; they are lightweight to initiate, and often involve little more than information sharing rather than being organised around an explicit task. It is important that multimedia communication systems provide support for these as well as more traditional formal and focused ones. This paper describes a number of aspects of informal communication which media space technology facilitates, together with some of the benefits and problems which accompany it View full abstract»

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  • Telecommunity-technology and services to integrate deaf people at work

    Publication Year: 1994 , Page(s): 7/1 - 7/3
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (168 KB)  

    With the ongoing effects of organisations, such as RNID, to campaign for an end to discrimination against deaf people in society, it is necessary to consider how certain key technologies, such as video telephony, can help in this process. Telecommunity, as part of the RACE program, is developing novel video telephony technology and services to provide support to disabled people both at home and at work. The UK ACE (Advanced Communications Experiment) is concerned with providing services to deaf people. These services, mediated through video telephony (VT), are designed to meet the needs of people whose degree of deafness is such that they are unable to gain adequate benefit from the ordinary telephone system-even with the maximum amount of receive end amplification. Furthermore, it is strongly believed that these services will also appeal to a much wider range of potential users, whose level of functioning with the ordinary telephone can be considered only marginal View full abstract»

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  • Network support for mixed media integrated applications

    Publication Year: 1994 , Page(s): 8/1 - 8/6
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (312 KB)  

    The enrichment of the user environment brought about by the integration of non-text based information presentation and capture presents significant demands upon the current hierarchy of data networks. This paper examines these requirements and suggests that asynchronous transfer mode (ATM) presents a sufficiently scaleable and usable technology to become a major enabling force within mixed media applications View full abstract»

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  • Integration of real-time interactive speech with screen data on Local Area Networks: a step towards multimedia in a commercial/industrial environment

    Publication Year: 1994 , Page(s): 10/1 - 10/4
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (188 KB)  

    Research at the University of Plymouth (UoP) has identified that communication between users of workstations in a commercial/industrial environment would be considerably enhanced if a real-time speech link was available in addition to `screen-share' facilities. This paper investigates the problems of implementing a real-time interactive speech link by integrating the speech packets (PCM) within the data frames employed on commercially available LANs. This is a step towards a truly integrated information system (multimedia) in a commercial/industrial environment View full abstract»

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