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CAD in the Aerospace Industry, IEE Colloquium on

Date 21 Apr 1989

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  • The use of structured models for the simulation of pneumatic control systems

    Publication Year: 1989 , Page(s): 1/1 - 1/4
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (100 KB)  

    In order to meet more demanding dynamic performance specifications for pneumatic control systems, designs are becoming increasingly complex and require precision tuning to achieve optimum performance over a wide range of operating conditions. These complex designs are normally a result of an extended development programme which has often required the incorporation of additional components of palliative solutions to problems identified during performance tests. These tests, carried out at great cost, rarely cover all operating conditions. Consequently, confidence in the design becomes low when operating conditions are not these which have already been considered in the test programme. These development costs can be curtailed by the intelligent use of properly developed and validated digital computer simulation models. In this paper it is shown how such models can be readily established using a structured, Fortran-based simulation language. Furthermore, it is shown how a series of submodels can be used to develop a simulation model of a gas servomechanism for missile control fin deflection View full abstract»

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  • Using CAD as an aerodynamic tool

    Publication Year: 1989 , Page(s): 5/1 - 5/3
    Cited by:  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (108 KB)  

    Most aerodynamic departments in the aircraft industry use mathematical prediction methods for analysis. Amongst the most popular of these are three dimensional inviscid flow panel methods which compute the change in velocity and direction of air flow over a series of flat panels. To maintain accuracy these panel methods require many panels in highly curved areas such as wing leading edges. The author describes a package which is being used successfully by a European aircraft company. It makes good use of a system bought predominantly for its design and machining capabilities by the aerodynamic department. It removes most of the skill needed to drive a CAD package by the use of a meaningful menu display. A hidden advantage of this is that once a preliminary design is accepted, the geometry exists and may be used by the design and manufacturing departments, i.e. it allows true top-down design with the aerodynamicist, and not the designer, getting the first influence on external shape View full abstract»

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  • IEE Colloquium on `CAD in the Aerospace Industry' (Digest No.65)

    Publication Year: 1989
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (24 KB)  

    The following topics were dealt with: the use of structured models for the simulation of pneumatic control systems; review of CAD techniques for the radio and radar performance of aircraft; boundary elements for CAD; an integrated package for the design and construction of aircraft structural compounds using a parametric CADCAM method; using CAD as an aerodynamic tool; and an integrated information system for electronic manufacture View full abstract»

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  • An integrated package for the design and construction of aircraft structural components using a parametric CADCAM method

    Publication Year: 1989 , Page(s): 4/1 - 4/4
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (192 KB)  

    Shows the advantage of CADCAM and outlines the development of software which is both easy to use and flexible, for applications in CADCAM of aircraft components in initial stages of parametric design. To limit the task to manageable proportions, it was decided to concentrate on wing components. The package which has been developed does not design all components of a wing, but it mainly concentrates upon the parametric integration of CAD and CAM with respect to wing riblet components, although the method could be used for other components. The objective was to develop a paperless parametric CADCAM link which would bridge the gap of conventional parametric CAD and CAM. Furthermore, the developed system shows benefits in linking design and manufacture of families of components. Thus, the objectives were limited to highlighting the parametric CADCAM advantages and disadvantages, and the benefits in the design and manufacture of aircraft wing components. The package was developed using parametric programming languages; GRIP and GRIP-Numerical Control (GRIP-NC) View full abstract»

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  • An integrated information system for electronic manufacture

    Publication Year: 1989 , Page(s): 6/1 - 6/3
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (108 KB)  

    Described in this paper is a fully integrated design-to-manufacture information system. The first part of the paper deals with the automatic conversion of design data into data directly useable in manufacture. This is followed by a description of the data distribution system used to convey information from design to manufacture. Software has been developed to interrogate the CAD model, and to make all the decisions necessary to generate NC programs for the following manufacturing processes: piercing of metal sheets prior to bending, turning and milling, drilling and profiling printed circuit boards, and automatic insertion of components into printed boards. This software runs automatically, without any human intervention, often on unattended overnight batch processing View full abstract»

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  • A review of CAD techniques for the radio and radar performance of aircraft

    Publication Year: 1989 , Page(s): 2/1 - 2/4
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (232 KB)  

    External radiofrequency electromagnetic fields induce currents in conducting parts of the exterior surface of an aircraft. These currents cause new re-radiated fields and this process is fundamental to the detection of the aircraft by distant radar. The surface currents also interact with receiving antennas on the aircraft in various ways, depending on the frequency band. A further issue that is of increasing concern is that of the interaction between external radio waves and internal electronic systems inside the aircraft skin. The scattering properties of the aircraft when illuminated by an external radar are mainly of concern in military applications, where a small radar cross-section (RCS) is always desirable: this imposes a strong constraint on the exterior design of the aircraft, probably the dominant constraint if `stealth' is desired. The detailed analysis of all of the affects discussed above requires techniques for modelling the interaction of the exterior structure of the aircraft with electromagnetic waves, which are normally considered to emanate either from a source point on the aircraft, or from a distant source. Except for the very simplest of shapes (spheroids), this cannot be done analytically and a discrete numerical model is instead required. Techniques currently used to achieve this may be divided into three broad categories, as follows: (i) differential-equation methods, (ii) integral equation methods, and (iii) ray-tracing methods View full abstract»

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