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Software Engineering Journal

Issue 4 • Date July 1986

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Displaying Results 1 - 7 of 7
  • Editorial: Programming languages

    Publication Year: 1986
    IEEE is not the copyright holder of this material | PDF file iconPDF (165 KB)
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Coral 86

    Publication Year: 1986, Page(s):147 - 150
    IEEE is not the copyright holder of this material | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (480 KB)

    Coral 66 was developed as a real-time programming language nearly twenty years ago. Its syntax took account of the computer architecture of the time and the compilers, which were developed over a decade ago, reflect the same standard of architecture. So it is not surprising that the portable Coral cross-compilers of today do not make use of the powerful instructions available. This paper discusses... View full abstract»

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  • Transition from Coral to Ada programming

    Publication Year: 1986, Page(s):151 - 153
    IEEE is not the copyright holder of this material | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (481 KB)

    The programming language Coral 66 has a large following in the UK as a general-purpose computer language, especially in the embedded computer application area. The Ada programming language is destined to become an international standard language and was designed to satisfy the needs of the same application area as Coral 66. A change from programmingn in Coral to Ada is inevitable in many future pr... View full abstract»

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  • PolyForth: an electronics engineer's programming tool

    Publication Year: 1986, Page(s):154 - 158
    IEEE is not the copyright holder of this material | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (649 KB)

    This paper describes the features of the language polyFORTH (an advanced version of FORTH) that the authors consider offer the engineer full control in the application of software to real-time control systems. This description is from an electronics engineer's viewpoint, based on the usage of this language in a large number of projects, from small intelligent instruments to large multiprocessor in... View full abstract»

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  • Features of artificial intelligence languages and their environments

    Publication Year: 1986, Page(s):159 - 164
    IEEE is not the copyright holder of this material | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1107 KB)

    This article describes the features of artificial intelligence problems that have affected the design of artificial intelligence languages. It describes ways in which artificial intelligence languages have been developed to cope with these features. It explains the role of the programming environment in which the artificial intelligence researcher works and how it is closely coupled with the langu... View full abstract»

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  • An introduction to Occam and the development of parallel software

    Publication Year: 1986, Page(s):165 - 169
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    IEEE is not the copyright holder of this material | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (749 KB)

    Most people's knowledge of Occam¿¿ derives from their interest in the Inmos¿¿ Transputer. Occam is the language of the Transputer, the two having been developed hand-in-hand by Inmos. Although most of the initial applications of Occam have been concerned with extracting the maximum performance from multiple Transputer-based architectures, it should be pointed out that Occam is not an assembly-leve... View full abstract»

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  • NewSpeak: an unexceptional language

    Publication Year: 1986, Page(s):170 - 176
    IEEE is not the copyright holder of this material | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1124 KB)

    NewSpeak is a language designed for use in safety-critical programs. It tries to limit the freedom of the programmer to the kind of ideas in programming that are reasonably easy to formalise, without making these restrictions unduly onerous. Its principal characteristic is that it has no exceptional values or states. Incorrect constructions which would lead to exceptional behaviour, such as range ... View full abstract»

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