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Computer

Issue 10 • Date Oct. 1973

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Displaying Results 1 - 19 of 19
  • [Front cover]

    Page(s): c1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Pattern recognition data bases

    Page(s): c2
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  • [Advertisements]

    Page(s): 1 - 2
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  • Contents

    Page(s): 3
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  • Calendar

    Page(s): 4
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  • Call for papers

    Page(s): 5
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  • From the president

    Page(s): 6
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    Much of our attention has been focussed recently on our relations with the IEEE. However, significant events are taking place among the professional societies that represent the computer industry. We must deal with these events, and the way we deal with them could have a great impact on the future stature and role of our Society. View full abstract»

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  • Update information for the computer systems design professional

    Page(s): 7 - 12
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    The following slate of nominees to the Governing Board of the IEEE Computer Society will be presented on November 16, 1973 at the Governing Board meeting to be held at the Happy Dolphin Inn, St. Petersburg Beach, Florida, during the Third Data Communications Conference. View full abstract»

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  • Modular computer systems

    Page(s): 13 - 14
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    This is an important time in the history of modular computer systems. The first generation has been developed and its products are in daily use; now the developers of modular computer systems are taking the first steps toward the second generation. The first generation systems started with the fixed-plus-variable computer system proposed by Estrin in 19601, progressed through the developments of macromodules and Register Transfer Modules, and have reached a point of proliferation with the development of systems at MIT, the University of Delaware, and the University of Washington. (A brief description of these systems, with references, is contained in the paper by Fuller and Siewiorek.) It seems that the second generation systems will be characterized by an attempt to incorporate the developments of large scale integrated circuits and the “computer-on-a-chip” into modular systems. View full abstract»

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  • Some observations on semiconductor technology and the architecture of large digital modules

    Page(s): 15 - 22
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    Modules for computer system design are becoming increasingly complex, driven by decreasing cost and size of hardware and increasing computer system performance requirements. Standard modules have evolved from circuit elements to gates and flip-flops to integrated-circuit chips to register-transfer level module sets. Because of the continuing development of semiconductor technology, LSI components — e.g., memory chips with ≥ 1K bits and microprocessors — may become the standard components of digital design. Are these memory arrays and microprocessors the right set of large modules to use in the next generation of digital system design? To discuss this and related questions, a workshop on the architecture and application of digital modules was held on June 7–8, 1973, at Carnegie-Mellon University. To ensure as wide a range of perspectives as possible, participants were invited from computer manufacturers, semiconductor manufacturers, and universities. View full abstract»

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  • The commercialization of register transfer modules

    Page(s): 23 - 28
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    Unlike the other modules described in this issue, Register Transfer Modules (RTM's)∗∗ have been produced and marketed commercially (by Digital Equipment Corporation). This gives RTM's an interest all their own; it is one thing to conceive of a set of register transfer level digital modules, but quite another to market them. View full abstract»

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  • Experiences with an evolving system

    Page(s): 29 - 34
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    During the past two years, members of the Computer Systems Laboratory and visitors have been designing and constructing computer systems which use restructurable computer building blocks called macromodules.1,2 Conceived and developed to permit convenient experimentation with computer systems, macromodules consist of a set of easily interconnected modules from which working systems can rapidly be assembled. The modules are functionally rich enough to reduce logical detail by a significant amount, and a collection of modules may be directly combined to form larger structures by straightforward mechanical assembly and easily connected cables. View full abstract»

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  • New products: Products and services for the computer systems design professional

    Page(s): 35 - 39
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  • New applications computer systems at work

    Page(s): 40 - 41
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    When customers of a Bronx supermarket leave devouring Devil Dogs, their purchase starts a chain reaction that reverberates across the East and Midwest and results in freshly-baked replacements appearing in the same market less than 24 hours later. View full abstract»

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  • Advertiser's index

    Page(s): 52
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  • Product profile: The computer system designer's marketplace

    Page(s): 53 - 55
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  • Computer Society Publications [advertisement]

    Page(s): 56 - 57
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  • [Back cover]

    Page(s): c4
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Computer, the flagship publication of the IEEE Computer Society, publishes highly acclaimed peer-reviewed articles written for and by professionals representing the full spectrum of computing technology from hardware to software and from current research to new applications.

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Editor-in-Chief
Ron Vetter
University of North Carolina
Wilmington